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  • We're counting down to 2020 with some of our tastiest stories from the past year.

  • Gold Threads.

  • Claris Away traveled over eight cities this year to document the food culture of China.

  • Let's hear what she has to say about her picks for best of 2019.

  • This year, I traveled to over eight cities in China to document the food and culture of the country.

  • First things first.

  • Don't miss our Eat China.

  • Siri's a 13 episode Siris on Chinese food, where I explain in death the four main regions of Chinese cuisine.

  • We started this project to dispel some of the misconceptions surrounding Chinese food.

  • It's far more than just stir fry noodles and dumplings.

  • I don't want to spoil to much.

  • Our videos come out every week, So if you want more, check out the links below.

  • Now, without further ado, these are our top five food stories of 2000 and 19.

  • 1st up, we have the man who has eaten at 7000 Chinese restaurants.

  • I met David years ago in L.

  • A.

  • Where we bonded over food and Asian American history.

  • I've written many articles on him before, but it was such an honor to finally do a video on him.

  • David embodies the definition of a food nerd.

  • Here's a snippet from our video.

  • Hi, I'm David R.

  • Channon is today February 12, 2019.

  • I've eaten at 7440 plus Chinese restaurants, but what happened is about 30 years ago.

  • I probably think that maybe 500 Chinese freshens at that time, and I decided, Well, maybe I should start keeping track of where I've been to prevent inadvertently going to the same restaurant twice.

  • David is a retired tax lawyer and third generation Chinese American from Los Angeles.

  • I met him seven years ago on online Food Forum, called Chowhound and asked him to meet me for lunch.

  • When I noticed he knew an enormous amount about Chinese restaurants in America, he told me he had this massive list of restaurants accumulated over the years Excel spreadsheet, where I list the number of the restaurant Panati order a name of the restaurant and address of the restaurant, and that he had a collection of menus to go with.

  • Um, when I started in your Chinese restaurants, I thought I could have something from that restaurant for me is really preferred.

  • Item is a business card, but some restaurants don't have business cards that have menus.

  • So basically, these are menus from places I went to that didn't have a business card.

  • And so I ended up writing an article on him and drew attention to his list.

  • But David spreadsheet is much more than just a list of Chinese restaurants across the United States.

  • It also sheds light on the evolution of the Chinese food scene in Los Angeles.

  • First time you were here in 92.

  • Yes, it was a really big deal with Ocean Star opened up.

  • Has the crowd change with food or the atmosphere?

  • Well, when it was in 1992 I was like the greatest thing since sliced bread.

  • Everybody had their banquet here.

  • It was just something really phenomenal.

  • Next is one of our most popular explainers to date.

  • The history behind Boba Milk Tea Spoiler alert.

  • Boba is slaying in Taiwanese for big booms.

  • Here's why.

  • Mhm, Boba.

  • It's taken the world by storm.

  • Exciting!

  • Cheers!

  • Two men on a mission to make better Boba, which is milk tea with tapioca pearls.

  • Uh huh.

  • But what exactly is Boba, and what's with a pipe.

  • Invented in the eighties, Boba is a popular beverage that originates from Taiwan.

  • Still, the West is just beginning to understand it.

  • The New York Times famously called it the blobs in your teeth and promptly issued an apology.

  • After all the backlash, both of these tea shops in Taiwan claimed they were the first to invent Boba in the eighties.

  • As the story goes, someone working at the shop decided to put tapioca pearls into T on a whim and like it.

  • But tapioca is an indigenous to Asia.

  • It's a starch derived from the cassava root, a tuber native to South America, it came to Asia in the 19th century via Portuguese traders, and it thrived in Taiwan because Taiwan has a similar subtropical climate to parts of South America.

  • Modern boba pearls are made by combining tapioca starch with brown sugar water there, then submerged in a mix of tea and non dairy milk creamer.

  • But where did the word boba come from?

  • It's actually swing in Chinese for big boobs and came to be associated with a drink in 1988 when a southern Taiwanese tea shop named their tapioca drinks after Hong Kong sex symbol Amy Yip, her nickname Boba.

  • In early summer, I made my way to my friend's hostel.

  • In an way, they're in a center couple who make their own teas and meals from scratch.

  • And they taught me the art of Harry Tofu.

  • Yep.

  • You heard that, right?

  • Tofu with hairs on it.

  • Here's the scoop.

  • Yeah, Mhm.

  • I don't care.

  • You don't blow.

  • You don't smooth your position that you don Shula the whole paddock 0 g from soon do other things.

  • What you should be Oh, was uncle home?

  • So you like the current, uh, in way one.

  • The cut down, uh, woman with the issue.

  • How should a Hawaiian theme texture of Harry tofu is akin to blue cheese soft but with a creamy and noticeable resistance.

  • The white hairs on the tofu are the result of a natural fermentation process.

  • It's a rather obscure kind of soy product, even in China.

  • But locals in the mountains of an we have been eating it for hundreds of years.

  • Total blocks are inoculated with fungal spores and left to sit out in a cool and dry place of between 60 and 75 F.

  • No more to the booth.

  • Can a woman who was thinking you create, uh, don't, uh, Lieutenant region?

  • When the hairs grow long and thick, the tofu is ready to be cooked.

  • Should the end in the model for a your number woman column you, uh, model for in northern China, we explore the city of Qingdao and covered the biggest fear festival in Asia.

  • It was a culinary face of skewers and street food.

  • My personal favorite beers in a plastic bag.

  • Okay, I'm gonna try this beer in a bag.

  • E feel like it's a huge waste.

  • A plastic.

  • Oh, damn, this is really good.

  • Can yeah, e.

  • We're at the Kindle Beer Festival, Asia's largest beer festival, where over 1400 types of beer are served and over six million people visit every year.

  • Qingdao is the city's namesake beer.

  • In 2017, it was the third most consumed beer in the world after American behemoth Budweiser and snow, a Chinese spear Onley sold in China.

  • But while snow may dominate by sheer numbers, Kindle is Mawr.

  • Internationally known, it is one of the oldest beer brands in China started by Germans in the early 20th century.

  • Today it's available in over 70 countries and is the host of this really, really intense beer festival.

  • You know, you got going on Hardy.

  • Oh, God, Yeah, rules that you're gonna show.

  • So this place feels as if Disneyland Octoberfest and Coachella made it and had a baby.

  • It's a bit cheesy, and you're hesitant for a couple of hours, but I think that the appropriation of Western beer culture actually works on.

  • What makes this place particularly awesome is that there's really good comfort.

  • Last but not least, it's not a food round up without mention of spicy Chinese food, I went to Sichuan and hunt down the elusive Sichuan Peppercorn.

  • They're actually quite difficult to procure in the States.

  • Here's why.

  • If you've ever had Sichuan food or spicy hot pot, you've definitely encountered this spice.

  • They're cold Sichuan peppercorns and their native to China, and they're what makes the cuisine so mouth numbingly spicy and the effect can be, well, electric.

  • It's starting to spread alot over my mouth, one study shows.

  • The tingling sensation has the same frequency as some power grids, but I noticed growing up in Los Angeles that the peppercorns in the states weren't really that strong.

  • So I had to go to Sichuan to get the real deal.

  • Seems Celtic Dash.

  • We're on our way to honey in the epicenter of peppercorn production in China.

  • For the Americans out there who onion is to peppercorns, as Napa is wine, it is said that the best peppercorns in the world's come from here.

  • But whether or not that's actually true, well, we'll find out.

  • I met up with Sons Hall, a peppercorn distributor and processor.

  • He took me to King she, a town in Hanyang that allegedly has the best peppercorns in the country straight to you, in a way, because that way you know a woman in a sense, a kind of a, uh A, despite its name, peppercorns aren't actually related to peppers.

  • Sichuan peppercorns have this sort of like lemony in chemistry, sort of a citrusy flavor, so that sort of gives us a hint that it's in the same family as Citrus species.

  • Many different species in the Citrus family do have thorns and specifically younger plants.

  • The reason why peppercorn harvesting is so meticulous is because you see these thorns on it, so you have to do everything by hand.

  • You can't just grab it, Andi.

  • That's why it can be quite expensive.

  • 53 year old Lee So Jin has been picking peppercorns for 30 years Now.

  • She makes roughly $5 for every kilogram picked on average, she can pick 10 kg a day during the harvest season.

  • And that's it for our top five food videos this year.

  • If you have any requests on topics you want us to cover next year, comment below, or send us an email at hello at gold thread to dot com.

  • And, as always, tell all of your friends to subscribe to us at Gold Thread, too.

  • E.

We're counting down to 2020 with some of our tastiest stories from the past year.

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B2 chinese beer sichuan tofu china peppercorn

Our Top Food Videos of 2019: Boba, Hairy Tofu, and Tsingtao Beer

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/20
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