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  • - In my career as a defense attorney,

  • I've handled some of new York's biggest white collar crimes,

  • including defending those accused

  • of insider trading and political corruption.

  • - [Narrator] Today, Vinoo is going

  • to review financial crimes and TV and movies

  • to determine what Hollywood gets right and wrong.

  • [upbeat sleuth music] [coffee pouring]

  • [fan whirring]

  • [TV dial clicking] [electric humming]

  • As you're watching these clips,

  • bear in mind that anyone can be a victim

  • of financial crime, not some little old lady

  • but also the college-educated person who thinks he

  • or she knows what he's doing when it comes to money.

  • [TV static buzzing] [upbeat sleuth music]

  • First step, "Catch Me If You Can."

  • - [Frank] Most trusted name in the sky.

  • - [Vinoo] In this scene, young Leo playing Frank Abagnale

  • is forging checks.

  • - [Frank] I have to earn my wings real soon.

  • Please get in touch with Joanna Carlton from the 10th grade.

  • Tell her I'm sorry that I could

  • not take her to the junior prom.

  • Love, your son, Frank.

  • [bright pleasant instrumental music]

  • - So a lot of fun facts here about Frank Abagnale.

  • In 1967, he was able to pass the Louisiana bar exam

  • without ever having gone to law school.

  • There's so much about this guy.

  • Ultimately, he became an FBI informant,

  • and now he runs a consulting company.

  • [pleasant instrumental music] [water sloshing]

  • In this scene, he is creating a fake check,

  • and he does that by using the actual logo

  • by putting it in a tub and pasting it

  • onto this piece of paper.

  • Today, you could do all of this in 15 minutes.

  • Didn't have to go through the whole rigamarole

  • that he went through back during the movie

  • back in those days.

  • So it's a lot easier today, but of course,

  • very few people use checks, and therefore, [laughs]

  • it makes it these checks are scrutinized more

  • when they're actually put into a bank.

  • [pleasant instrumental music] [muffled chatter]

  • - Hello, how are ya? - Fine, thanks.

  • - So bank tellers or people that work

  • at check cashing places are trained

  • to look out for imperfections in a check.

  • Check fraud is actually monitored by the banks.

  • So check kiting is the crime.

  • They'll see a check, they'll see something off,

  • and they will actually call the authorities

  • from there while they're processing these checks.

  • [TV static buzzing] [intense sleuth music]

  • Next up, "Terminator 2."

  • In this scene, you see a young John Connor

  • using an Atari laptop machine to steal money from an ATM.

  • [electric trilling and clicking]

  • - [Boy] Will you hurry up? This is taking too long.

  • - [John] Go baby, go baby, go baby.

  • All right, pin number.

  • - Computers, ATMs, they've gotten more sophisticated.

  • They're a lot more protection,

  • so some of these things will shut down

  • and not allow you an opportunity to use

  • and get multiple numbers wrong.

  • So in essence, is this accurate from today's standards?

  • Not really.

  • This was something that, back then years ago,

  • that you could do which was try

  • to randomize numbers to figure out the pin.

  • But today it's unlikely that something like this would work.

  • - Where'd you learn this stuff from anyway?

  • - From my mom, my real mom, I mean.

  • Withdraw 3-0-0 bucks. Come on baby.

  • Come on, come on, come on, yes!

  • - [Boy] Hey, it worked.

  • - All right. Easy money.

  • - So young John Connor has an accomplice with him.

  • So that kid who's with him telling him

  • to hurry up clearly is somebody that, in New York,

  • would be called acting in concert with him,

  • where at the federal level,

  • it would be called a co-conspirator

  • 'cause they worked together

  • to get an illegal means accomplished,

  • in this case, stealing money.

  • - Come on, let's go spend some money.

  • - So in 1991 when James Cameron released this movie,

  • it would've been a lot more difficult

  • to capture John Connor.

  • But in 2020, it's gonna be pretty easy

  • for the cops and the bags to chase somebody

  • because they'll have cameras inside

  • and cameras outside, and they can go

  • after these people retracing their your steps.

  • [TV static buzzing] [intense sleuth music]

  • Next up, "Mr. Robot.

  • In this scene, the main character has found a way

  • to transfer money from a Chinese hacker group

  • back into the accounts of the people

  • who originally had their money stolen.

  • - I don't get it. What's going on?

  • - All of the money Whiterose and her cronies

  • has been stealing for decades just went back to the people.

  • - So in the scene, you see the main character,

  • in essence, acting like a Robin Hood

  • and taking money from the thieves or the rich

  • and giving it back to the poor,

  • or in this case, the ones who were defrauded.

  • It's a great concept morally, and in reality,

  • something like this could happen.

  • But you can't do what she's trying to do

  • or no individual can do what she's trying to do

  • because it does involve fraud over the wires,

  • and the US government likes

  • to charge everyone with wire fraud.

  • [bright futuristic music]

  • - How?

  • - We found a way to evenly disperse

  • and anonymously into everyone's E-coin wallets.

  • [muffled chatter]

  • - Everyone got this much?

  • - Yep, and due to E Corp's insistence

  • that E-coin remain independent from the US dollar,

  • it is completely impossible for them

  • to reverse the transactions.

  • - So you're actually viewing the scene,

  • in essence, hacking, right?

  • Which is ultimately just stealing.

  • Now it is a crime.

  • Ultimately, if this actually ever happened,

  • the US government be in a tough position

  • because do they punish the person

  • who is actually making people whole?

  • It's a tough one. I'm not sure which way they would go.

  • - This is illegal. This is stealing.

  • - After what the Dark Army did to you?

  • Fuck, after what they did to everyone,

  • you really wanna start defending them?

  • - This isn't what justice is supposed to look like.

  • We have laws for a reason.

  • - And they were so powerful,

  • they wrote the laws to benefit themselves.

  • They got away with everything because they banked on us.

  • - So let me add this.

  • In terms of how easy this for the United States government

  • to prosecute someone who's involved in Bitcoin fraud,

  • it's not, you know why?

  • 'Cause US government doesn't understand this space.

  • They are really operating in the dark

  • and making guesses and trying to use their knowledge

  • of traditional wire fraud and try to apply it here.

  • But it doesn't really work,

  • so you can expect to see a lot of change in the laws

  • and the government try to catch up over the next few years.

  • [TV static buzzing] [intense sleuth music]

  • Next up, "Wolf of Wall Street."

  • [muffled chatter]

  • - In this scene, you're gonna be watching DiCaprio

  • teach his underlings how to run a pump

  • and dump scheme involving penny stocks.

  • - First, we pitch 'em Disney, AT&T, IBM,

  • blue chip stocks exclusively, companies these people know.

  • Once we've suckered them in, we unload the dog shit,

  • the pink sheets, the penny stocks,

  • where we make the money, 50% commission, baby.

  • - In the scene, Belfort is teaching his underlings

  • how to do a classic pump and dump scheme

  • by ultimately selling penny stocks.

  • These brokers are gonna get 50% commission.

  • This was very profitable

  • until the [laughs] FBI shut this down.

  • In a pump and dump scheme, a brokerage house

  • would buy large quantities of some very cheap stock,

  • of penny stock, and hold it, a bunch of it, for themselves

  • and then designate somebody to move the stocks.

  • And what they do is that they pitch this to clients

  • by paying the brokers a high commission

  • to motivate them to move it.

  • Once the demand peaks,

  • the [indistinct] dumpers dump their stock [laughs]

  • on the open market at the high price and make it killing.

  • This causes a free fall in the stock prices as they sell.

  • It's technically not illegal

  • to sell an over-the-counter stock like they were doing,

  • and even the commission amount is not illegal,

  • but no one's gonna buy something

  • if they know the broker's got a 50% commission.

  • That's a huge red flag.

  • So what's illegal is not being honest

  • and open about the actual price and the fact

  • that there is a nominee there to dump the stock

  • once it hits a certain price.

  • - You finally found a broker

  • on Wall Street that you can trust.

  • - [Man On Phone] Sorry, I appreciate the call.

  • I really have to give this some thought

  • and talk to my wife about it.

  • Can I call you back?

  • - They don't know, right? They gotta think about it.

  • They got talk to the fuckin' wives

  • or the fucking tooth fairy.

  • Point is, doesn't matter what the fuck they say.

  • The only real objection that they have

  • is that hey don't trust you guys.

  • - So when Leonardo DiCaprio says,

  • "You finally found a broker on Wall Street

  • who you can trust and consistently make you money,"

  • but you watch him and you see what he's doing,

  • and he's mocking the person on the other line,

  • this is actually what happened.

  • The movie is very real.

  • Jordan ended up pleading guilty to stock fraud manipulation,

  • and his whole company was shut down.

  • So what you're seeing here is really how these people

  • in these rooms, these boiler rooms,

  • and that was another movie, similar concept,

  • in these boiler rooms behave.

  • [TV static buzzing] [intense sleuth music]

  • Next up, "Identity Theft."

  • In this scene, Melissa McCarthy, a con artist,

  • albeit a funny one, is making a cold call

  • to steal someone's identity.

  • - [Melissa] From the fraud protection department

  • of Identivold Credit Monitoring Service.

  • We're calling today because, unfortunately, it appears

  • that someone has attempted to steal your identity.

  • - Are you kidding me?

  • - This is a type of identity theft.

  • There's many different types. This is one.

  • And in the movie, it's funny because it's Melissa McCarthy,

  • but this is actually realistic.

  • Stuff like this happens.

  • Stuff like this happens when people call elderly people,

  • call immigrants, or send them emails like this.

  • And then they answer their emails

  • and end up giving up their personal information,

  • including social security numbers,

  • that leads to people opening up credit cards in their names

  • and losing lots and lots of money.

  • - Are you kidding me? - Gosh, I wish I were.

  • We did catch this in time, however,

  • but I do suggest you taking advantage

  • of our free total protection plan,

  • which safeguards your credit rating against theft and fraud.

  • - Yes please., if it's free. Absolutely.

  • - [Melissa] Just terrific. I went for this plan myself.

  • - So one of the things that Melissa McCarthy does

  • in this movie, or the writers have done,

  • is actually take something

  • that these swindlers do quite well,

  • which is personalizing it so they will say,

  • Melissa McCarthy says to Jason Bateman,

  • "I've taken this myself," and does it in a sweet voice.

  • This is a move designed to build trust, build rapport,