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  • Heteronyms, heteronyms, heteronyms.

  • Heteronyms; this is a word, and it has a meaning.

  • Heteronyms.

  • It's spelt strangely on the board; that's the correct spelling, but the word is "heteronyms".

  • What the hell are heteronyms?

  • Good question; I'm glad you asked.

  • They are very confusing words, and I don't like them, but I'm doing this to help you

  • because heteronyms are words that are spelled the same-dunh-dunh-dunh-but have completely

  • different pronunciation and meaning.

  • So, when you look at the word, your brain goes: "Oh my god.

  • Do I say it this way or this way?

  • Why are there two different words...

  • One word with two different meanings?"

  • These are called heteronyms.

  • Welcome to the wonderful word of heteronyms.

  • The first heteronym you might know if you play an instrument or if you are a singer,

  • is this word; but if you like to eat fish, you know it as this word.

  • So, this word: "bass" - a kind of fish we call a bass.

  • But if you play an instrument or you sing, it's called a bass.

  • So, "bass" is a kind of instrument; it's a bass guitar or a stand-up bass.

  • Bom-bom-bom.

  • Any stand-up bass players out there or regular bass guitar players?

  • Hey, there.

  • You can play the bass, but you can eat a bass fish.

  • Exact same spelling; both nouns, but the pronunciation and the meaning is completely different.

  • Stay with me on this one.

  • It's going to get more difficult; don't worry.

  • The next one we have is this word; this is an adjective.

  • As an adjective, we say: "close".

  • It's a long "s" sound.

  • "Close" means the same as near.

  • So, you can say: "The elephant is close to me" or "The elephant is near me."

  • The next one we have with this word is "close".

  • We have to really be able to pronounce the "s" and the "z", here.

  • So, this word is "close".

  • "Close" means to shut something.

  • So, this is a verb.

  • For example: "Close the door"; and this is an adjective: "close".

  • The door needs to...

  • We need to close the door because the elephant is close.

  • Or you can say: "Shut the door; the elephant is near."

  • And then you don't have to worry about these crazy things.

  • The next one.

  • I think you guys know this one already; it's very common.

  • We have a noun and a verb.

  • The noun is a land full of sand.

  • Oh, that rhymes; I'm a poet.

  • So, a land of sand is called a "desert".

  • The pron-...

  • The accent is on the first part of the word and it's two syllables, so this word is desert.

  • There's the Sahara Desert, and there's many other deserts, but I don't know the names

  • of them.

  • Then we have the verb: If you abandon someone or you leave them and you don't tell them

  • you're going, this is called "desert".

  • So, you will hear people say: "He deserted me."

  • And then you think: "Is that a food?"

  • No.

  • A food has two Ss.

  • "Oh, are you in the Sahara?"

  • And you go: "No, no, no.

  • I was just abandoned."

  • The...

  • The words with two syllables are a little bit easier, but not that much.

  • The ones that have crazy sounds like this, they're more difficult, so you're going to

  • have to practice; you've got homework.

  • The next one is one of these birds that everyone loves, and it's called a "dove".

  • The spelling is like this, but the pronunciation is like: "dove".

  • A dove is a kind of bird; it's white; it looks like a pigeon.

  • Apparently it's not a pigeon, but I think it's a pi-...

  • It's not a pigeon; it looks like a pigeon.

  • It's not a pigeon.

  • It's a kind of soap brand as well.

  • And then we have the past tense of "dive", which is "dove".

  • So, we have: "dove", the bird of peace-aw-and then we have "dove".

  • So, I can say: The dove dove into the building.

  • Oh my god.

  • Now it's dead.

  • If you're sad about this, maybe you're going to cry and you're going to produce a droplet

  • of water; your eyes are leaking, and this is called a "tear".

  • The pronunciation is like with two e's, so we say: "tear".

  • Then the same word as a verb is if you rip something.

  • If you rip something, you tear it.

  • You might hear someone say: "Tear it up!"

  • That means, like: "Do your best!

  • Yeah!

  • Go, go, go!"

  • So...

  • Or: "Rip it up".

  • "Tear" is like a teardrop when you're crying; and "tear" is you rip.

  • But look at the spelling.

  • Oh my god.

  • It looks like...

  • It looks like "tear", which is actually this one.

  • The next one: "lead" and "lead".

  • "Lead" is a kind of metal that's dangerous to people, so don't be licking lead things

  • anymore.

  • When I was a child, I had a lead dog and he barked a lot, and I licked him, and then I

  • died.

  • That is not true.

  • None of that is true; what I just said.

  • I did have a dog.

  • It was made of lead.

  • I didn't lick it and I'm not dead.

  • So, "lead" is a kind of poisonous metal; and "lead" means to be in charge.

  • This is where we get the noun of "leader".

  • So, "leader" is to be in charge of something; it's from the verb "to lead"; to be in charge

  • of something.

  • Yeah.

  • These two, they're kind of cool because the pronunciation is similar.

  • Oh.

  • You gave me a "present", that's so nice.

  • But something that's not so nice: If you have to "present" something.

  • So, if you have to give a presentation-hey, there's a trick in there-you present.

  • So, I'm presenting this-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-it's my metal dog.

  • But a present is a gift.

  • Check this out: He presented me with a present.

  • He gave me a gift.

  • Easier, but the pronunciation's the same.

  • Oh, this is also a grammar term; some kind of verb, a present verb, which would be the

  • same.

  • Let's not do grammar; this is enough.

  • The next one is a verb.

  • We say: "produce".

  • "Produce" is a verb; means to make.

  • So, you can produce anything in a factory.

  • You can produce things at your house.

  • And, as a noun, "produce", you'll hear people selling fresh produce.

  • "Produce" are things like vegetables or fruits.

  • So, this pronunciation has two meanings...

  • Or, sorry.

  • This word has two meanings and two pronunciations; "produce", which means make, and "produce".

  • This one, we don't use it as much in Canada, but you will hear it: "refuse".

  • "Refuse" just means garbage or waste; that's a noun.

  • This verb we use more.

  • If you "refuse" someone, you object.

  • You say: "Oh, no way.

  • Hell no."

  • So, this is "refuse", which is, like, garbage; and this is "refuse".

  • I'm refusing to do anymore; this is crazy.

  • How are you ever going to learn this?

  • Okay, we'll do it.

  • This one's fun.

  • You know this as "wind".

  • [Blows] So, you go outside and it's windy, and it's air.

  • This is a noun.

  • Okay?

  • The other one we have is "wind".

  • Same word; completely different pronunciation; completely different word.

  • So, you wind a watch; it means you turn something.

  • Also, in British English, if you wind someone up-if you're living in the UK-it means you

  • make fun of them or you try and make them angry.

  • So, you turn something, like you wind your watch.

  • And "wind"-[blows]-is this one.

  • We're almost to the end.

  • Are you happy?

  • Are you amazed and interested of how crazy English is?

  • The last word is this word: "bow" as a verb, you bend at the waist, so we bow.

  • If you are from Japan or Korea, you usually bow to pay respects to people.

  • We don't do that.

  • [Laughs] We don't respect people here, but "bow" means you bend at the waist.

  • The other word is "bow".

  • Tur-bow.

  • "Bow" is something that you need-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-if you're going to play the violin or the viola.

  • This part; this imaginary thing, here, is the violin or the viola, and the bow is this

  • one.

  • En guard.

  • A "bow" is also a noun; you can put it in your hair or decorate a gift with it.

  • So, a "bow" has two meanings; it's a hair, or a wall, or a gift decoration; and also,

  • it's something used to play the violin; also, as a verb, you bend at the waist.

  • I would like to say: Thank you very much-arigatogozaimashita-for watching this lesson.

  • I don't believe I did it.

  • Good luck learning these, and we'll see you next time.

Heteronyms, heteronyms, heteronyms.

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A2 dunh dove dunh dunh bass noun pronunciation

English Heteronyms: Different words that look the same!

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    Summer posted on 2020/11/18
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