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  • Six Minute English from BBC Learning English.  

  • Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English!  I'm Neil and I'm Catherine. Catherine,  

  • I'm going to start this program with a quick test  just for you! Oh, I love tests! Complete this  

  • phrase - wake up and smell the ... Coffee! CoffeeNeil, it's coffee! I have to say that I love  

  • coffee, it's great. Yeah, okay, so do you drink  much? Well, just a couple of cups, you know. Uh,  

  • every day? No, no, every hour! I love  coffee, don't you like coffee, Neil?  

  • I do. Maybe not as much as you! What's the  best thing about it? Oh, it's the smell,  

  • it's got to be the smell. You know when  you open the packet, it's great, isn't it?  

  • Uh, yes, but it never quite tastes as good as  it smells, does it? Well, no. It's always a bit  

  • disappointing. I live in hope. Another cup, I  think it'll be better. I might change brands,  

  • actually, try a different one. Yeah, okay. You've  had quite a lot of coffee today, haven't you? Oh,  

  • just the usual six cups. Well, our topic is  the smell of coffee and coffee is also the  

  • subject of today's question: the world's biggest  producer of coffee is.... Brazil, Brazil. Yes,  

  • yes, but that's not the question. The question isBrazil is the biggest coffee producer - which is  

  • the second largest coffee producing country? Is  it a) Colombia, b) Vietnam or c) Ethiopia? Right,  

  • so it's not Brazil but I bet it's another South  American country so I'm gonna go for Colombia.  

  • Colombia is that right? Okay, we'll have the  answer later in the program by which time maybe  

  • the caffeine will have left your body, CatherineTim Hayward is a coffee shop owner. He appeared  

  • in the BBC radio 4 program, the Kitchen CabinetHow important does he say the smell of coffee is?  

  • Absolutely vital, it's the key thing and you  when you walk into the coffee shop in the  

  • morning and that smell hits you, you're getting  physiological responses. So, how important is it?  

  • I'm feeling a bit calmer now. Tim Hayward says  the smell of coffee is vital. That means it's  

  • very important, it's perhaps the most important  thing. And he backs this up by saying that it's  

  • the key thing. Something that's key is essentialit's really important. And, he says that when you  

  • experience the smell, when the smell hits youyou get a physiological response. This phrase  

  • means your body has a reaction to the smell of  coffee - perhaps your mouth begins to water in  

  • anticipation. Catherine, when you get a coffee  do you normally have it there or take it away?  

  • Well, I usually take it away, although if  I'm feeling really in need of a coffee hit,  

  • I might have one there and then get another one to  take with me. Can you describe the container that  

  • you're given when you have a coffee to go? Yesit's in a tall paper cup with a lid and the lid  

  • has a hole in it so that I can drink that lovely  coffee. Don't you think that's a problem? I mean,  

  • we know how important the smell is, so what's the  effect of the lid on that experience? The effect  

  • of the lid? Yeah, well, here's Tim Hayward againtalking about coffee being served with lids. What  

  • baffles me is how many of the large coffee chains  actually sell a product in a cup that removes the  

  • smell. So, you walk into the coffee shop, you  get the smell but when you actually take the  

  • drink out, you're drinking it from something  that's designed to deliver the hot liquid  

  • directly past your tongue but stop any smell  coming up to your nose. That's just weird. So,  

  • what is it he's describing there? I see, yeshe's talking about the big coffee chains.  

  • A chain is a company that has lots of its stores  in towns and cities, sometimes around the world.  

  • I think we can all think of a few well-known  coffee chains, and he says that by putting a  

  • lid on takeaway cups, you're actually blocking  the smell. That smell that is really important  

  • to the coffee experience. Yes, and he says he  finds that weird, which is a way of saying he  

  • finds it unusual - thinks it's strange, odd. So  much so, that he says it baffles him. If you are  

  • baffled by something you find it confusingYou can't really understand it. Here's Tim  

  • Hayward again. What baffles me is how many of  the large coffee chains actually sell a product  

  • in a cup that removes the smell. So, you walk  into the coffee shop, you get the smell but when  

  • you actually take the drink out you're drinking  it from something that's designed to deliver the  

  • hot liquid directly past your tongue but stop  any smell coming up to your nose. That's just  

  • weird. That was coffee shop owner Tim HaywardRight, before we have another cup of this week's  

  • vocabulary, let's get the answer to the questionAfter Brazil, which country produces most coffee?  

  • Is it a) Colombia, b) Vietnam or c) EthiopiaCatherine, you said... I said it was a) Colombia.  

  • Ah, sorry, no extra coffee for you today. The  answer is Vietnam. And now on to the vocabulary  

  • we looked at. Take it away, Catherine. So, the  first word was vital, which is an adjective that  

  • means very important. And another word with a very  similar meaning was key, meaning essential. Next,  

  • we had the phrase, physiological responsesPhysiological refers to what our bodies do  

  • and a response is a reaction. So, a physiological  response is a reaction your body has to something,  

  • like the smell of coffee. Something that baffles  you confuses you. You don't understand it. You  

  • might find something that baffles you to be  weird. This adjective means unusual or strange.  

  • And finally, a chain is a group of shops  from the same company with the same name.  

  • Well, that is the end of our program. For more  from us check out Instagram, Facebook, Twitter,  

  • Youtube and our app and, of course, the website  bbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, goodbye.  

  • Bye! Fancy a coffee? I think you've had too much!  6 Minute English from bbclearningenglish.com  

  • Welcome to 6 Minute English where we introduce  a refreshing topic and six related items of  

  • vocabulary. I'm Rob and I'm Neil and today  we're talking about water. There's nothing  

  • more refreshing than an ice cold bottle of  water straight out of the vending machine.

  • Hmm, okay, refreshing in this context means  making you feel cool again after being hot  

  • so has that cooled you down, Neil? Yes, I feel  very refreshed now, thanks. Can I ask you though  

  • why didn't you just get a glass of water from the  kitchen tap? That water is cool and refreshing  

  • too, and it's free! Well, I like this brand of  bottled water better. It's enriched with salts and  

  • minerals that are very beneficial to your healthEnriched means improving the quality of something  

  • by adding to it. Enriched, honestly, Neil! It  tastes better, Rob and I'm not the only one who  

  • thinks so. For the first time in the UK, bottled  water is more popular than cola. In fact, can you  

  • tell me how many litres of bottled water was sold  in the UK in 2016? Was it a) 2.9 billion, litres  

  • b) 29 million litres or c 2.9 million litres? Umright. well, I'm going to say 29 million litres.  

  • OK, we'll find out later if you got that right or  wrong. But seriously, Rob, don't you think it's a  

  • good thing that people are choosing to buy bottled  water at the supermarket rather than fizzy drinks?  

  • Yes, of course, but as I said to you earlierwhy don't people just drink tap water?  

  • Let's listen to Natalie Fee, founder of City to  Sea, which campaigns again plastic pollution. And,  

  • of course, bottled water causes a huge  amount of that. Here's Natalie now talking  

  • about how drinks manufacturers have persuaded  people that bottled water is better for them.

  • They manufactured the demand for bottled water  and they spent millions of pounds on adverts,  

  • sort of scaring us off of tap water. The bottled  water companies set out to make us believe  

  • that tap water wasn't healthy and yet tap water  is way more regulated than bottled water is  

  • and in taste tests tap water  comes up trump most times.

  • If you manufacture something you make  it in large amounts in a factory.  

  • But here Natalie says the drinks companies  manufactured the demand for bottled water, which  

  • means they made adverts to persuade people that  tap water wasn't healthy and bottled water was

  • To scare people off - what does that meanRob? Well, if you scare somebody off you  

  • make them go away by frightening them. S,o some  advertisers may have suggested, for example,  

  • that tap water was unsafe to drink, whereas  bottled water was safer and tasted better too.  

  • You're catching on! However, Natalie Fee claims  that tap water is more regulated than bottled  

  • water is. Regulated means controlled. Natalie  also says that in taste tests, tap water comes  

  • up trumps. What does she mean by that? Well, a  taste test is where you ask people to try several  

  • very similar products without knowing which one  is which and then you grade them according to  

  • which you like the best. And if something comes up  trumps, it means it produces a good result, often  

  • unexpectedly. So tap water comes up trump's, ehYep. Perhaps we should try a taste test now, Neil?  

  • It would be interesting to see if your enriched  bottled water comes up trumps or not. I tell you  

  • what, let's leave that until later and hear the  answer to today's quiz question instead. Okay,  

  • I asked you: how many litres of bottled water  were sold in the UK in 2016? Was it a) 2.9 billion  

  • litres, b) 29 million litres or c) 2.9 million  litres? Yeah, and I said 29 million litres. And  

  • the answer is... 2.9 billion litres. Wow! You can  buy many different brands of bottled water with a  

  • range of price tags. At the top end, there's  water from a 4,00 year-old Norwegian iceberg.  

  • How much does that cost? Around £80 a bottleOh, as cheap as that - I'll pop out and get some  

  • later. Okay, let's review the words we learned  today. The first one was refreshing, which means  

  • making you feel cool again after being hot. I  enjoyed a refreshing cup of tea. Hmm, well we  

  • British like to say that, don't we? Though I don't  understand how a hot drink can be refreshing. OK,  

  • number two - enriched, which means improving the  quality of something by adding to it. For example,  

  • did you know that many types of breakfast cereal  are enriched with vitamins and minerals, Neil?  

  • No, I didn't, Rob. You learn something new  every day. Number three is manufacture - to  

  • make something in large amounts in a factoryThis company manufactures wellington boots I'm  

  • a wellington boot manufacturer - that has a nice  ring to it. Anyway, when you scare someone off  

  • you make them go away by frightening them. The dog  barked fiercely and scared off the two burglars.  

  • Down, Rob, down number. Five - regulated or  controlled. For example, the sale of tobacco is  

  • tightly regulated by the government. And finally  - if something comes up trumps it produces a  

  • good result, often unexpectedly. My lottery ticket  came up trumps again, I can't believe it! You're a  

  • lucky man, Neil. Okay, it's time to do that taste  test now. If you have an opinion on bottled water  

  • or anything else, please tell us about it on our  Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or Youtube pages.

  • Okay, this one definitely tastes  better. And how about this one?  

  • Yeah, definitely - that's the tap waterNeil. No, no, no - I refuse to believe it!  

  • 6 Minute English from BBC Learning English.

  • Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English. I'm Neil  and I'm Rob. Now, Rob, you like your food, don't  

  • you? Oh yes. Yum, yum - food one of my favorite  things. And what do you think of street food? Oh,  

  • I love street food - there are some great places  in London where you can find delicious foods  

  • from all over the world cooked in front  of you in market stalls on the street.  

  • It's quite new though, isn't it? Not reallyBritish tradition. I guess not but it seems to  

  • be much more popular these days. Well, our topic  today is street food but before we tuck into that,  

  • here is today's question: recently, archaeologists  in Jordan discovered what they believe is the  

  • oldest remains of bread. How old is this bread? Is  it a) 18,000 years old, b) 14,000 years old or c)  

  • 5,500 years old? What do you think? I don't know  but what I do know is i wouldn't really want to  

  • try sandwich made from that bread - might bebit moldy. Yes, uh, anyway ii'm gonna have a guess  

  • then ii'll go for c) 5500 years old. Right, we  will find out the answer later in the programme.  

  • Mark Laurie is from the nationwide caterers  association. He's an expert in the business of  

  • street food in the UK. He appeared on BBC Radio  4's, The Food Programme and was asked how the  

  • business of street food has changed in recent  years. In his answer, he talks about the areas  

  • where there is most growth in street food. What  are those areas? It's been phenomenal the growth,  

  • uh, in street foods, it's really taken offit's really become quite mainstream - part  

  • of the cultural fabric of the countryreally, or so it's beginning to be. Uh,  

  • certainly in the bigger cities and increasingly  in the sort of provinces, if you like.  

  • So where does he say the popularity of street  food is growing? He says that it's in the bigger  

  • cities and also in the provinces. The provinces  is a word which means the parts of a country  

  • outside of the cities, so essentially he's saying  it's getting more popular everywhere. Exactly! In  

  • fact, he says the growth is phenomenal. This means  he thinks the growth is spectacular - really big.  

  • Yes, he says that it's really taken off. Taken  off is one of those phrasal verbs that can be  

  • used in many different ways. In this sensewhen something takes off it means it becomes  

  • successful and popular. You know, street food  isn't really something you associate with Britain.  

  • Perhaps it's the climate or British food, so  street food is something that we're now getting  

  • used to and enjoying more. In fact, Mark says that  it's now becoming mainstream. This means it's no  

  • longer something that is seen as being unusual or  different - it's becoming an accepted part of the  

  • everyday eating experience. Well, let's listen  again to Mark Laurie talking about the growth of  

  • street food in the UK. It's been phenomenal, the  growth in street foods - it's really taken off,  

  • it's really become quite mainstream - part of the  cultural fabric of the country, really, or so it's  

  • beginning to be. Certainly in the in the bigger  cities and increasingly in the sort of provinces,  

  • if you like. Mark Laurie goes on to talk about  why street food has become popular. What kind of  

  • food does he say it's not like? Yeah, it's just  really captured the imagination of the public.  

  • It's honest food, it's authentic food and  it's people that you can trust making it.  

  • It's not some microwave food or whatever  that you might get in your local pub.  

  • So, street food is many things but what isn't  it? Well, he says that it's not like food you  

  • might get in some pubs. That food, he saysmay be some microwave food - which is food  

  • prepared in a microwave oven. You knowquite like a microwave meal now and then,  

  • and I reheat my leftovers in the microwave. But  I guess if you were paying for a nice meal you  

  • wouldn't expect reheated leftovers. I think  the point he's making is that in many places,  

  • the food you're served is not freshly madeit may be pre-prepared and finished off in a  

  • microwave. Street food, he says, is authenticYes, authentic - it's real, fresh and cooked  

  • right in front of you and if it's food fromparticular country it's probably being prepared  

  • by people from that culture. He also says that  this has captured the imagination of the public.  

  • It's something that the public have experienced  and thought, yep, you know, I like this. This  

  • is a great idea. Well, all this sort of food is  making me hungry, so let's get the answer to the  

  • quiz and review today's vocabulary before we head  off and grab a bite to eat. We asked about the age  

  • of bread discovered by archaeologists in JordanWas it a) 18,000 years old, b) 14,000 years old  

  • or c) 5,500 years old? And I said c) 5 500 years  old. And I'm afraid it's a lot moldier than that.  

  • The answer was 14,000 years. Ah, very tasty,  I'm sure. Yes, right then the vocabulary - we  

  • started off with the adjective phenomenal to  describe something that is amazing, remarkable  

  • and extraordinary. Then we had - to take off - a  phrasal verb which means to become popular. Street  

  • food has really taken off in the UK - it's become  really popular. And not just in the cities but  

  • also in the provinces which is a noun to describe  areas of a country that aren't the major cities.  

  • Something which captures the imagination is  something which makes you interested and not  

  • just for a short time. And one thing which has  captured the imagination of the British public  

  • is authentic street food. Something authentic is  real - it's genuine. It's not a fake or a copy.  

  • And finally, we had microwave food - food  prepared in a microwave oven and that kind  

  • of food is not seen by some as authenticWell, it's time to eat, so that's all we  

  • have time for today. Join us again next time and  remember you can find us on Instagram, Facebook,  

  • Twitter, Youtube and, of course, on our websitebbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, bye. Bye.

  • I'm Rob and welcome to 6 Minute English. We've  got a sweet topic today and six tempting items  

  • of vocabulary. Hello, I'm Neil and we're going  to be talking about sugar which many of us find  

  • tempting. But how much is too much, Rob? I don't  know, Neil, but hopefully we'll be finding that  

  • out. I must admit, though, I have a sweet tooth  and that means I like sugary things. Me too  

  • but something I'm always seeing in the news these  days is that we're eating too much sugar. And one  

  • important factor is that sugars are sometimes  hidden in processed foods. Processed food is any  

  • food that has been changed in some way by freezing  it or putting it in tins, or by combining foods or  

  • adding chemicals. In fact, some of the sugars  we eat are hidden in food that we think of as  

  • healthy, such as yoghurts, low-fat snacks and  fruit drinks. Do you check the information on the  

  • back of food packets, Rob, to see what's in themYes, I do, but it can be very confusing - there's  

  • so much information and I'm not always sure  how much of a certain thing is bad. Well,  

  • that brings me on to today's quiz question. Can  you tell me: if a food contains five percent total  

  • sugars per 100 grams, is it a) high in sugar,  b) low in sugar or c) somewhere in the middle?  

  • I'll say low, Neil. Okay, well, we'll find out  later. Some food products have colour coding  

  • on the packaging to help you understand the  information, don't they? Red for high levels  

  • of sugar, salt or fat, orange for medium and green  for low. That sounds helpful. Then you can see at  

  • a glance what's good or bad for you. At a glance  means with a quick look. Okay, let's listen now  

  • to BBC reporter Rajiv Gupta interviewing a man in  Chester in the UK. He's asking him to guess how  

  • much sugar there is in a pot of fat-free yoghurt.  I've actually got a pot of yoghurt in front of me.  

  • This says fat-free on it and it's been marketed  as being quite healthy. If I was to say to you,  

  • how much sugar is in here what would you  say, as I say, a quantity of the tub?  

  • I'd probably think maybe a couple of teaspoonfulsyou know, it's quite surprising how much there's  

  • sugars in all these products, isn't thereWell, there's about a third of this yoghurt  

  • pot is actually sugar. To be honest, that's quite  amazing, that. I would never have thought a third  

  • of that would have been sugar in the... just  by looking at it and it does say it's fat-free.  

  • So the yogurt is fat-free which means it doesn't  contain any fat and the man guessed there might be  

  • two teaspoons of sugar in the yoghurt. That's  right, and if something is sugar-free then it  

  • doesn't contain any sugar. But in this case, a  third of the yoghurt's content was sugar. That  

  • to me sounds like an awful lot -even for  someone with a sweet tooth like me. Okay,  

  • well, let's listen to Dr Gunter Kuhnle. He's a  nutritional biochemist at Reading University