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  • Before we get a new iPhone,

  • we get an Apple keynote.

  • Tim Cook: We've got some really exciting things

  • to share with you,

  • and we're gonna have some fun along the way.

  • Narrator: Apple has been holding this style

  • of presentation for over 20 years.

  • But it isn't just showing new products;

  • it's telling a story.

  • Over the years, the presentation has gotten flashier,

  • but the story hasn't changed.

  • The keynotes always open with a video.

  • Which conveys a theme or idea that the keynote echoes.

  • It's the introduction to the story.

  • But it usually isn't about products.

  • It's about imagination, accessibility,

  • or even New York City.

  • ♪ I happen to like New York

  • ♪ I happen to like this town

  • Apple includes several more videos

  • throughout its presentation.

  • These build suspense leading up to a product reveal.

  • And make a product feel larger than life.

  • Then, it's time for a history lesson.

  • Tim Cook takes the stage, says "good morning."

  • Cook: Good morning.

  • Narrator: And shows how Apple has been

  • in your life for years.

  • He also explains the positive impact Apple has had.

  • Part of that impact is growing communities.

  • Apple products aren't presented as just computers or phones.

  • The devices bring people together.

  • And improve their lives.

  • You might have also noticed that they exaggerate...a lot.

  • Apple describes everything with superlatives.

  • Just listen to this description of the Apple Watch.

  • That same segment says beautiful seven times.

  • Repetitive exaggeration drives home Apple's message

  • about a product.

  • If a speaker keeps saying revolutionary,

  • you walk away thinking this phone is revolutionary.

  • But you won't find too many specs in an Apple presentation.

  • Apple talks in percentages more often than specifics.

  • It's 40% lower power.

  • Phil Schiller: 40% more energy efficient.

  • Narrator: Or five times faster.

  • Tom Boger: Five times faster than before.

  • Narrator: You just need to know that this new version

  • is better than the old one.

  • Schiller: The iPhone XS Max.

  • Narrator: Apple doesn't spend time talking

  • about RAM or milliamps.

  • It prefers fancy marketing terms,

  • like Retina or 3D Touch.

  • Then it improves on its own terms.

  • Plus to Max.

  • Retina to Super Retina.

  • But it still manages to keep the message clear and simple,

  • often using a single phrase per slide.

  • It also helps that Apple's presenters are experts

  • at keeping the audience engaged.

  • They tell you exactly what to think.

  • Schiller: Well, you are going to be blown away

  • with the pictures you can take with the iPhone XS's camera.

  • Jeff Williams: We think you're gonna love everything

  • about the new displays on Series 4.

  • Schiller: We all love the cameras in our iPhone.

  • Narrator: And they talk in a conversational tone.

  • Cook: Wasn't that a fun video?

  • Narrator: It feels like a small presentation

  • you were invited to.

  • Not a livestream that millions are watching.

  • Apple's keynotes started a trend

  • that many other tech companies have followed.

  • But companies like Google and Samsung aren't nearly

  • as effective as Apple.

  • Compare the introduction of the Galaxy Note 10

  • to the iPhone XS.

  • Drew Blackard: The Note 10 is built for a new generation.

  • It's a generation that's reshaping everything

  • about how we work and how we live.

  • These days, we're catching up on work email one minute

  • and gaming with friends the next.

  • The line between work and play has pretty much disappeared.

  • And that means we need technology

  • that can seamlessly flow between the two.

  • Schiller: I am so excited to tell you all about iPhone XS.

  • It is made of a surgical-grade stainless steel.

  • It has a gorgeous new gold finish,

  • on the front and on the glass.

  • It is the most beautiful iPhone we have ever made.

  • Narrator: Apple is specific.

  • It shows instead of just telling.

  • And you're made to believe

  • this is the most beautiful iPhone ever

  • because of Phil Schiller's delivery.

  • Samsung tries to be everything at once,

  • and the message gets lost.

  • But Apple is able to tell a cohesive story

  • that keeps you engaged.

  • Layering these techniques creates a presentation

  • that feels important.

  • Nothing may be new, but it all feels groundbreaking.

  • Cook: That uses intelligent software

  • to make the most stunning portraits.

  • This was only previously possible with pro-level equipment.

  • Narrator: He's just talking about the iPhone's camera.

  • Nothing specific or new.

  • Apple uses bold statements to reinforce its importance.

  • Laura Legros: Now, the MacBook Air set the bar

  • for great battery life in a thin and light computer,

  • and the new MacBook Air is no exception.

  • Schiller: What the team has done

  • is truly, truly break through.

  • It's called the A12 Bionic.

  • Your photos look stunning on iPhone XS.

  • Narrator: And it works.

  • These presentations build huge anticipation

  • before a product launch.

  • With Apple products, it often feels

  • as though the design is more important than what's inside.

  • The same is true of these keynotes.

  • Apple is selling the brand, not an iPhone.

  • And these presentations have become

  • an essential part of that sale.

Before we get a new iPhone,

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Apple's Secret Keynote Formula, Explained

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/12
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