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  • - Hello?

  • - Hello?

  • - Sup.

  • - Welcome to my car.

  • You're now virtual passengers.

  • Today, Steven, we're doing savory pie.

  • An episode I'm very excited to do,

  • which is why I'm in the car

  • picking up the pies to bring to you guys.

  • (Steven claps) - All right!

  • Well, today on Worth It,

  • we're gonna be trying three savory pies

  • at three drastically different price points

  • to find out which one is the most worth it

  • at its price.

  • - A savory pie is like a chicken pot pie.

  • We're also talking about small handheld pies.

  • - And in some parts of the world,

  • when they say pie, they mean 3.141592...

  • Something, something- - Keep going, keep going.

  • - Something, something.

  • - Pot pie is one of my favorite foods.

  • - And when you got the flaky crust-

  • - Oh! - That buttery crust.

  • - Our first pie is going to be of the handheld variety.

  • We're seeing Winston at his food truck, Saraba,

  • which specializes in Belizean Garifuna cuisine.

  • And we're having his panades.

  • (relaxing music)

  • - My name is Winston Miranda

  • from Saraba Garifuna Cuisine.

  • My food is typically from a culture

  • which is the Garifuna people.

  • My ancestors, they came from a part of South Africa,

  • Sierra Leone, and they migrated to Saint Vincent.

  • And from Saint Vincent they went to Honduras,

  • from Honduras they went to Belize.

  • Our food is very unique.

  • We have one that we call the hudut,

  • which is like a staple food there

  • we eat every day.

  • The fisherman will go to the sea

  • and bring the fish in,

  • and then we fry it, we'll season the coconut milk

  • and get a flavor off of it,

  • and add the fish to it, and boil some plantain.

  • And then they will mash it

  • so you can get it real smooth,

  • and put it like a ball,

  • and then you'll eat it with the coconut milk.

  • The panades is like a appetizer.

  • Most Americans call it like, American Hot Pockets.

  • And it can be eaten any time of the day,

  • early in the morning, late at night, mid-day.

  • We take the masa, and then we use the achoite.

  • In Belize they call it recado, it's a red paste.

  • And the masa will turn from white to red.

  • And then people will say,

  • "Oh yeah, he's making authentic panades."

  • Just by the color when people look at it.

  • You can do it with fish, you can do it with chicken,

  • and you can do it with beans.

  • Flatten it up, and then we fry it.

  • There's a habanero onion sauce.

  • I can make it spicy and I can make it non-spicy.

  • Late at night when I'm doing like clubs

  • and all that stuff, people are drunk,

  • so they want the hot, hot one,

  • the hot habanero sauce.

  • So, that'll wake them up.

  • Saraba means "wake up".

  • - [Andrew] Oh.

  • - Yeah.

  • That's what it means, "wake up".

  • (cash register rings)

  • - Ooh.

  • The smell is really good.

  • It kind of smells like Fritos.

  • - Oh, whoa!

  • - [Andrew] Is this the shape you think of

  • when you think of pie?

  • - When I think about pie, I think autumn,

  • I think leaves.

  • Pumpkin pie, that's the classic pie.

  • I love how the outside looks like the crust

  • of a really good pizza.

  • Cheers.

  • - Cheers.

  • (lighthearted music)

  • - Mm. - Mm.

  • - It's interesting how tightly the seafood is wrapped.

  • It's like tightly wound around the dough,

  • which I really like.

  • - Yeah, and then you just have like

  • the thin crust around the outside.

  • - Kind of like a fish?

  • - Like a stegosaurus.

  • Oh, sure, like a fish.

  • (chuckling)

  • - I want onion relish.

  • - Yeah, let's go onion relish.

  • - Mm.

  • - Oh, yeah! - Yeah.

  • - That's the stuff. - It's perfect.

  • - Okay.

  • - Just a nice vinegar bath goin across that thing.

  • - Oh man!

  • It's so good. - Oh yeah!

  • Ooh.

  • - [Steven] Oh, wow!

  • - And a little spicy.

  • - Man, flavor combinations.

  • - It tastes very similar to squeezing lime on a taco.

  • - You know the super satisfying power washing videos?

  • - Yeah.

  • - I don't know why, but I was just reminded of those.

  • - No, that totally makes sense.

  • It's like when a liquid is sharp.

  • When I first opened the box I was like wow,

  • you get a lot of these.

  • Now I'm like, should've doubled it.

  • - I'm gonna do one more.

  • I'm going to be talking about the onion sauce

  • until the day I die.

  • - I thought it was a mistake how much

  • onion stuff we got, actually.

  • But it was so good, I was shoveling it into my mouth.

  • I'm ready for a savory pie fact.

  • - [Steven] Savory pie fact!

  • - The fist known usage of "sweetie pie"

  • dates from 1928.

  • - 1928?

  • That seems pretty late for "sweetie pie".

  • That would've been revolutionary.

  • Like, sweetie pie, whoa.

  • I'm more of a savory pie myself,

  • but you can call me a sweetie pie.

  • - Sweetie pie is something that I call my cat, actually.

  • - Yeah?

  • Is he a little sweetie pie?

  • - He is a little sweetie pie.

  • - Does he do that thing where he like,

  • stops there next to you, drop kinda like on his belly

  • and roll around?

  • What is that about?

  • Like, what does that mean by the way?

  • - It means that they are a sweetie pie.

  • - Oh, okay, got it.

  • - For our next savory pie

  • we're visiting Natalia at WOODSPOON

  • to try her Brazilian chicken pot pie.

  • We're also going to have their house-made sangria.

  • (lighthearted music)

  • - WOODSPOON serve a traditional food from Minas Gerais,

  • where I'm from.

  • We have a lot to offer in terms of our culinary.

  • We are very simple, but our flavor very unique.

  • I was born and raised in Brazil.

  • When I got here, of course, it was very hard for me

  • because no speak any English at all.

  • You know, I didn't understand why you go to the beach

  • with an outfit on, you know?

  • Why can't you get on a bus in a bikini?

  • Why you don't go and get fresh eggs from somewhere,

  • or there was fresh chicken from some places.

  • The way we would do in Brazil

  • is a little different than here,

  • because you have the privilege to buy

  • just a particular type of meat,

  • then my mom would make a whole chicken.

  • Here, I was able to buy chicken thigh.

  • We have to clean them one by one,

  • removing all the fats, unnecessary pieces that is there

  • to make sure it's nice and clean.

  • I save the broth and I use the fat that stays above

  • to make the roux.

  • Add the hearts of palm, corn, olives.

  • Hearts of palm is a heart of a palm tree,

  • and it is a particular one.

  • In Brazil, you can actually get, like,

  • they can be this tall, this big.

  • But here, we only get the very small parts of it.

  • Corn, we had it everywhere in the backyard

  • where we planted it ourselves.

  • Olives, because you know, we are Portuguese.

  • Brazil is a country with all countries in it.

  • You know, people get surprised how we have

  • the biggest Japanese community in the world

  • is in Brazil.

  • There is more Lebanese in Brazil than in Lebanon.

  • Like, we have in my town in Minas, a lot of Chinese.

  • Because the agriculture, the farming.

  • We have stroganoff, a German dish.

  • We have all these incredible

  • cultures and gastronomy in Brazil

  • that I felt like opening WOODSPOON

  • would give me an opportunity to

  • show a little bit more what Brazil can offer.

  • I just wanted people to know Brazil

  • not just the postcard,

  • but also into those little cultures

  • that it's so rich, and so real, and so important.

  • This is my home.

  • Whatever we can do for people

  • to educate themselves through food.

  • I believe food is a bridge that connects us all,

  • and this is mine.

  • - Okay, fellas.

  • Welcome to the next pie.

  • - I'm ready.

  • - We have two house-made sangrias.

  • - The red sangria we have citruses,

  • we have black pepper, we have cinnamon,

  • and a little bit of a touch of a secret.

  • And then we have in the white one,

  • a base of passion fruit.

  • - Passion fruit Chardonnay.

  • - You know what it is?

  • It's an in between color.

  • - Look at that.

  • - Those are the best colors.

  • Some lights it's one thing, others it's another.

  • - Cheers.

  • (lighthearted music)

  • - Oh my God.

  • - Geez Louise.

  • - That should be illegal.

  • Okay, now just a little of the red.

  • - Holy! - Whoa!

  • - Smokes.

  • This is the best sangria I've ever had.

  • - So, check out this pie, that spoon.

  • - Oh!

  • I didn't even see the spoon.

  • - Oh.

  • - Oh my goodness.

  • (chuckling)

  • - Oh!

  • - That's perfect.

  • That is-

  • - That is really perfect.

  • Buttery chicken.

  • I was also a little bit surprised

  • that there were olives in this pot pie,

  • but it doesn't taste overly olive-y.

  • - You know when you meet somebody

  • and you're just like, we're gonna be best friends.

  • I've never met you before,

  • but the connection is there, the chemistry,

  • like something about you and me, we just get along.

  • And I have never met this chicken pot pie before,

  • but I already know, I already know you.

  • - It's like an old baseball mitt.

  • It has this like, supple familiarity.

  • - Yes, supple.

  • - Do you want us to eat the sauce?

  • - Wait, sauce?

  • What sauce?

  • - This green sauce on the side.

  • - Oh, I put that in the salad.

  • - The thick sauce?

  • - The thick sauce.

  • - You put the thick sauce in the salad?

  • (laughing)

  • - I didn't know!