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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hey everyone, it's your girl Jenn,

  • and if you've clicked on this video,

  • then you are probably searching

  • for books to add to your list.

  • Well, you're in luck, because today I'm sharing five books.

  • So first up we have "The Coddling of the American Mind"

  • by Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff.

  • So Greg Lukianoff is an attorney

  • and a First Amendment expert,

  • and Jonathan Haidt is a social psychologist and a professor.

  • This book is a specific critique and observation

  • from the iGen that is currently

  • studying in college campuses today

  • or have recently graduated from college.

  • So this book points out three lies

  • that are being pumped into college campuses today,

  • and how it's actually ruining our ability

  • to critically think and to be able to be resilient.

  • So the first great untruth is that

  • what doesn't kill you makes you weaker.

  • This is a lie, because it encourages us

  • to not take any risks and to avoid pain and discomfort,

  • and potentially all bad experiences.

  • But the thing is, humans are not fragile beings.

  • In fact, the more we withstand

  • pain and discomfort and adversity,

  • we get stronger.

  • It's called being antifragile.

  • When I reflect on anything that I'm proud of in my life,

  • they were not just, like, walks in the park and being chill.

  • They required me to be uncomfortable and diligent.

  • There's a reason why you always need

  • to go out of your comfort zone in order to grow.

  • So the second lie is "always trust your feelings."

  • Now, feelings are compelling.

  • However, they are not reliable.

  • I don't know about you, but every day

  • I have different waves of feelings and emotions,

  • from feeling motivated, to happy,

  • to down, insecure, envious.

  • This lie isn't about ignoring your feelings,

  • but it's about being aware of them.

  • I found this chapter so interesting

  • because this is where they talk about cognitive distortions.

  • It's this list which I'll put over the screen,

  • but these are ways of how our minds/feelings trick us

  • from believing something that isn't true.

  • So the third lie is that life is a battle

  • between good and evil people.

  • It's pretty much drawing a line in the sand

  • and saying, "You're either with me or against me."

  • Now, this way of thinking

  • is ingrained in our primitive brains.

  • This is why we love teams,

  • and pitting people against each other.

  • It's essentially our tribalism flaring up,

  • and that is our evolutionary ability

  • to band together and prepare for conflict.

  • So this is why we love sports teams.

  • This mentality completely destroys our ability to empathize

  • and to remember that there are always

  • two sides to the story.

  • Either way, I found this book incredibly enlightening.

  • I think this is the first kind of book

  • where it really challenged my way of thinking.

  • Obviously, please read this with a critical mind

  • and not absorb everything in this book as truth.

  • If you do decide to read this book,

  • this is actually October's book pick

  • for my book club, Curl Up Club.

  • We are gonna do a discussion on this,

  • so please feel free to check out the Instagram page,

  • I will leave the details in the description box.

  • So my next book is called

  • "How to Change Your Mind" by Michael Pollan.

  • Now this book is a trip, literally.

  • It's all about psychedelics and psilocybin, LSD,

  • entheogens, if you will,

  • and how they can help provide relief

  • to people suffering from depression, addiction, and anxiety.

  • Quite frankly, LSD and shrooms have had a bad reputation,

  • especially from the late 60s,

  • because it was overabused from Timothy Leary

  • and other radical thought leaders from this time.

  • However, you can't let that override

  • the incredible studies and results

  • that were happening before this time.

  • There were a lot of studies being done

  • in the 1950s and the early 1960s,

  • and doctors suddenly regarded these two chemical compounds

  • as miracle drugs, because they were healing their patients.

  • When they're used properly,

  • it can really change somebody's life.

  • Now, this book is extremely thorough,

  • and goes over the whole history of LSD, psilocybin,

  • and he actually tries each one

  • and describes his experiences as well.

  • I found that really interesting. (chuckles)

  • He mentions that there are two most important things

  • on having an optimal trip,

  • and that is set and setting.

  • So the mindset that you're going into the experience,

  • and the setting, which is where you decide to have it,

  • are so, so important.

  • So psychedelics put your brain into a state of wonder,

  • as if you're looking through the world for the first time,

  • and it can have some transformative effects

  • if done properly and dosed properly.

  • I just love books where they expand on taboo subjects

  • and make it incredibly informative,

  • packed with data, information, and a fresh perspective.

  • So yeah, definitely go check it out.

  • Next up we have "Song of Achilles" by Madeline Miller.

  • A couple of months ago I read "Circe,"

  • and I absolutely love that book.

  • It was mentioned in my last books video,

  • and so many of you guys recommended "Song of Achilles."

  • So this story is about the relationship

  • of Achilles and Patroclus.

  • Now, I'm pretty sure we all know who Achilles is,

  • but Patroclus is the narrator.

  • So Patroclus was exiled from his home as a young boy,

  • and he is sentenced to live in King Peleus' kingdom.

  • Now, King Peleus just accepts exiles

  • from all around the world

  • because that way he can grow his army.

  • It's actually a brilliant tactic.

  • But anyway, this is where Patroclus and Achilles meet,

  • and they're both kind of outcasts in their own way.

  • Patroclus has always had trouble fitting in,

  • and Achilles is a bit of an outcast

  • because he is a half-god, half-mortal, like a demigod,

  • so in a sense people just hold him to a different standard

  • and find him really intimidating.

  • But yeah, they end up being fast friends,

  • and then eventually lovers, and then life partners.

  • It's really beautiful and just tragic all around,

  • it will take you on a rollercoaster of emotions.

  • They end up going to war against the Trojans,

  • and you are just in it for the journey,

  • you just gotta buckle up.

  • It's very action packed, emotional, heart-wrenching.

  • Just get ready to get transported to another world

  • when you're reading this.

  • Next on the list we have "Antkind" by Charlie Kaufman.

  • Charlie Kaufman is one of my favorite

  • screenwriters, directors,

  • and he actually wrote my favorite film,

  • "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,"

  • and when I saw he wrote a book,

  • I was like, add to cart immediately.

  • Now, this book is thick. She's like 720 pages thick.

  • This book will definitely have polarizing opinions,

  • you'll either love it or you hate it,

  • but it's pretty obvious where I stand.

  • So this book is about B. Rosenberger Rosenberg,

  • who is pretty irritating, but a hilarious narrator.

  • He's like a middle-aged, neurotic film critic,

  • and he happens to watch the greatest film ever created,

  • which is a three-month-long film in stop motion.

  • Then, unfortunately, the only copy of the film

  • ends up getting destroyed,

  • and it becomes his job and his life mission

  • to try to remember it.

  • It's insane, and of course, extremely cerebral,

  • you're basically traveling in his mind.

  • I love Kaufman's writing style because he takes his time

  • to build the world of B., who is so unlikable,

  • but you just can't take your eyes off of him.

  • He's like...

  • How do I describe him? He's like...

  • He's like an overthinking "woke" train wreck.

  • And when you get to the core of him,

  • he's just an extremely insecure