Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • (upbeat music)

  • - So the phones, they fold now,

  • they fold like this and they fold like this,

  • and they fold like this.

  • And they also fold like this.

  • So lots of different ways to fold,

  • but here's the question.

  • Why would you want that?

  • What I want to do in this video

  • is talk about all the different kinds of folding phones

  • that are coming out right now,

  • and what their benefits really are.

  • Because look, folding phones are super expensive.

  • You are not getting one of these for less than 1300 bucks.

  • Unless we talk about this weird LG

  • with its extra screen case thing.

  • In general, folding phones are more expensive.

  • They're usually more fragile,

  • and they're also usually thicker than a regular phone

  • when they're folded up.

  • Plus on top of all that, every single one of these phones

  • has its own particular software quirks.

  • That is all a lot of reasons not to buy a folding phone.

  • And honestly, I don't think you should buy a folding phone.

  • Not yet anyway.

  • But assume the price could come down

  • and the durability hit some bar where it's good enough.

  • And that might take a while, but assume all that happens,

  • then the question really is

  • why would you want one of these folded the phones?

  • And the answer turns out to be different

  • for every single one of these phones.

  • Well, maybe some of them are actually kind of like tablets.

  • They're computers?

  • No, we are not going into the what's a computer question.

  • We're just gonna call these Android devices.

  • Okay? (laughs) Done.

  • I put these Android devices into four basic categories.

  • There are flip phones, like the Galaxy Z Flip.

  • There are single screen folding phones,

  • like the Galaxy Fold.

  • There are dual screen folding phones,

  • like the Microsoft Duo.

  • And there's other, like this LG here.

  • You know what?

  • Let's just get other out of the way,

  • because other is where LG lives.

  • This is the LG velvet,

  • with a second screen accessory case for it.

  • And it basically lets you run two apps at once.

  • And I mean, it works sorta,

  • but the thing is just big and thick, kind of fussy.

  • Other is also where LG does other weird things

  • like the LG wing concept,

  • which rotates and shows a second screen behind it.

  • I love you LG,

  • and you deserve to have one of these ideas become a hit.

  • Just not there yet.

  • I just hope you keep swinging for the fences.

  • So really all of the momentum right now

  • is behind these three ideas.

  • The flip phone, the single fold folding phone

  • and the dual screen folding phone.

  • And each has its benefits and drawbacks.

  • And you know, just saying, "Benefits and drawbacks,"

  • Is really cliche and it's easy to ignore.

  • So I'm gonna try and hit this a little bit harder

  • because this is really important.

  • They are good at different things.

  • And what that really means is they have different purposes.

  • And you should know what the purpose

  • of each device is going in

  • because that purpose is the answer

  • to the reason why you might wanna buy

  • one of these folding phones.

  • Now, there is one purpose

  • that all three of these phones share.

  • They're just cool.

  • They're cool, and they're different, all right?

  • I mean, this is rad.

  • This is literal glass that folds in half.

  • I mean, come on, you can't be cynical about this.

  • And the Duo is just beautiful.

  • Look how thin it is.

  • Just look at it. It's amazing.

  • Luxury tiers exist in pretty much

  • every major consumer product category.

  • And these are luxury products.

  • Phones aren't just about functionality,

  • they're also cultural artifacts, just like any other thing.

  • There's luxury handbags, and now you've got luxury phones.

  • There's this other benefit to these phones

  • that they all share that's a little bit hard to quantify.

  • You close it, and your phone stuff is shut,

  • it's done inside the phone.

  • You don't just set the phone down,

  • you physically change it's state.

  • It becomes an entity attentional act.

  • It says, "I am done with this."

  • And maybe that also is going to mean

  • that you need to make an equally intentional act

  • to open it up and look at your phone.

  • And maybe that makes you

  • just a little bit less likely to have all of your attention

  • dominated by your phone, Android device, whatever.

  • So let's talk about each of these categories

  • of folding Android devices and what they're good at.

  • Theoretically anyway,

  • sometimes the execution falls a little bit short.

  • The first and the simplest category is the flip phone style.

  • This takes the phone shape that you already know,

  • and maybe love, and then you get to fold it in half

  • and get something smaller.

  • It is a little bit of a thicker package,

  • but it's a smaller one.

  • So it sits in your pocket or your bag differently,

  • and I think better.

  • You get the physical benefit of a more compact device,

  • like literally it's like a compact,

  • like here's my compact that I use for makeup for video.

  • And it's like kind of similar in size.

  • Anyway, that's it.

  • It's a very cool luxury phone

  • that you can close and be done with,

  • that also maybe fits in your pocket

  • or your bag more easily.

  • Really that's enough. The end on flip phones.

  • Okay, then there are the big boys,

  • the Galaxy Fold and this thing right here,

  • the Galaxy's Z Fold 2 5G.

  • Now I literally un-boxed the Galaxy's Z fold 2 5G

  • just a couple of hours ago.

  • So I'm nowhere near ready to review it yet.

  • But I could tell you that I'm already impressed.

  • The build quality on this thing

  • is so much better than the first Fold.

  • This outer screen is actually usable,

  • and the inner screen is made out of glass

  • and it's way nicer 'cause it just has

  • a little hole punch camera instead of a giant notch.

  • But this category overall is really simple.

  • It gives you a phone that turns into a small tablet.

  • So you get a bigger screen when you want it,

  • and a smaller screen when you don't.

  • Overall though, it's pretty thick.

  • And it's also not very easy to carry around.

  • But maybe it's easier to carry around

  • than say like an iPad mini.

  • And actually the screen on the inside

  • is virtually the same size as an iPad mini.

  • You know what?

  • I've reviewed the original galaxy Fold last year, twice.

  • Once on the broken first design,

  • and then once again on the redesign.

  • And in those two reviews,

  • I really did figure out why I think this form factor

  • is so interesting.

  • So I'm just gonna quote myself.

  • Think about this thing that happens all the time

  • with your phone.

  • You pull it out to check something quick,

  • but then all of a sudden, a half hour has gone by

  • while you were scrolling Instagram or whatever.

  • It's a real problem.

  • But it's a problem I didn't really have

  • with the galaxy Fold,

  • because when I was just using the tiny screen,

  • I wanted to get something done and put it away really fast.

  • 'Cause the tiny is not that good.

  • But then when I unfolded it and used it,

  • I was really using it. I had to hold it in two hands,

  • it became an active thing that I chose to be doing.

  • It required some intentionality.

  • So I ended up feeling better

  • about how I was using this phone

  • than I usually do when I use a regular phone.

  • That is the reason to get a folding phone

  • that turns into a little tablet.

  • You have a big immersive screen for phone apps

  • when you're using it intentionally,

  • and you keep everything else short and quick

  • and to be done with it, and you put it away.

  • Now, maybe this year, Samsung and Google are going to wow

  • me with big improvements for how Android works on tablets.

  • And we'll be talking about

  • using Android to to do tablety things

  • instead of just big immersive phones things.

  • But that's gonna have to wait for the full review.

  • My hunch right now though, is mostly what we talking about

  • very big phone apps that feel immersive,

  • and then a lot of split-screen stuff.

  • Which leads me to the dual screen idea of the Surface Duo.

  • Instead of folding glass, you have two separate screens

  • and a big gap in the middle.

  • And by the way, you're probably wondering

  • why I don't show you the device

  • with the screen on

  • and the bezels and how big they are

  • and just show you how everything works.

  • Well, I can't.

  • Microsoft has set the terms of this embargo

  • that lets me tell you everything I want

  • about the hardware itself,

  • but I can't give you anything that I've learned

  • from turning the screen on

  • until the full review.

  • Which is a choice, I guess,

  • but wait for the full review on this thing.

  • Besides we've already got hands on with the Microsoft Duo

  • showing the screen and how some of the software works.

  • Tom Warren got to look at this almost a year ago.

  • Okay.

  • So why would you want a device with two separate screens

  • in a three 60 hinge?

  • Well, a few reasons.

  • One, it has even more of that,

  • "I am done if I'm having to fold."

  • Because there's no screen on the outside at all.

  • More importantly though,

  • is it can be really thin.

  • When it's opened up, it's less than five millimeters thick.

  • It's actually like directly comparable

  • to my very super thin Kindle Oasis e-reader.

  • Plus the screen flips all the way around 360.

  • So then you can use it one handed like a phone.

  • Well maybe not quite one handed,

  • look how wide this thing is.

  • You'll need your second hand.

  • Anyway, the screen in phone mode is quite big.

  • You can also get a bunch of other modes,

  • like sort of a tablet with a gap, and like 10th mode,

  • and a book mode.

  • And Microsoft calls these postures.

  • Postures?

  • Is hinge the posture?

  • 'Cause that's my default posture,

  • is that hinge straight there?

  • Anyway.

  • The gap between the screens actually tells you

  • everything you need to know about what the Duo is about.

  • You're really not gonna want to stretch stuff

  • across these two screens all that often,

  • except for maybe like Kindle books.

  • No.

  • What this thing is for is running two apps side by side

  • and sometimes running one app

  • and then getting a big old thumb keyboard at the bottom.

  • Mostly though it's about multitasking.

  • How often do you wish

  • that you had two windows open on your phone?

  • Maybe you've never even thought of that,

  • but if you could,

  • maybe you would use your phone a little bit differently.

  • And that is Microsoft's bet.

  • That you really do want to have two apps open at once

  • more often than you realize.

  • Having it be two apps side-by-side

  • also gets around that whole Android apps