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  • Lions Aaron, iconic species of Africa and have the opportunity to work in a wild place like this and Thio actually be able to make a difference.

  • It's hard to describe how important it is to me in northern Botswana.

  • Lions move out of the delta because all the territories air occupied.

  • So as they move out, they get into these high conflict zones around these villages, where livestock are often the only food that the lions confined.

  • Yeah, that was really the genesis of pride in our pride's.

  • We knew we had to do something.

  • We're working with communities to help people coexist with these cats.

  • If livestock are killed, people are gonna be more motivated to go after the lions.

  • So it's really about helping people protect their livestock and, in the end, protect lions.

  • Mhm.

  • The early warning system is based on the satellite tracking collars that we put on the cats so we can warn the village that ah, particular lion is approaching at a particular time, so make sure that your livestock are protected.

  • We're closing in on one of our Lion Ness's, which we hope to call her tonight.

  • My anger is one of the lines that we started the program with about a year and a half ago, when we put out our first satellite collars.

  • She was one of our target animals because we know she's one of the individuals that likely moves into this floodplain.

  • With that conflict.

  • Interface happens well.

  • The footage we're collecting is to learn more about line behaviors on particularly things that interactions with cattle are coming into community properties.

  • A caller will go on the line and the collars meant to stay for a couple of years.

  • This is the critter cam.

  • Critter Cam is a short term tool.

  • It's only meant to stay for a few days on.

  • There's an animal walks around.

  • The camera hangs below the battery pack.

  • My Yanga made it back in July 1 of the things that we had in mind is that she's likely with Cubs that are about 3 to 4 weeks old and she's not.

  • She's not.

  • She's really close.

  • Yeah, I'm looking at thes cheese, but I would like to go this sizes and just maybe we can get behind picks direction.

  • How is it So we gain past great, too.

  • She is.

  • I'm the term right now and she's walking in the open.

  • Erica E think I saw the collar.

  • It's a redress.

  • It's a reverse it together.

  • Her.

  • There she goes, right?

  • Vet didn't hesitate.

  • Yeah, we had a bit of an operation to try to make sure that she was safe, that the Cubs were safe and that we were able to swap the callers quickly.

  • Outflow.

  • Outflow.

  • Oh, that.

  • Yes, animals wake up like that during anesthesia is different animals and their impulses to get away.

  • Hello.

  • She's obviously has some adrenaline to try.

  • Toe fight the drug.

  • She's big.

  • She's got a big belly.

  • I think she's down.

  • But listen, when she wakes up, she is not going to eat us.

  • Mhm, but not that quickly.

  • Let me put it that way and look at the stomach.

  • Nobody ever said Yes.

  • Bad explains why she doesn't want to go down.

  • Maybe that she's heavily pregnant because they tend to then fight the drug tremendously.

  • Since we hadn't seen the Cubs in that moment and she had a full full belly, you know, we're starting to second guess ourselves.

  • What's going on?

  • She actually still pregnant.

  • You may actually see something in the critter cam.

  • Mhm eso as we're watching this footage, she's doing what lions do.

  • Basically rest.

  • And then there's the cups.

  • Oh, my God.

  • You gotta be kidding me.

  • Way.

  • See this little fuzz ball in the corner?

  • And this small cubs starts moving towards her.

  • It signals.

  • Later in the footage, we start to see two cubs come out.

  • Oh, that covers a least three weeks old.

  • So then it means that she had So we had the date right?

  • A few weeks old, just as we had previously predicted.

  • And then they start toe play and tumble on each other.

  • It doesn't get better than this.

  • This is exactly what we're looking for.

  • Oh, man.

  • We were so surprised and happy have that confirmation of the Cubs to see them so healthy and to get that inside view at that early stage is hugely valuable.

  • Nothing.

  • What?

  • We've already started using this footage and it's been edited down.

  • It's the villages that actually name the individual lions in our study.

  • And we've gone to some of these communities to be able to show them Oh, you know, my nga, she's actually has cubs.

  • And when there's a trigger of our early warning system.

  • When she starts approaching, the village will be able to send messages using that name.

  • The critic cams help us personalized and individualized.

  • These cats, people who live in these villages close to the lions that have just basically a negative association.

  • Lions mean dead cattle.

  • They get this window into the lives of these lions, and they get to see them in a different context.

  • We hope that this helps drastically reduce the killing of livestock, drastically reduce the killing of lions and create greater tolerance and to create greater connection.

  • And then we hope that that helps us get closer to coexistence.

  • Mhm!

  • Yeah, Yeah!

  • Mhm, right.

Lions Aaron, iconic species of Africa and have the opportunity to work in a wild place like this and Thio actually be able to make a difference.

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Coexisting With the Lions of Botswana | National Geographic

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/03
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