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  • Claudia Romeo: We're in Bury, Lancashire, England,

  • and we're about to visit a black pudding company.

  • Black pudding is that one item

  • in an English breakfast plate

  • that you either love or hate.

  • Why?

  • Because it has blood in it.

  • But it is also that one item

  • that has the most history,

  • especially here in Lancashire,

  • which is known for being the county

  • that brought it to fame.

  • So it's time to see how it's made.

  • Let's go!

  • In Bury, we met with Richard Morris,

  • production director at the Bury Black Pudding Company.

  • His grandfather was a butcher,

  • and it is his black pudding recipe

  • that the company uses today.

  • Richard Morris: People have this idea of black pudding as,

  • it's all bits of animals and stuff.

  • There's no meat in a black pudding.

  • There's blood in a black pudding,

  • but there's no meat. It's cereal-based.

  • Claudia: Black pudding starts with a dry mix

  • of pig blood, seasoning,

  • rusk, and oatmeal.

  • And when we say dry, we mean this.

  • Seriously? [laughs]

  • Richard: Yeah.

  • You'd never guess. It's actually a dried blood.

  • So, if you smell that, what would you...?

  • Claudia: Yeah, it just smells like herbs.

  • Yeah, it smells like the seasoning.

  • Richard: Yeah, the seasoning.

  • Claudia: There's no blood, any blood smell at all.

  • Richard: No, it's a nice aroma.

  • And we use dried blood

  • because it's developed to a certain parameter,

  • so it's very safe, food safe.

  • Claudia: What is the difference

  • with liquid blood?

  • Richard: It's much more consistent.

  • Using fresh blood, that can change

  • with different animals, what they've been fed on.

  • So this is very consistent product,

  • which fits what we do.

  • We also have rusk then,

  • which is breadcrumbed flour,

  • used heavily in manufacture of sausage.

  • That's what gives sausage a fluffy texture.

  • Claudia: Oh, I see.

  • Richard: And we also have oatmeal as well.

  • So, oatmeal that's been ground,

  • so it's a fine oatmeal.

  • And that, again, if you added water to that,

  • it would go a bit stiffer.

  • So the two together make a nice texture.

  • Claudia: Oh, yeah, 'cause they complement each other.

  • Richard: Yeah, exactly.

  • I think heavily in England,

  • especially north of England,

  • anything that's got lumps in it,

  • you gotta bite two or three times.

  • They call it gristle round here.

  • [Claudia laughs] Chorizo and that sort of

  • sausage are quite firm,

  • and that's more European.

  • Around here, especially north of England,

  • it needs to be soft and very palatable.

  • Claudia: OK, so that is the taste.

  • Richard: Yeah, just regional things.

  • Claudia: Regional taste.

  • Another two ingredients

  • are barley and fat.

  • Unlike the rusk, oatmeal, and blood,

  • they will be cooked

  • before being added to the dry mix.

  • Richard: The barley itself comes in loose like this.

  • When we cook it up in these,

  • we leave room for it. It will swell up

  • to about three, four times the size.

  • Claudia: Oh, wow.

  • Looks like a Christmas sock.

  • Richard: [laughs] Yeah, yeah. Claudia: It does!

  • Richard: This is pork fat,

  • so if you think of a pork chop,

  • where the meat is, the white piece of fat there,

  • this comes in from Denmark,

  • where they have fatter pigs.

  • In England, the pig, the fat's like this.

  • So we don't have fat pigs.

  • So this white piece of fat,

  • it comes in, in strips,

  • which we have here.

  • Claudia: Oh, wow.

  • I didn't even notice that.

  • It looks like textile, you know?

  • Richard: That's it, yeah.

  • So, we got a strip there.

  • Claudia: Oh, no, it does look like meat, actually.

  • Richard: And then this is then diced.

  • So, this is the high quality.

  • There is no lean meat on this at all.

  • So we're just after the fat.

  • Claudia: And this one is gonna be cooked, yeah?

  • Richard: Yeah, we dice it on a machine.

  • We weigh it into the stocking net again.

  • So we, from here... Claudia: Ooh, another sock.

  • Richard: We take it up, from there,

  • and we pop it into that.

  • Claudia: And this one is gonna shrink, or?

  • Richard: Yes, it will just shrink slightly

  • as it starts to give the moisture

  • out of it, and the flavor.

  • The barley expands.

  • This just reduces slightly, yeah.

  • Claudia: And one net is for one batch?

  • Richard: Into a mix, there's four nets

  • go into a mix. Yeah.

  • I'm giving you my recipe right now. [laughs]

  • Claudia: OK, wow.

  • Might have to write this down then. [laughs]

  • Richard: Yeah. No, no, don't do that.

  • Claudia: Barley and fat are cooked

  • for one hour.

  • Meanwhile, onion and water are mixed

  • in this giant container.

  • When ready, they will be joined

  • by the dry mix,

  • containing blood, oatmeal, and rusk.

  • Richard: And then there's a motor on here.

  • Basically, it will just,

  • it's like when you whisk something up,

  • but this does it 4,500 revs.

  • So it just whisks it up really quick,

  • and basically we rehydrate the product,

  • so you've got, like, a gravy consistency,

  • where the dry blood's in it,

  • the seasoning, the rusk, the oatmeal,

  • the flour, the onions,

  • and you've got your base mix there.

  • Claudia: OK. So, wait, this one

  • is the barley that you were showing me earlier.

  • Richard: Yeah. Claudia: Wow, and it's grown

  • so much in size, you were right.

  • Richard: Yeah, this is the barley you saw previously.

  • If I pick one up,

  • you'll see exactly the same, from there.

  • See how it's swollen up?

  • Now, that's cooked perfectly.

  • Claudia: So, this one is about,

  • it was, like, 2 1/2 kilos,

  • and now it is?

  • Richard: Yeah, it's about 10 kilos now.

  • Claudia: Wow.

  • Richard: We weight check it, so it's right.

  • If that was overcooked, it'd be 11, 12 kilos.

  • We wouldn't use that.

  • Claudia: So Christmas sock before Christmas,

  • and Christmas sock after.

  • Richard: Exactly, yeah, exactly.

  • Wow, this is like a gym test.

  • Claudia: I know, I can see you with a couple -

  • Richard: [laughing] And I'm shaking.

  • Claudia: And you can do, like, a lunge thing, no?

  • Richard: Yeah.

  • Claudia: So, I see something else in here, though.

  • There's not just barley.

  • Richard: Well, this is fat, diced fat,

  • that we showed you earlier.

  • Again, this has been cooked up,

  • if you notice it's not swollen up,

  • it's just cooked out,

  • and it actually loses the bits.

  • We only use, in our products, only 3% fat,

  • and those are the actual

  • small, white pieces you see in the end product.