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  • June 8, 2010,

  • Russell Wilson, fourth-round pick to the Colorado Rockies baseball.

  • I'm fired up,

  • one of the highest moments of my life.

  • Every kid's dream to be drafted by a Major League Baseball team.

  • June 8, 2010.

  • June 9, 2010 --

  • (Imitating flatline sound)

  • The line goes flat.

  • My dad passes away.

  • The highest of the high

  • to the lowest of the low.

  • Just like that.

  • My dad laying in his deathbed,

  • just tears running down my face,

  • you know, what do I do next?

  • My mind racing, memories, flashbacks, moments,

  • early mornings, getting up,

  • taking grounders and throwing,

  • speed outs and deep post routes to my brother and my dad,

  • to early morning car rides to AAU baseball,

  • to my dad being the third-base coach.

  • Fast-forward to the championship high of winning a Super Bowl,

  • holding up the Lombardi Trophy

  • and the emotions and the excitement of it all,

  • blue and green confetti all over the place

  • and knowing that you just won the Super Bowl,

  • to a year later, the pressure of the game,

  • the ball on the one-yard line,

  • and this is the chance to win the game, and it doesn't work.

  • And however many millions and millions of people

  • all over the world watching.

  • And having to walk to the media,

  • and what do I say next, what do I do, what do I think?

  • Being married at a young age

  • and just coming out of college and everything else,

  • to, you know, shortly after, marriage not working out

  • and realizing, you know what?

  • Life happens.

  • Life happens, life happens to all of us.

  • Loss of family members, divorce,

  • fear, pain, depression, concerns, worries.

  • When you think about being superpositive --

  • yes, I'm positive by nature,

  • but positivity, you know, it doesn't always work,

  • because when you're down 16-nothing in an NFC championship game,

  • and people are like,

  • "Russ, we're not going to be able to win this game, man,

  • it's not a great situation right now,"

  • or when you're facing cancer,

  • or when you have things you have to deal with

  • or finances and this and that,

  • like, how do we deal with it?

  • It's hard to be positive in the midst of it all.

  • And what I definitely knew was this:

  • that negativity works 100 percent of the time.

  • Negativity was going to get me nowhere.

  • I started saying to myself, "New are his mercies every morning,"

  • new beginnings, new starts.

  • And despite hardship and pain and worries and wanting to get through it

  • and "How do I do this?",

  • I started thinking about a car.

  • You know how when you drive a car, you've got stick shift

  • and you want to shift to neutral?

  • You go from first gear to second gear, all the way to fifth?

  • You've got to know how to shift to neutral.

  • And I needed to shift to neutral immediately, before I crashed.

  • Sitting there after the Super Bowl,

  • I had a decision to make:

  • Will I let this define my career? Will I let it define my life?

  • Hell, no.

  • What I found out was this: that mindset is a skill.

  • It can be taught and learned.

  • I started 10 years ago, training my mind,

  • with this guy named Trevor Moawad, my mental conditioning coach.

  • He's been with me for 10 years,

  • and we've been best friends and partners ever since.

  • As athletes, we train the body,

  • we train ourselves to be able to run fast, throw farther, jump higher

  • and do these different things,

  • but why don't we train our mind?

  • What do you want your life to look like?

  • Write it out, talk about it, say it.

  • What's our language, what does it look like,

  • watch these highlights, Russell, when you're in your best moments.

  • What does that look like?

  • And be that, live that, sound like that.

  • The best free throw shooters,

  • they don't worry about the shot they just missed.

  • They think about this shot,

  • this putt, this throw, this first down.

  • Then I met this kid Milton Wright, 19 years old,

  • he had cancer three different times.

  • This day when I went to see him, he was frustrated,

  • "Russ, I'm done, I don't want to do this anymore,

  • it's my time to go."

  • I started telling him this story about my dad,

  • how he used to say, "Son, why not you?

  • Why don't you graduate early, play pro football and pro baseball?

  • Why not you, why not you?"

  • I said, "Milton, why not you?

  • If you tried T-cell therapy,

  • and you try this and it doesn't work,

  • you won't remember it."

  • So Milton got a smile on his face and said,

  • "You're exactly right.

  • Yes, I do have cancer, Russ.

  • But I can either let this kill me,

  • not just physically,

  • but I can also let it kill me emotionally and mentally.

  • And I have a choice right now, in the midst of the problem,

  • in the midst of the storm,

  • to decide to overcome."

  • One of the questions I always get asked about neutral thinking is this:

  • "Does that mean I don't have any emotion?"

  • And I always say, absolutely not.

  • Yeah, we have emotions,

  • we have real-life situations,

  • we have things to deal with.

  • But what you have to be able to do is to stay focused on the moment

  • and to not be superemotional.

  • It's OK to have emotions, but don't be emotional.

  • When people look at me,

  • they see that I'm the highest-paid player in the NFL,

  • they see that I have the girl and Ciara,

  • that I have the family and this and that.

  • But I still have real-life situations.

  • We all do.

  • We all have, you know, sadness and loss

  • and depression and worries and fear.

  • I didn't just get here.

  • What's the truth,

  • and how do I come through this better?

  • And that's really, kind of, how my mind started shifting.

  • It was not just on the success of it all or the failure of it,

  • it was on the process, like:

  • What is the next step, how do I do this right here, right now?

  • We have a choice to make in life.

  • And for me, when I was young and I didn't have much,

  • I made a choice.

  • I made a choice that I was going to believe

  • that great things were going to happen,

  • that I was going to have my mindset right,

  • and I was going to have the right language

  • and the right things to think about,

  • which helped prepare me for today.

  • Because I'm just human.

  • I just have the ability to throw the ball a long way

  • and run around and make some cool and fun throws

  • and make some people smile.

  • But the reality is that I still have pressure,

  • I still have worries, I still have fears,

  • I still have things that happen.

  • Still have loss.

  • Positivity can be dangerous.

  • But what always works is negativity.

  • I never wanted to live in negativity,

  • so I stayed in neutral.

  • I kept my shift in neutral.

  • And so that's where I lived,

  • and that's where I've been living ever since.

June 8, 2010,

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My secret to staying focused under pressure | Russell Wilson

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/02
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