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  • Saida Aden Said: I still have this horrific image in my mind.

  • I could see people falling down,

  • gunshots.

  • I was so terrified.

  • Really, I was crying a lot.

  • Someone who knew my father and my mom grabbed my hand, and he said,

  • "Let's go! Let's go! Let's go!"

  • And I was like, "Where's my mom? My mom? My mom?"

  • Noria Dambrine Dusabireme: During nights we would hear shots,

  • we would hear guns.

  • Elections were supposed to happen.

  • We had young people going in the street,

  • they were having strikes.

  • And most of the young people died.

  • SAS: We boarded a vehicle.

  • It was overloaded.

  • People were running for their lives.

  • That is how I fled from Somalia.

  • My mom missed me.

  • Nobody told her where I went.

  • NDD: The fact that we did not go to school,

  • we couldn't go to the market, we were just stuck home

  • made me realize that if I got an option to go for something better,

  • I could just go for it and have a better future.

  • (Music)

  • Ignazio Matteini: Globally, displaced people in the world

  • have been increasing.

  • Now there are almost 60 million people displaced in the world.

  • And unfortunately, it doesn't stop.

  • Chrystina Russell: I think the humanitarian community

  • is starting to realize from research and reality

  • that we're talking about a much more permanent problem.

  • Baylie Damtie Yeshita: These students, they need a tertiary education,

  • a degree that they can use.

  • If the students are living now in Rwanda,

  • if they get relocated, still they can continue their study.

  • Still, their degree is useful, wherever they are.

  • CR: Our audacious project was to really test

  • Southern New Hampshire University's Global Education Movement's

  • ability to scale,

  • to bring bachelor's degrees and pathways to employment

  • to refugees and those who would otherwise not have access to higher education.

  • SAS: It was almost impossible, as a refugee person,

  • to further my education and to make my career.

  • My name is Saida Aden Said,

  • and I am from Somalia.

  • I was nine years old when I came to Kakuma,

  • and I started going to school at 17.

  • Now I am doing my bachelor degree

  • with SNHU.

  • NDD: My name is Noria Dambrine Dusabireme.

  • I'm doing my bachelor of arts in communications

  • with a concentration in business.

  • CR: We are serving students across five different countries:

  • Lebanon, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda and South Africa.

  • Really proud to have 800 AA grads to over 400 bachelor's graduates

  • and nearly 1,000 students enrolled right now.

  • So, the magic of this is that we're addressing refugee lives as they exist.

  • There are no classes.

  • There are no lectures.

  • There are no due dates.

  • There are no final exams.

  • This degree is competency-based and not time-bound.

  • You choose when you start your project.

  • You choose how you're going to approach it.

  • NDD: When you open the platform, that's where you can see the goals.

  • Under each goal, we can find projects.

  • When you open a project, you get the competencies

  • that you have to master,

  • directions

  • and overview of the project.

  • CR: The secret sauce of SNHU

  • is combining that competency-based online learning

  • with the in-person learning that we do with partners

  • to provide all the wraparound supports.

  • That includes academic coaching.

  • It means psychosocial support,

  • medical support,

  • and it's also that back-end employment support

  • that's really resulting in the 95 percent graduation,

  • the 88 percent employment.

  • NDD: I'm a social media management intern.

  • It's related to the communications degree I'm doing.

  • I've learned so many things out of the project and in the real world.

  • CR: The structured internship is really an opportunity

  • for students to practice their skills,

  • for us to create connections between that internship

  • and a later job opportunity.

  • (Music)

  • This is a model that really stops putting time

  • and university policies and procedures at the center

  • and instead puts the student at the center.

  • IM: The SNHU model is a big way to shake the tree.

  • Huge.

  • It's a huge shake to the traditional way of having tertiary education here.

  • BDY: It can transform the lives of students

  • from these vulnerable and refugee communities.

  • NDD: If I get the degree,

  • I can just come back and work everywhere that I want.

  • I can go for a masters confidently in English,

  • which is something that I would not have dreamt of before.

  • And I have the confidence and the skills required

  • to actually go out and just tackle the workplace

  • without having to fear that I can't make it.

  • SAS: I always wanted to work with the community.

  • I want to establish a nonprofit.

  • We advocate for women's education.

  • I want to be someone who is, like, an ambassador

  • and encourage them to learn

  • and tell them it is never too late.

  • It's a dream.

Saida Aden Said: I still have this horrific image in my mind.

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B1 education bachelor degree employment project mom

A path to higher education and employment for refugees | Chrystina Russell

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/02
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