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  • Transcriber: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Camille Martínez

  • You might think that working remotely is an introvert's dream:

  • you're in your own home hidden behind a computer,

  • possibly in your pajamas.

  • But the truth is,

  • for many introverts, remote work is kind of a nightmare.

  • [TED: The Way We Work]

  • [Made possible with the support of Dropbox]

  • Now that the pandemic has chased many of us out of our offices,

  • we're chafing under the new remote rules of work:

  • too much screen time;

  • a lack of boundaries between work and home;

  • endless video calls.

  • The same things that make remote work difficult for introverts

  • make it difficult for everyone.

  • Far and away, the worst part of remote work is video calls.

  • Being on camera is a performance.

  • Thoughtless scheduling can mean you're basically onstage performing

  • for eight hours a day.

  • There are none of the nuanced cues that help you read a room.

  • Staring at disembodied heads on a screen

  • offers only a pale imitation of real human connection.

  • Social anxiety only makes this worse.

  • When you have a camera in your face,

  • that can really trigger your social anxiety.

  • It takes energy to be on.

  • So the key to managing remote work is to protect your energy.

  • First, pay attention to ritual and routine.

  • As much as we hated our commutes,

  • they were a ritual that created a boundary between work and home.

  • And we need that.

  • For many of us, those little breaks that we would build in to the work day --

  • going to get a cup of coffee or a chat with a coworker --

  • those are gone, too.

  • For me, those rituals are when I gather my energy,

  • assume my work character

  • and get into the right headspace

  • to dive in.

  • So how can you recreate those breaks and boundaries at home?

  • The key is to be intentional.

  • It could be music or lighting,

  • a pep talk with a friend.

  • You could take a walk around the block at a certain time of day

  • or even a breathing or stretching routine

  • before you sit --

  • whatever it takes for you to delineate the transition

  • between work and home.

  • Second, we need to manage our pace, place and space.

  • You can think of pacing as managing the interactions

  • that tax your energy

  • versus those that recharge you.

  • You could schedule fewer videoconferences,

  • because remember, those are performances.

  • You could schedule downtime or recharge time after performances.

  • Oprah does this,

  • as do many introverted performers and CEOs.

  • You could consider the time of day.

  • Think about when you can typically summon the energy to be on

  • and save other times for quiet work.

  • For place, use your workspace

  • to help you enforce good boundaries.

  • Even if your desk is in your kitchen,

  • make it feel like a workplace.

  • For space, build in some alone time every day.

  • And this includes time away from your kids.

  • It's really key to avoiding burnout.

  • Finally, if you're a manager,

  • you have a special role to play

  • to help employees protect their pace, place and space.

  • Manage the room during video calls.

  • Even remotely, chatty extroverts tend to dominate.

  • To create a space where everyone can be heard,

  • structure agendas,

  • assign presentation rules

  • and minimize brainstorming.

  • Brainstorming can trigger social anxiety,

  • and it can freeze up introverts.

  • Instead, create a shared space where people can write their ideas

  • before a brainstorming session.

  • Favor audio over video calls.

  • Research shows that we actually communicate more emotion and nuance

  • via audio alone.

  • Try asynchronous communication

  • for more complicated or provocative one-on-ones.

  • You can steal this idea from author Robert Glazer:

  • record a voice memo or video on your phone explaining your perspective

  • and send it to a colleague.

  • And that way, they can respond and react in their own time.

  • Along with a lot of challenges now,

  • we have an opportunity.

  • Remote work is here to stay,

  • so don't just transfer old habits and old company culture

  • to remote work.

  • Build something better.

  • To get started,

  • ask the introverts in your office what their ideal day looks like

  • and take your cue from there.

Transcriber: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Camille Martínez

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B1 remote social anxiety brainstorming energy space recharge

3 steps to stop remote work burnout | The Way We Work, a TED series

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/02
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