Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Barbecue time.

  • Ronnie.

  • Do you like barbecues?

  • Oh yes, they're delicious.

  • You eat some meat, you eat some vegetables, hey, eat whatever you want.

  • We're not doing the food thing here, are we?

  • I'm a chef.

  • So, I'm going to teach you both some barbecue basics and - hey, enjoy!

  • Eat some meat, grill it up.

  • Look at all these words, this is crazy.

  • So, we have - the original word is barbecue.

  • We like to shorten it to BBQ, but we don't actually say "BBQ", that's kind of strange.

  • We actually still say barbecue.

  • This is a variation of the spelling as well.

  • To me, this looks like it's French, but apparently it's a Spanish word in origin.

  • And then we can also write it Bar-b-q.

  • How lazy are you?

  • I'm going to write it like this - BBQ, but say barbecue just to make life interesting.

  • Fire up the grill!

  • So, a very confusing thing is the word barbecue itself.

  • So, barbecue can be a party.

  • Like, oh, come to my house, have a barbecue.

  • It can also be the thing that we use to cook the food on.

  • Properly, we should call it - oh, I lost my hat - a grill.

  • But we don't say, "Oh, I'm going to go the barbecue.

  • I hope Kevin has a good grill."

  • We call it a barbecue.

  • But if you want to call it a grill, go ahead.

  • Fire up the grill.

  • This means hey, get that thing hot because I'm going to come and slap my sausage on your

  • grill.

  • We have two very important choices when we're doing this.

  • Gas - which is usually propane, or charcoal.

  • Now, charcoal is a black coal made from pre-burnt wood.

  • Why is it called coal?

  • I don't know.

  • Char means burnt.

  • So, my personal favorite is charcoal because it has the flavor that we all enjoy.

  • But a lot of people in Canada and in America, for some reason, they're using gas.

  • To me, it just tastes like making it in your house.

  • So, Ronnie's always going to have some charcoal on hand.

  • Get your hands dirty, get it all over your face.

  • That's a barbecue.

  • So, if you have a gas grill, okay, very easy.

  • Phrasal verb number one, you're going to turn on the gas.

  • Or, with this phrasal verb you can also say, "Turn the gas on".

  • So, with these phrasal verbs in English, you have a choice.

  • You can put the noun between the verb and the preposition.

  • Verb and preposition, or if you'd like, you can put it at the end of the phrasal verb.

  • So, I can say, "Turn off the gas", or if I wanted to, I could say, "Turn the gas off".

  • Honesty, it makes no difference, okay?

  • Some do it - Oh, but if it's this, it's - No, same, same, same.

  • So, if you have charcoal however, there's some steps.

  • There're some things you have to do.

  • The first one is you have to ignite - fire - you have to light it up.

  • So, you have to light the charcoal.

  • I recommend some gas, not too much though.

  • Or some lighter fluid.

  • Something alcoholic - nope, I don't recommend alcohol.

  • You've got to drink that, it's a barbecue.

  • You can use oil if you don't have anything, but something that catches on fire, you're

  • going to need to help you out for your barbecue.

  • Now, a gas barbecue, easy.

  • Press a button, it turns on.

  • Hey, when you're finished your barbecue, you press a button, you turn it off.

  • But not with charcoal, no, no.

  • So, you light it up and then when you're finished cooking, you're going to put out the fire.

  • Again, I can say "Put the fire out".

  • This means you extinguish or kill the fire, because you don't want a fire in your park

  • or wherever you're having your delicious barbecue.

  • Now, you've got to do a little prep.

  • Prep is the sort form for "preparation", so this means you gotta spend some time in your

  • kitchen.

  • A lot of people marinate their meat, wow.

  • Now, we must be careful because, what is meat?

  • Somebody would just say, "I'm having meat."

  • Okay, there are many different kinds of meat, so maybe you're having beef.

  • So you have to be specific and say, "We're having beef."

  • Pork, which is pig.

  • Chicken is chicken.

  • Maybe you can have some lamb, ribs.

  • The next thing you're going to do is you're going to cut up the vegetables.

  • So again, "cut up" is a phrasal verb.

  • You can say, "Cut up the veggies", which is short for vegetables.

  • Oh!

  • Or, you can say, "Cut the vegetables up."

  • Again, it doesn't matter.

  • What's your favorite marinade for meat?

  • A marinade is usually something that has a very strong flavor.

  • You keep the meat in it for a couple of hours or overnight, so the meat absorbs the flavor.

  • And it tastes delicious on the grill.

  • Next up, what happens when you're actually cooking?

  • What is that person doing over there in front of the hot grill?

  • Well, you have to make sure your food doesn't burn, and that it's cooked properly, because

  • nobody wants uncooked meat.

  • One thing you can do is you can flip the burgers over.

  • Or, because these are phrasal verbs, you can flip over the burgers.

  • This means you turn them from one side to the other.

  • If you're a very talented chef, maybe you can be - da da da, flip them over, hah!

  • I don't recommend that.

  • It's probably going to fall, so don't be fancy.

  • Just flip over the burgers, okay?

  • Or, you can say, turn over.

  • So, flip over and turn over is the same.

  • You can turn over the steaks or you can turn the steaks over.

  • Again, you're cooking one side to the other.

  • Because no one wants a half-cooked steak.

  • Nah, not even I. I - I'd try it but I - no, I wouldn't.

  • After all the fun happens, you eat all the delicious food, drink all the delicious drinks,

  • there's a big job ahead of you.

  • You have to clean up.

  • And "clean up" is a phrasal verb.

  • I don't know why it's up.

  • You can't clean down.

  • Very simply, I could take out "up" and I could just say "Clean the area".

  • So this means, please people, when you go to a park or wherever you're having a barbecue,

  • don't leave your garbage in the grass.

  • I hate this.

  • You're walking through the park or cycling through the park and there's garbage.

  • Ronnie gets so mad.

  • Pick up your garbage, come on people.

  • Another thing you're going to do is you're going to pick up the empty cans or whatever

  • you're drinking.

  • Please don't leave them on the ground.

  • Recycle them, put them in the garbage, take them home, make an aircraft out of them.

  • I don't know, do something.

  • Just please don't leave them in the park.

  • Pick up the empty cans.

  • Throw out the garbage, okay.

  • So, throwing something out means to put something in the garbage.

  • Last thing you're going to do to keep your grill in tip top shape is you're going to

  • scrape down the grill.

  • If you scrape something down, it means you clean it.

  • It makes that sound.

  • And you're just cleaning the grill.

  • So again, I can say, "Scrape down the grill", or "Scrape the grill down".

  • Are you hungry?

  • Do you want some barbecue sauce, get it all over your face, eat it all up?

  • Eat up, drink up, remember, phrasal verbs are terrible in English, but you can actually

  • have fun using them and have a barbecue.

  • Oh, hold on.

  • I'm out of here.

  • I smell some meat.

  • I'm done.

  • Bye!

Barbecue time.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 barbecue grill phrasal meat charcoal gas

Learn English Phrasal Verbs: BBQ! “light up”, “put out”, “flip over”, “scrape down”...

  • 10 0
    Summer posted on 2020/10/31
Video vocabulary