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  • (upbeat music)

  • (alarm sounding)

  • - I'm Beryl.

  • And this week we're looking at breakfasts.

  • Let's go.

  • Breakfast wasn't always such a beloved meal.

  • In fact, in the middle ages in Europe,

  • it was considered an affront to God

  • to eat so early on in the day.

  • But then, in the 1600s, coffee and tea arrived in Europe

  • and things began to change.

  • Coffee smells so good.

  • (egg sizzling)

  • Then came the Industrial Revolution

  • and people needed an actual full meal in the morning

  • to get them through a big day of labor.

  • I broke the yolk.

  • Whatever.

  • Kellogg and Post then came onto the scene.

  • Toasters were invented.

  • Waffle irons were invented.

  • Breakfast became a huge thing, quickly.

  • Oh.

  • (Beryl laughs)

  • Hi buddy.

  • Oh my god, he can't have my breakfast.

  • Yeah.

  • To be fair, that history lesson

  • was really just about the US and Europe.

  • But around the world breakfast is important.

  • And the foods vary wildly country to country.

  • And personally, breakfast is my favorite meal of the day,

  • so I really wanted to make this episode.

  • I got to speak to seven people in seven countries

  • to see what breakfast was like around the world.

  • So this is the breakfast episode.

  • In making this episode I decided two things.

  • One, I love eggs, but I'm not looking at egg-led breakfasts.

  • So no omelets, or frittatas, or quiches.

  • That was my choice.

  • And two, I'm looking at breakfast to redefine

  • my narrow Western scope of what breakfast is.

  • Before we begin, I wanna say this,

  • I know that seven is a paltry number.

  • It really doesn't do justice to the amazing diversity

  • of breakfast foods around the world.

  • So I'm hoping that maybe the comment section

  • can look a bit like a breakfast menu.

  • Let me know what breakfast is like where you live.

  • And if you know an amazing recipe, leave it,

  • because I love cooking and I will totally try.

  • Okay.

  • I hope you guys enjoy the video.

  • Let's do it.

  • (dynamic music)

  • - [Aneri] Breakfast is a savory meal

  • where I live in Bharuch.

  • And we can make it more spicy if you like it

  • and less spicy if you don't like it.

  • - [Darius] We could eat grits in the South

  • just about every day.

  • It is a very popular breakfast food.

  • (Thuy speaking a foreign language)

  • (Daw speaking a foreign language)

  • (Stephen speaking a foreign language)

  • (Bedriye speaking a foreign language)

  • (Naji speaking in a foreign language)

  • - [Beryl] We're gonna begin in Vietnam

  • because this breakfast soup really challenged me

  • to rethink about what a breakfast food is.

  • We're beginning with eel soup.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (Thuy speaking a foreign language)

  • In Kenya, breakfast can be a simple affair,

  • but their versions of fried dough look way better

  • than anything I've tried here in New York.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (Stephen speaking a foreign language)

  • I believe that cheese is always a great idea for breakfast.

  • And then I found this dish from Turkey and I just...

  • We had to film it.

  • (dynamic music)

  • (Bedriye speaking a foreign language)

  • Breakfast in the US has serious range,

  • but it is way more than waffles and pancakes.

  • And in the South they do it right.

  • (dynamic music)

  • - Breakfast is a very important meal of the day.

  • However, when it comes to having grits,

  • it's typically something that you might see

  • happening more often on the weekend.

  • My name is Darius Williams and I live in Atlanta, Georgia.

  • A typical breakfast in the South includes fish and grits.

  • Although you can get grits pretty much all over the country,

  • they're very, very popular in lots of southern states

  • simply because grits come from the Native Americans,

  • and we sort of have adopted them in the South.

  • I learned how to make grits from watching my grandmother.

  • I would just literally sit in awe and watch her

  • as she caressed that pot of grits

  • into the creamy delicacy that it is.

  • For catfish and grits we're gonna take catfish filets.

  • And they're gonna get soaked in buttermilk

  • and then deep fried until

  • they're golden brown and delicious.

  • We're gonna put that on top of

  • some amazing, creamy, wonderful grits.

  • We're gonna do a little bit of tomato right on top.

  • 'Cause what else is Southern besides tomato,

  • catfish and grits with a little bit of cream.

  • It is to die for.

  • The most difficult part about making grits

  • is getting it to be the right consistency.

  • You can't rush it.

  • This is a thing of love.

  • When I think about what happens over a pot of grits,

  • it is hearing the laughter and the conversation

  • between all of our families sort of connecting

  • and spending time with each other.

  • I firmly believe that food and cooking

  • is the way to connect with your family.

  • - [Beryl] India has a lot of amazing dishes,

  • but the steamed ones from the south of the country

  • caught my eye.

  • (dynamic music)

  • - I'm making dhokla and patra today.

  • This breakfast is typical in my country.

  • My name is Aneri Chavan.

  • I live in Bharuch, India.

  • Dhokla is fermented rice and urad dal.

  • Patra is colocasia leaves,

  • which are coated with gram flour.

  • And it is steamed and also fried.

  • Dhokla is milder and patra is a spicier thing.

  • It takes eight to nine hours to make dhokla.

  • The most difficult part is the fermenting part.

  • When you have to mix it in the mixer,

  • the batter should have the desired consistency.

  • To achieve that, it is a bit difficult.

  • Patra's difficult part is coating them

  • with the gram flour,

  • and just binding them and folding them.

  • Any chance the fold gets open, then it of no fun.

  • Breakfast in my house is a sitting-down affair.

  • My son, my husband, we three have breakfast

  • in the morning together only, before leaving for the job.

  • These dishes are quite steamed and healthy,

  • so I liked them the most.

  • It gives you a lot of mileage to work for the entire day.

  • - [Beryl] Some have called this next breakfast from Lebanon

  • pizza-like, and I'm not sure that's the best description,

  • however, damn if it is not amazing.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (Naji speaking a foreign language)

  • The final breakfast dish is another soup.

  • This one is from Myanmar, and it has so many flavors

  • that it feels like the perfect dish

  • to set yourself up for the day.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (Daw speaking a foreign language)

  • I know that people always say

  • breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and it is,

  • but I don't think that we really execute on that.

  • I think a lot of times we're in a rush,

  • and we're kind of running out the door,

  • and breakfast is kind of an afterthought.

  • But I also know that on those days

  • when I do sit down, and I do eat a good meal,

  • and I eat it with somebody that I care about,

  • my family or my friends,

  • I feel like my day is better.

  • You have this moment where you're sharing a meal,

  • it's the first meal of your day,

  • and kind of the day is full of possibilities.

  • And sharing that with somebody before everything gets going,

  • kind of sets you up for a better day.