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  • Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil. Joining me is Catherine. Hello Catherine.

  • Hello Neil. Hello everybody. Yes, a sports story today and tennis player

  • Novak Djokovic has been disqualified from the US Open.

  • And don't forget, you've got to test yourself on the vocabulary from this

  • News Review. Go to our website at bbclearningenglish.com to find it.

  • Right. Let's hear more about that story about Novak Djokovic

  • from this BBC Sports report:

  • Yes. World tennis number one, Novak Djokovic,

  • is out of the US Open. He hit a ball in anger; it hit a line judge in

  • the neck. She's not seriously injured but he's been

  • asked to leave the US Open tournament.

  • OK. It's the story everyone's talking about. What vocabulary

  • have you picked out?

  • Yes, we have: 'kicked out', 'blown his or her or their chances' and 'fuel'.

  • 'Kicked out', 'blown his/her/their chances' and 'fuel'.

  • OK. Let's have a look at your first headline.

  • And we're starting in Russiathe

  • publication Russia Today says:

  • 'Kicked out' – forced to leave.

  • Yes, so we have two words here.

  • The first word: 'kicked' – K-I-C-K-E-D – and the second word 'out' – O-U-T.

  • 'Kicked out.'

  • Now, I know what 'kick' means, Catherine.

  • Yes? It means to hit something

  • pretty hard with your foot so... That's right.

  • Are we saying here that Novak Djokovic was 'kicked' so hard

  • he flew out of the US Open?

  • Like a footballer? Like a giant football.

  • Err... no. Clearly we're not saying that. But the idea

  • of being forciblyforcibly having to leave or move

  • is the idea of 'kick'. If you kick a football it moves, whether it wants to or

  • not, because you've used some force, and that's the idea here:

  • Novak Djokovic has been required to leave

  • forcefullynot with actual physical force

  • but he's got to go and he maywhether he wants to or not, he's going.

  • Now the idea of 'kicked out' also means that you have to leave

  • an organisation, an event, or some other kind of activity because

  • you've broken the rules. Now, here the ruleclearly there's a rule against

  • hitting umpires with balls and hitting balls in anger.

  • He broke that rule so he's required to leave. So, if you break a rule somewhere

  • Neil, you may be or you may get kicked out.

  • OK. Now, we've heard another word with a similar meaning: 'disqualify'.

  • So, why can't I just say 'disqualify'? What's different about 'kicked out'?

  • Well, 'disqualified' is more formal. It's a bit longer.

  • It's less dramatic than the idea of 'kick',

  • isn't it? So, newspapers like this because of the drama and because it's

  • more colloquial and because it's slightly shorter.

  • Meaning-wise, they're very similar but I would say that 'kick out',

  • as well as being informal, has a broader meaning.

  • So, if you get 'kicked out' of a meeting, you haven't been

  • disqualified because you haven't broken a set of

  • official rules and a meeting isn't a competitionbecause 'disqualify' is for

  • things like competitionsbut 'kicks' or 'kicks out' has a wider range

  • of uses for a wider range of situations. But it still means you've

  • done something wrong; you're going.

  • Right, I was in a bar

  • for the first time in months, recently. Nice!

  • Yeah. Having a nice quiet

  • drink, but somebody had got a little bit too excited perhaps:

  • they had a bit too much to drink, they're making lots of noise,

  • upsetting people, and the barman kicked him out. He got kicked out.

  • Yeah. If you 'kick somebody out'

  • or you can 'be kicked out' – often used in the passiveand it's not just

  • for physical places as well; you can get kicked out of a

  • Facebook group if you break the rules or if you upset

  • people. So, you can get kicked out of virtual

  • organisations and groups as well as real ones.

  • OK. Let's have a summary of that:

  • If you would like to learn more about phrasal verbs like

  • 'kicked out', we have the perfect programme for you,

  • don't we Catherine?

  • We do: The Grammar Game Show!

  • Don't miss itit's a lot of fun. Click the link.

  • OK. Let's see your second headline.

  • Yes and we're in the UK

  • now, with the Expressthe headline:

  • 'Blown his, her or their chances' – missed an opportunity.

  • Yes. Two words: B-L-O-W-N – 'blown' – that's the past participle

  • of the verb 'to blow'.

  • The second word: C-H-A-N-C-E-S – that's chances,

  • or as people like you pronounce it, Neil?

  • 'Chances'.

  • Yes, the North-South divide in the UK

  • and elsewhere. You will hear two pronunciations of this word:

  • 'chances' or 'chances'. You choose the one you like; they're both

  • easily understood.

  • I think it's probably most useful to think of the word

  • 'blow' here as an explosion.

  • Yes, it is. So, 'blow' is when you push

  • mouth out of yoursorryair out of your mouth, like...

  • if you're blowing on hot soup, for example. But we also talk about things

  • 'blowing up' if there's an explosion:

  • something, another word to describe... a synonym for explode is blow up

  • and this is right. This is the better way to think of it.

  • He had an opportunity. The opportunity is gone

  • and it didn't just fade away: it went

  • instantly. It went spectacularly: it was dramatic, it was exciting, it was

  • big, it was shocking and that's the idea. If you blow your chances,

  • you really really do something that just makes

  • the chancethe opportunitygone, gone, gone.

  • Yeah. Normally of course, there would... Have you ever blown your...?

  • ...be a pronoun in there: we would say 'blown his chances',

  • but because it's a headline, as we know,

  • words go missing, don't they?

  • Yes, that's right. Yes, the headline has

  • taken out the pronoun 'his' but generally you blow 'your' chances,

  • or he blows 'his' chances, or she has blown 'her' chances and Neil, I expect

  • you have blown your chances of doing something once or twice in your life,

  • have you?

  • Well, a long time ago when I was in a

  • different job, I had the opportunity for a promotion.

  • However, for some strange reason I was quite argumentative in a

  • meeting once... critical, No??

  • very critical of my boss in a very...

  • I find that very hard to believeyou

  • criticising people in meetings, Neil...!

  • Very, very publicly. And my boss didn't really like this.

  • Funnily enough, I didn't get that promotion.

  • No...! I blew my chance.

  • With your poor behaviour in meetings, you

  • blew your chances of a promotion.

  • I blew it.

  • You blew it.

  • Yeah, that's a shortened... And that's another way...

  • That's a shortened version, isn't it, of 'to blow your chances' –

  • just 'to blow it'. Exactly, yes.

  • We often say, 'Don't blow it!' as a warning to people

  • when they're doing really well at

  • something and we knowwe're trying to say:

  • don't get over excited, don't get overconfident, don't do

  • anything stupid, don't blow it. It means don't spoil

  • this opportunity.

  • You've got a penalty in the last minute of the World Cup final...

  • ...don't blow it. Don't blow it!

  • Very easy to blow it in that situation.

  • OK. Let's have a summary:

  • If you like stories about sport and exercise and keeping fit, we have a great

  • one for you.

  • We do. And you can find that story by

  • just clicking the link.

  • It's about running marathons and how they can add years to your life.

  • OK. Your next headline, please.

  • And we're in Australia nowthe Sydney Morning Herald.

  • It's an opinion piece. It reads like this:

  • 'Fuel' – make more intense.

  • Yes. F-U-E-L – 'fuel'. Now, you know what fuel is, don't you Neil?

  • So, I'm a little bit confused here,

  • Catherine; I thought fuel was something you put in your car

  • to make it go, like petrol or diesel, or wood or coal

  • that you would put on a fire, but here this is a verb. So, what's happening?

  • What's happening?? Yes, so you're right:

  • 'fuel' is something that provides energy or power.

  • That's the key to this. Now, if we make it a... a verb form:

  • if you fuel something, you provide

  • energy or power. Now, we're not talking about

  • coal or electricity here, but we are talking about

  • sort of mental energy in the form of motivation.

  • So, where petrol makes a car move forwardwhat this commentator is

  • saying is that criticism will provide energy

  • for Novak Djokovic to perform even better. And some of us are like this,

  • aren't we Neil? If I say to you: 'You can't make that programme any better!'

  • you will go away and you'll probably make it better, because

  • you thrive on people saying you can't do something.

  • Am I right?

  • You're probably right, yes. So, it's probably useful to think of

  • Novak Djokovic here as a fire and the criticism

  • as a log, a piece of wood that you throw onto the fire.

  • The fire becomes more intense.

  • Exactly that, yeah. Good explanation.