Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Though different types of bread

  • require different ingredients and ratios,

  • flour or meal and water are always the main ingredients.

  • With over 20 types of bread on our list,

  • from flatbread to cornbread,

  • let's take a look at bread from places all around the world.

  • For those with a gluten intolerance,

  • injera is a great option

  • because, traditionally, it uses teff flour.

  • The spongy flatbread is multipurpose,

  • used as a utensil, a plate,

  • and a nutritious accompaniment to your food.

  • Paired with doro wat,

  • injera is the national dish of Ethiopia.

  • Though the ingredients for a baguette are simple,

  • what truly makes a baguette special

  • are the hands that prepare it and the time it takes.

  • Once the dough is rolled and scored

  • with a sharp blade or knife, it's baked.

  • The important part of a baguette

  • is the crunchy exterior, but fluffy interior.

  • Though pan Cubano shares many similarities to French bread

  • or Italian bread, a key difference,

  • and what makes pan Cubano pan Cubano, is lard.

  • Lard gives pan Cubano its smoothness,

  • taking the Cubano sandwich to the next level.

  • Each region of Georgia has different shapes of khachapuri

  • and uses different types of cheese.

  • The one featured here is called adjaruli khachapuri.

  • It's a boat-shaped bread with melted cheese,

  • traditionally feta, in the center,

  • and topped with a raw egg.

  • Widely popular in many Middle Eastern countries,

  • lavash is a thin flatbread

  • baked in a clay oven, or tonir.

  • In 2014, it was added

  • to the UNESCO list of Intangible Cultural Heritage

  • as an expression of Armenian culture.

  • Cream-cheese-filled garlic bread

  • is a popular street food in South Korea.

  • Soft buns are cut open and filled with cream cheese,

  • then dipped into a melted butter-garlic mixture

  • that includes basil, parsley, and Parmesan cheese.

  • There are many popular bagel origin stories.

  • However, according to Maria Balinska, author of

  • "The Bagel: The Surprising History of a Modest Bread,"

  • bagels were brought to Poland from Germany

  • and were originally called obwarzanek.

  • They were popularized by Queen Jadwiga of Poland

  • and later brought to countries like the US,

  • where they were praised as one of the best ways

  • to enjoy breakfast.

  • Simit has many similarities to a bagel.

  • However, instead of being boiled in water,

  • simit is dipped in sweetened water

  • and coated in sesame seeds before it's baked.

  • The result is an encrusted circular bread snack,

  • quintessential of Turkish culture and cuisine.

  • Not to be confused with English muffins,

  • crumpets are softer,

  • closer to the texture of a pancake rather than bread.

  • This is because the flour-to-liquid ratio

  • is skewed more towards liquid, creating a looser batter.

  • Once placed on a griddle,

  • the batter forms a smooth, crunchy bottom

  • and a spongy top.

  • Perfect for butter.

  • Pandebono is Colombian cheese bread.

  • Because it's made with tapioca or yucca flour and cornmeal,

  • it's gluten-free.

  • Mixed with milk, queso fresco, and eggs,

  • pandebono can be ball- or doughnut-shaped,

  • and it's best served warm.

  • Pão de queijo is delicious cheese bread

  • that will melt in your mouth.

  • Ingredients include tapioca flour, milk, eggs,

  • and queijo de Minas,

  • sometimes substituted with Parmesan cheese.

  • The Brazilian snack is soft and airy,

  • so you're likely to have more than just one.

  • Parotta is layered flatbread made from maida flour,

  • which is similar to cake flour in the US.

  • One of the most popular types of parotta in South India

  • is coin parotta.

  • The dough is stretched out as thin as possible

  • to create multiple layers,

  • gathered together, and then fried.

  • Essential ingredients in soda bread are flour,

  • buttermilk, baking soda and powder, and salt.

  • Recent twists add sugar and raisins.

  • The dense bread was actually first created

  • by Native Americans and later adopted by the Irish

  • in a time of serious financial hardship

  • throughout the country.

  • Soda bread went on to become a culinary staple in Ireland.

  • Though the recipe for challah is simple,

  • it's the braiding techniques

  • that truly separate it from other types of bread.

  • Challah is important in Jewish traditions.

  • It's typically eaten on Shabbat, or Sabbath,

  • Judaism's day of rest,

  • and other ceremonial occasions and Jewish holidays,

  • excluding Passover.

  • Conchas are one of the most popular

  • traditional sweet breads in Mexican cuisine.

  • The surface of conchas resembles a seashell,

  • making it not only easy to recognize,

  • but extremely popular in the age of social media.

  • Kare pan, or curry bread, is deep-fried dough

  • filled with Japanese curry.

  • The dough does include yeast,

  • so it's meant to rise before deep-frying.

  • Kare pan normally incorporates curried ground beef

  • and onions in the middle.

  • It's the perfect comfort food.

  • Naan is delicious, from the texture to the flavors.

  • A key ingredient to the unique texture is yogurt.

  • Naan is made in a clay oven called a tandoor.

  • The dough adheres to the sides,

  • where it's cooked rapidly at high temperatures.

  • Tiger bread gets its name from its resemblance to a tiger.

  • After the dough is made,

  • a rice flour mixture is used to coat

  • the topping of the bread before it goes into the oven.

  • The reason rice flour is used for the top

  • is because it does not contain gluten.

  • So instead of expanding with the bread, it'll crack apart,

  • creating the unique design the bread is known for.

  • Proja is cornbread.

  • The dense, cake-like bread

  • is very popular in the Balkan region

  • and shares many similarities with American cornbread,

  • popular in Native American and African American homes.

  • Proja can be garnished or filled with feta,

  • goat, or cottage cheese.

  • Standing at a whopping two or sometimes three feet,

  • sangak is a mild sourdough flatbread

  • made with sesame seeds.

  • This national bread got its name

  • from the stones and pebbles the bread is baked on.

  • Those stones also give it its unique shape.

  • Limpa, a Swedish word meaning loaf,

  • has slightly changed with each generation.

  • A popular recipe for Swedish limpa bread

  • incorporates fennel or anise seeds,

  • a sweetener, and orange zest.

  • However, a traditional recipe uses brewer's wort.

  • Croissants may be considered French,

  • but they're actually an adaptation of Austria's kipferl.

  • The first verified evidence of a croissant in France

  • was at the shop of a Viennese baker, August Zang.

  • He brought kipferl to France

  • and made it with flakier dough.

  • People began referring to them as croissants

  • because of their crescent shape.

  • And French bakers went on to imitate

  • and popularize the bread pastry.

  • Malawach is a traditional flatbread

  • with flaky layers on the inside

  • popular in Yemeni Jewish cuisine.

  • It can be served with many different toppings

  • and can be eaten throughout the day,

  • though, traditionally, it's served for breakfast,

  • topped with chopped hard-boiled eggs and tomatoes

  • and a spicy condiment called zhug.

  • Focaccia has to be one of the most beloved breads in Italy.

  • The flatbread's key ingredients are flour,

  • water, yeast, and olive oil.

  • It's enjoyed any time of the day

  • as a savory or sweet snack.

  • The taste and thickness of focaccia varies throughout Italy.

  • Most people add butter to their bread

  • after it's done baking,

  • but butter flap incorporates the butter

  • before the bread goes into the oven.

  • Each layer gets a spread of softened butter.