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  • Hi everybody, and welcome to another edition of "Which phrase is it?"!

  • A game where we test your ability to tell when to use the appropriate phrase at the

  • right time, so you can become a native speaker!

  • Of course, no native speaker would ever make a mistake with these phrases, and our job

  • is to make sure you get them correct.

  • So after we play the game, we're going to take some time to explain them to you.

  • Are you ready?

  • We're going to go to the board.

  • Now remember, as always, there are ten points for each correct answer.

  • I will first ask you which one.

  • You won't know the answers until we complete all of the phrases.

  • And at that time, we will review - sorry, review - reveal the correct phrase and we're

  • going to test and see your knowledge.

  • Get a pencil and paper, write down your answer.

  • You can't cheat because, of course, we want to know, "Which phrase is it?"

  • Let's go to the board.

  • It seems E is already playing with mirror E, and they're neck and neck.

  • What does that mean?

  • I don't know, but we'll find out.

  • Let's start off with the first.

  • Which phrase means to be a bad dancer?

  • Which phrase means to be a bad dancer?

  • Is it "Toe to toe" or is it "Two left feet"?

  • Did you write down your answer?

  • Good.

  • Now we're going on to question number two.

  • Which phrase means to agree with other?

  • Which phrase means to agree with each other?

  • Is it "Eyeball to eyeball" or "Eye to eye"?

  • Is it "Eyeball to eyeball" or "Eye to eye"?

  • Answer it now.

  • Question number three.

  • Which phrase means to meet someone in the same place, or at the same place?

  • What does it mean - which phrase means to meet someone in the same place, or at the

  • same place?

  • Is it "Head to head" or "Face to face"?

  • Which phrase is it?

  • Number four, which phrase means sarcastic?

  • Which phrase means sarcastic?

  • Is it "Tongue in cheek" or "Hand to mouth"?

  • Which one?

  • And the final one, which phrase means to be in a tie?

  • A tie?

  • A tie?

  • Don't worry about it.

  • A tie.

  • Okay, we'll have to come back to, what does he mean?

  • Is that a bow tie?

  • Is it "Neck and neck" or "Cheek to cheek"?

  • To be in a tie, is it "Neck and neck" or "Cheek to cheek"?

  • Do you have all of your answers lined up?

  • Let's see if you got them correct.

  • Which phrase means to be a bad dancer?

  • Well, it is "Two left feet".

  • If you got that correct, give yourself 10 points.

  • If you didn't get it correct, you better stick around, 'cause you've got some lessons to

  • do.

  • Next one was: Which phrase means to agree with each other?

  • Which phrase means to agree with each other?

  • Is it "Eyeball to eyeball" or "Eye to eye"?

  • Answer is "Eye to eye".

  • If you got "Eye to eye", you get 10 points.

  • Congratulations, some of you have 20 points.

  • And if you don't know which is which, you know what you have to do.

  • Number three: Which phrase means to meet someone at the same place?

  • Is it "Head to head" or "Face to face"?

  • Cheek to cheek - sorry, going crazy.

  • No music time.

  • It's "Face to face".

  • If you got "Face to face", you have now earned yourself 30 points.

  • Don't know why it's not "Head to head"?

  • Stick around.

  • Finally - not finally, sorry.

  • Almost finally: Which phrase means sarcastic?

  • Which phrase means sarcastic?

  • Is it "Tongue in cheek" or "Hand to mouth"?

  • Did you say "Tongue in cheek"?

  • Congratulations, you've just earned yourself another 40 points.

  • And the final one we have here is: Which phrase means to be in a tie?

  • What?

  • You're confused by "tie"?

  • You think it's my stylish bow tie?

  • No.

  • A tie means when two individuals, corporations, or animals at courses, "NEIGH!", are in a

  • race and they are - are they "Neck and neck" or "Cheek to cheek"?

  • If you wrote "Neck and neck", you got 10 points.

  • You earned 50 points and you, my friend, are a phrasal verb champion!

  • But do you know what all ten mean?

  • Stick around, and after this, we'll take it up on the board where we'll do definitions,

  • you'll get your bonus round, and your homework.

  • Right after this commercial break.

  • God, I'm going to get a divorce and the dog died... not enough vodka in the world to...

  • HI!!

  • Welcome back to the phrase game, that's right!

  • Ahem.

  • Tough job I have.

  • Okay.

  • And on the phrase game, we're going to go over the answers from our earlier segment,

  • after that spot from our sponsors.

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So, "Toe to toe", if you don't know, toe, foot.

  • Going toe to toe is an aggressive way to get me to - so either you're fighting or you're

  • arguing.

  • And you're standing directly in front of the person, toe to toe.

  • So your toes might be touching.

  • To have two left feet is to not be graceful.

  • That means you're not a good dancer and you're not good at sports.

  • What does that mean?

  • Well, this is my left hand, but for you at home, it probably looks on this side.

  • These work together - sorry, let me put the mic down.

  • These work together.

  • If you do this, they don't work so well.

  • So, it's very difficult to move properly.

  • So you'll be bad at sports and you will be bad at dancing.

  • So, to have two left feet means you would have two of these feet, left side, and they

  • don't work well.

  • So, you're not very graceful.

  • Eyeball to eyeball to face someone in an aggressive way.

  • So if I did this, that's aggressive.

  • Really close, our eyes touch, that's eyeball to eyeball.

  • So, we're facing someone in an aggressive way.

  • Which seems similar to "Eye to eye", but it's not.

  • When you see eye to eye, it means you agree.

  • So maybe you're both looking in the same direction going, "Yes, that's good".

  • To agree.

  • You have the same view or point of view and the same opinion.

  • Number three: head to head.

  • There seems to be a lot of violence in today's lesson.

  • Going head to head is direct competition.

  • It can mean conflict, which is fighting, but head to head competition - if you said Apple,

  • and let's say Apple and Microsoft are in head to head competition.

  • They were competing with each other directly.

  • It doesn't necessarily mean fighting, but they are competing.

  • Face to face, well, in the modern age, we're very lucky.

  • Many of us go on our cell phones and talk, but we actually never meet the person on the

  • other side of the cell phone.

  • When you go face to face, you put away the cell phone, you're not on the radio or the

  • telephone.

  • You go to meet them, open the door and say, "Hi, I'm James.

  • And we're now meeting face to face."

  • Tongue in cheek.

  • Tongue - it means to not be serious about what you're saying.

  • So, if you said to somebody, "You'd look good dressed up as a red tomato", I'm not serious.

  • I'm being sarcastic.

  • It doesn't mean I'm lying.

  • So, someone says to you, "He said it tongue in cheek", they're saying don't worry, he

  • was just joking.

  • He wasn't, or she wasn't being serious.

  • Now, to say "hand to mouth", this is kind of a sad one.

  • Many people in the world today live hand to mouth.

  • And what that means is they only have enough for their immediate needs.

  • What does that mean?

  • It means they don't have enough money to put in the bank to save or to buy a house or even

  • buy good food.

  • They just have enough money to do what they have to do in that moment, and no extra.

  • And it's not just an African or a South American problem.

  • It's a worldwide problem.

  • A lot of people live in poverty and don't have money and they live hand to mouth.

  • Neck and neck and cheek to cheek, toe to toe - okay.

  • Neck and neck.

  • Well, you could see - we don't have it here, but E was neck and neck.

  • This is an interesting one for all of you soccer fans, you'll know this one.

  • Where this is a tie - and when I say tie, the score is 1 - 1, or 0 - 0, 2 - 2 is a tie.

  • But it also could be neck and neck.

  • There is a difference.

  • When there is a tie, the numbers are the same.

  • If you have two points and I have two points, we're at a tie.

  • When we're competing or playing a game with each other, we could be neck and neck, which

  • means very close.

  • So, if you're watching a soccer game with your friend and you go to the washroom and

  • come back and go, "Hey, how's Arsenal doing?"

  • And he goes, "Manchester and Arsenal are neck and neck."

  • It doesn't mean they have the score, but they're in the same place, okay?

  • They could have the same score, but they're almost equal.

  • So, you could say, "Manchester United and Arsenal are neck and neck on the score", like

  • the games, which means they're almost the same, 20 - 21.

  • Not a tie.

  • Got it?

  • Alright.

  • So now, you've learned "tie".

  • You can sound really smart, right?

  • Like a native speaker.

  • Alright.

  • So, and the last one is cheek to cheek.

  • Cheek, and we usually use it for sitting or dancing.

  • It's a phrase that usually goes "They were sitting cheek to cheek" or dancing cheek to

  • cheek, which means this cheek is on someone else's cheek and they were dancing very closely.

  • So, if you're dancing cheek to cheek, you're very close.

  • If you're sitting cheek to cheek because, believe it or not, your bum has cheeks.

  • And if you're sitting real close, you're sitting cheek to cheek, bums are touching.

  • Yes!

  • We are having l'amour.

  • Anyway.

  • I hope you got - if you didn't get ten - sorry.

  • I actually thought that was funny, which is bad.

  • But if you didn't get 5/5 before, I'm hoping by going over it now, looking at the quiz

  • I gave at the beginning for the quiz game, looking at the explanations, you will understand

  • which is which.

  • Which is nice.

  • You use your curiosity to come back to the second half to learn.

  • Because of that, you deserve a bonus, alright?

  • So, I'm going to give you three bonuses.

  • They have some similarities, in which I used foot, head, and neck that we used before,

  • but I'm going to show you something very different.

  • Because in the first five, there was a lot of competition.

  • So, we're using body parts, describe a lot of competition, yeah?

  • In this, I'm going to show you something completely different using the same three words.

  • Now, when you put your foot down, it means to refuse or tell someone you're not going

  • to let this happen.

  • If you had - okay, some of you guys are kids, and some of you guys are parents, so you'll

  • understand.

  • If you're a parent and your child comes home late every night, you might say, "I'm putting

  • my foot down!

  • You have to be home at 7:00 all the time!"

  • Which means I'm not going to allow you to come home late anymore.

  • It's my house, you're going to listen.

  • If your boss at work says, "I'm putting my foot down, Jones!

  • You've been late four times this week.

  • One more time, you're fired!"

  • It means you're not allowed to be late anymore, or you'll be fired.

  • When someone says they're putting their foot down, they're saying to you, "I will not let

  • this behavior or this action happen again."

  • There will be consequences.

  • Don't let me put my foot up your - that's a different thing.

  • That's another video.

  • Put our heads together.

  • Now, imagine - here's me and here's E. And Mr. E and put our heads together.

  • It's so cute, right?

  • No.

  • When you put your heads together, it's like you double the brainpower.

  • So, when you have a problem and you say to somebody, "We need to put our heads together

  • on this", it means we need to come together, work together to solve a problem.

  • So, in a marriage, if the husband and wife are not happy, they need to put their heads

  • together to come up with a solution so they both can be happy.

  • Right?

  • Or in business, if you have a problem, "Jones!

  • I don't know how this new product is going to go.

  • We need to get the team, get their heads together, and figure out a solution."

  • Work together, okay?

  • So, work together would be simple.

  • Now, put your neck on the line.

  • When you put your neck on the line, it means your put yourself in a dangerous situation

  • where people might change their opinion about you, or you could get in serious trouble.

  • If you have a friend, say Mr. E. I have a job and Mr. E wants to work with me.

  • I know Mr. E isn't a great worker, but I tell my boss, "Boss, E is the best worker around."