Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello, everyone. My name is Fiona

  • Today we're going to be looking at two words

  • These two words. They look the same and they almost sound the same

  • but they're different. Keep watching to find out what the  

  • difference is and to help improve your English  pronunciation and English listening skills

  • Let's get started. First I'll say the sentence quickly

  • Really listen. 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it.' 

  • Now again, but slower. 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it.' 

  • Okay let's see the sentence. 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it.' 

  • What words go in these two gaps? Any ideas

  • Well the answer is - 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it.' 

  • You can see that they look the same, but they mean different things

  • Now, let's have a look at our two words

  • We have 'close' and 'close'. They are spelled in the same way

  • but they have different meanings  and different pronunciation

  • It's what we call a heteronym. Now what's a heteronym

  • Two words. Same spelling

  • Different meaning. Different pronunciation

  • Okay let's start with the meaning  and pronunciation of our first word

  • 'close' 'close' is an adjective

  • It means that something is near to me. I have two sentences to help show this

  • The first one, 'You're standing too close to me.' 

  • The person is too near. They're taking up my room - my space

  • It's a physical distance. You're too close to me

  • The second sentence isn't a physical distance, but an emotional one

  • 'My mother and I are very close.' My mother isn't here right now

  • We're not physically closewe're emotionally close

  • We have a very good relationship. Okay let's practice pronunciation

  • The word is 'close'. Repeat after me

  • 'close' 'close

  • Now let's look at the meaning and  pronunciation of our second word

  • 'close

  • 'close' is a verb. An action word

  • It means to shut. The opposite is to open

  • I have two sentences to show you this. First one

  • 'Please close the window. I'm cold.' I'm asking you to shut the window

  • Sentence number two - 'I close my eyes before I sleep.' 

  • 'I close my eyes before I sleep.' 

  • Now let's have a look at pronunciation. Repeat after me

  • 'close' 'close

  • Now let's have a look at our main sentence. 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it.' 

  • We've looked at 'close' and 'close', but let's not forget 'I'm' and 'I'll'. 

  • I am close - I'm near to the door  

  • so I'll close it. I'll shut it

  • I will do it. Okay let's practice

  • I'm gonna say it slowly to  start and then we'll speed up

  • 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it' 'I'm close to the door so I'll close it

  • Well done. Great job guys

  • You got some awesome English listening and  English pronunciation practice in today

  • If you want to leave a comment to let  me know what you thought of this video

  • leave them down below. And, as always, I'm really really  

  • thankful for my students support. I'll see you in the next video

  • Hello, everyone. My name is Fiona. Today, we're going to be looking at two words 

  • that will really help your English  pronunciation and listening skills

  • They look the same and they almost sound the same

  • but what's the difference? Keep watching to find out why

  • Let's get started. Okay, this one is tricky,  

  • so I really want you to listen hard. okay? I'm going to say the sentence first quickly

  • Are you ready? 'We produce produce at the farm.' 

  • Oooh, that one's tough. I know, I know. So I'm gonna say it again but slower. second time

  • Are you ready? 'We produce produce at the farm.' 

  • Now I'll show you. Here's the sentence

  • 'We produce produce at the farm.' What words go in these two gaps? any ideas

  • Well, the answer is 'We  produce produce at the farm.' 

  • They look exactly the same. I know, I know. But the pronunciation here is really important

  • it changes the meaning and  gives you two different words

  • So let's find out why. Now let's have a look at our two words

  • We have 'produce' and 'produce'. They spelled the same

  • but the meaning and the  pronunciation is different

  • It's a 'heteronym'. What is a 'heteronym'? 

  • It's where the two words are spelled the same way But the meaning and the  

  • pronunciation is different. Let's start with the meaning and  

  • pronunciation of our first word. 'Produce'. 

  • 'Produce' is a verb. it means to make something. And I have two sentences to show you

  • 'France produces a lot of wine.' And 'Cities produce a lot of trash.' 

  • They make a lot of rubbish. Now Let's practice pronunciation

  • 'Produce' 'Produce

  • Okay, time for what number 2. 'Produce'. 

  • 'Produce' is a noun. it  means fruits and vegetables

  • So you might have the produce section at a market. Again, I have two sentences to show you this

  • 'I work at the produce section in the market.' 'I work at the produce section in the market.' 

  • And our second sentence

  • 'They have fresh produce every day.' 'They have fresh produce every day.' 

  • Ok, let's practice pronunciation. Are you ready? Repeat after me

  • 'Produce' 'Produce

  • Let's go back to our main sentence. 'We produce produce at the farm.' 

  • We 'produce', we make we grow, 'produce', fresh fruits and  

  • vegetables, at the farm. Ok, let's practice together

  • First, we'll go slow. 'We produce produce at the farm.' 

  • Now faster like a native speaker. 'We produce produce at the farm.' 

  • Well done. Great job today, guys. you did really well

  • And we got some awesome listening and pronunciation practicing

  • Leave a comment down below I read all of them And I'm always thankful for my students support

  • I'll see you in the next video.

  • Hello, everyone. My name is Fiona

  • Today we're going to be looking at two words that will really help your English pronunciation 

  • and listening skills. They look the same

  • and they almost sound the same

  • But what's the difference? Keep watching to find out what it is

  • Let's begin. Are you ready

  • I want you to really listen hard, because 

  • this one's tricky. First, I'll say the sentence quickly

  • 'Let's present the present to him.' Hmm.. 

  • Okay, second time, but slower. Really listen

  • 'Let's present the present to him.' Okay, I'll show you

  • 'Let's present the present to him.' What words go in these two blanks

  • Well, the answer is 'Let's present the present 

  • to him.' Oh No! They look like the same word

  • Again, It's pronunciation  that's really important here

  • It changes the meaning. Let me explain in more detail

  • Let's take a closer look at our two words. We have 'present' and 'present'. 

  • They're spelt the same way, but the pronunciation and  

  • the meaning is different. It's what we call a 'Heteronym'. 

  • What is a 'Heteronym'? It's where two words are spelled the same way

  • but the meaning and the  pronunciation is different

  • Let's look at the meaning and pronunciation of our first word

  • 'present' 'present' is a verb

  • It means to give or reward  formally or in a ceremony

  • And I have two sentences to show you. The first one

  • 'I like to present awards to my students.' I like to give my students awards

  • The second sentence, 'A celebrity will present the prizes.' 

  • A celebrity will give you your prize. Now repeat after me

  • 'present' 'present

  • Now let's have a look at our second word, 'present'. 

  • 'present' is a noun. It means a gift something that you give to 

  • someone. And I have two sentences to show you this

  • 'Thank you for the wonderful present.' Thank you for this wonderful gift that you 

  • have given me. Number two

  • 'I didn't get a present for my birthday.' I didn't get a gift for my birthday

  • No one gave me anything. Okay, let's have a look at pronunciation

  • 'present'. 'present'. 

  • Okay, let's look at our main sentence one more time

  • 'Let's present the present to him.' Let's 'present', let's give

  • the 'present', the gift, to him. Okay, repeat after me

  • We'll go slowly first, and  then like a native speaker

  • 'Let's present the present to him.' 

  • And faster now. 'Let's present the present to him.' 

  • Well done. Great job, guys

  • You got some awesome listening and pronunciation practicing today

  • If you want to leave a comment to let me know what you thought of this video,  

  • leave them down below. And as always, I'm really, really thankful 

  • for my student support. I'll see you in the next video

  • Hello, everyone. My name is Fiona

  • Today we're going to be  looking at these two words

  • They're really going to help your English  pronunciation and listening skills

  • They look the same, but what's the difference? Keep watching and find out why

  • Are you ready? Let's begin

  • First, I'm going to say the sentence quickly. So listen really hard

  • 'The nurse wound the bandage around the wound.' 

  • Woo, I told you it was tricky. Let me say it again, but slower

  • Are you ready? 'The nurse wound the bandage around the wound.' 

  • Okay, here's the sentence. 'The nurse wound the bandage around the wound.' 

  • What words go in these two blanks

  • Well, the answer is, 'The nurse  wound the bandage around the wound.' 

  • They look the same, but they sound different. I know, I know.  

  • Let me explain why the two different words. Okay, let's take a look at these two words

  • 'wound' and 'wound'. They spell the same way, but the  

  • pronunciation and the meaning is different. It's a Heteronym

  • What's the Heteronym? It's where two words are spelled the same way

  • but have a different pronunciationand a different meaning

  • Let's have a look at the meaning  and pronunciation of our two words

  • First, we have 'wound'. 'wound' is a verb,  

  • it's past tense of the verb 'wind'. And 'wind' means to turn or coil lots of times

  • I have two sentences to show you this. 'Yesterday,'. past tense, already happened

  • 'I wound my watch.' 'Yesterday, I wound my watch.' 

  • And sentence number two. 'The vine wound around the pole.' 

  • The vine, a plant, wound around the pole. Okay, pronunciation

  • Repeat after me. 'wound

  • 'wound