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  • Recently, president trump mispronounced Yosemite.

  • When they gaze upon Yosemite's— Yosemite's towering sequoias

  • Now, yes, probably 99 percent of Americans, if not more, know how to pronounce Yosemite.

  • It's one of America's most famous national parks.

  • But still, I would feel very confident saying every person who speaks American English has mispronounced a word.

  • I've done it.

  • You've done it.

  • In this video, we're going to look at tricky words that mess Americans up.

  • Why? Two reasons.

  • My students are people who are not native speakers of American English,

  • some of them are terrified, mortified of saying a word incorrectly, of misusing it.

  • So I'm making this video so that one, they know native speakers do this too.

  • If we read a word or learn it through reading, we may mispronounce it.

  • There's not a direct correlation between letters and sounds in American English.

  • For example, grove, glove. Oh, ah.

  • Why are the vowel sounds different?

  • And the second reason I'm making this is so that students can learn some of these tricky words

  • that might be intimidating.

  • Now as always, if you like this video, or you learned something new,

  • please like and subscribe with notifications. It really helps.

  • Let's start by looking at the word Yosemite.

  • A word that ends in M-I-T-E, will usually be pronounced: mite.

  • Termite. Stalagmite.

  • But not this word, this word is Yosemite.

  • It comes from the language of the indigenous people who populated the area that is now this national park.

  • Yosemite.

  • Not:

  • Yosemites, yosemites.

  • But: Yosemite.

  • Second syllable stress, flap T, Yosemite, mite, mite. Yosemite.

  • Now just to be fair to both sides of the political spectrum here,

  • I found a word that president Obama mispronounced.

  • I'm going to stress again, every native speaker of American English has mispronounced a word.

  • If you're a native speaker, and you're watching this video, please put in the comments

  • words that you have mispronounced, why you did it, how you figured it out, who corrected you,

  • if you can remember all of that.

  • Okay here's Obama:

  • Representative of the extraordinary work that our men and women in uniform do,

  • all around the world.

  • Navy corpsman, Christian Bashar.

  • The word is corpsman but he pronounced all of the letters making it corpsman.

  • Just as trump was, he was reading off a teleprompter,

  • and you know, now that I think of it, that might have been the reason these words were mispronounced.

  • You're in front of a crowd, reading something you probably didn't write,

  • it's less organic than saying a word that comes to mind.

  • It's not corpsman, it's corpsman.

  • The word corps is a word I've definitely heard mispronounced.

  • By the way, I tried to see if Obama mispronounced the word corps and I couldn't find any examples.

  • He always said it right.

  • But if you've only learned the word by reading it and you've never heard it pronounced,

  • how would you know the P and the S are silent?

  • This word comes to English, from French, from the Latin word 'corpus' meaning body.

  • And in French, they drop a lot of sounds so we picked that up when we absorbed the word from them.

  • You might have heard the terms peace corps, Marine Corps, press corps.

  • A corps is a group of people associated with each other,

  • acting together, especially, for example, in the military.

  • Now to make it more confusing, the word corporal,

  • which also comes from French, and originally the Latin word corpus,

  • does have a P sound. Corporal. Corporal.

  • But corps, silent P, silent S.

  • On top of this, if you pronounced all the letters and you did say the word 'corpse' that is a word,

  • only we spell it with an E at the end.

  • It's a dead body.

  • Very different meaning.

  • Corps.

  • Corpse.

  • Okay, now we're going to go to a news correspondent, Kris Jansing.

  • I asked her if there are any words she has a hard time pronouncing.

  • Are there any words in American English that you stumble over sometimes, that are a challenge for you?

  • Do you know, I think it's like anybody else, sometimes when you read something, it just doesn't look right.

  • And it might be a simple word, so usually, it's something like that that will trip you up.

  • She agrees the teleprompter might be causing some of the mispronunciations,

  • because some words just don't look at all like they're pronounced.

  • She gives us another word I hear mispronounced a lot,

  • and you all pointed out too in the comments of another video on mispronunciations.

  • I do have some pet peeves, like nuclear,

  • which we know is nuclear,

  • kind of bug me a little bit.

  • Listening to the pronunciation, I hope, guys.

  • Yes.

  • Nuclear.

  • This is a three-syllable word with stress on the first syllable.

  • DA-da-da.

  • Sometimes, even native speakers will mix up the location of the L and say: nuc-ya-lar.

  • But it's: nu-cle-ar, nu-cle-ar.

  • Nuclear.

  • But we all do the best we can and you never get it right 100 percent of the time.

  • Nuclear.

  • Nuclear. Not nu-cu-ler. Nuclear.

  • By the way, did you hear Kris Jansing use the term 'pet peeve'?

  • This is a term we use for something that annoys us.

  • For example, one of my pet peeves is when people chew with their mouths open while eating.

  • Pet peeve.

  • Actually, someone else used that phrase in the comments.

  • My pet peeve is people mispronouncing realtor like really re-lit-or.

  • Realtor. This is a word that we use for people that help us buy and sell houses.

  • Real estate agents.

  • There's no sound between L and T.

  • Real-ter.

  • But lots of people put a schwa between L and T,

  • and make the T a flap T, which sounds like: re-lit-or, re-lit-or.

  • It's small, adding that extra syllable.

  • It's like when people say 'triathalon' when it's actually triath-lon.

  • No vowel between the constants TH and L in triathlon,

  • and no vowel between L and T in realtor.

  • Real estate realtor.

  • You know, English words that come from French can be especially tricky to pronounce.

  • One person commented about cash, and cachet.

  • Robin says: as an avid reader, I've mispronounced lots of words over the years.

  • And then goes on to talk about cache versus cachet.

  • Do you know the word avid? It's a great vocabulary word.

  • It means a lot of interest in something, an eagerness for something, a desire for something.

  • As an avid reader, Robin loves to read.

  • More sample sentences: avid fans can meet her after the performance.

  • Or, he's an avid supporter of the arts.

  • Someone else brought up cache and cachet and said:

  • One of my co-workers 'cracks me up' now that's a phrasal verb that means 'makes me laugh really hard',

  • one of my co-workers cracks me up whenever she says her computer is going slowly,

  • and she has to clear her cache.

  • So cache, cachet.

  • We have two different words here. Cache, which doesn't have a T and cachet which

  • does have a T but we don't pronounce it.

  • Most Americans if they didn't know this word when they saw it written would probably pronounce it cachet.

  • But it's from French, the CH is an SH sound, we have stress on the last syllable and we don't say the T.

  • Cachet.

  • Actually, the stress can be on either syllable, but second syllable is more common.

  • Cachet is being respected, admired, it's prestige.

  • If you have social cachet, you're popular, important, and well liked.

  • Cache, on the other hand, is pronounced just like this word 'cash' as in money.

  • It's a place of storage, maybe hidden.

  • You're probably familiar with this when it comes to computers.

  • It's temporary storage for a web browser to make pages load faster for you in the future.

  • Cachet.

  • Cache.

  • Two totally different words, and yes, sometimes Americans say cachet when they mean cache.

  • Which makes sense because in cache, we don't say anything for that ending letter E. But in cliché, we do.

  • This is another word that you might hear mispronounced:

  • clich, clikee, clitchy? No. Cliché.

  • Again, second syllable stress and the CH makes an SH sound.

  • Cliché. Something is a cliché if it's a stereotype, unoriginal, overused.

  • I'll use it in a sentence:

  • The novel is cliché. There are no interesting characters, the plot lines are very predictable.

  • So why in cache, is CHE pronounced SH

  • whereas in cliché, it's pronounced 'shay'?

  • I have no idea.

  • But remember, cache, storage.

  • Cachet, prestige.

  • Cliché, unoriginal.

  • Our last two words are also of French origin.

  • Do you know how to pronounce this word?

  • Are you thinking debris?

  • That's probably how an American would pronounce it if they'd never seen it before or heard it,

  • but it's: debris.

  • Last syllable stress, silent S.

  • Debris is leftover, bits and pieces, remains of something. For example:

  • After the earthquake, we went searching through the debris of buildings.

  • And let's do one more: debt.

  • That's something owed, we have a lot of credit card debt, for example. That means we owe a lot of money to the credit card company.

  • Debt, no B sound. Same with doubt, no B sound, silent B.

  • We're getting towards the end of this video. Now, if you're still watching, thank you.

  • If you ever notice a video where someone is mispronouncing a word, like Trump or Obama

  • in the examples, in this video, please come back to this video here and link that mistake in the comments,

  • I absolutely love that kind of thing.

  • And don't stop, keep watching.

  • We've got almost 700 great videos on the English language for you.

  • I make new videos primarily to help non-native speakers of American English

  • feel more confident and comfortable speaking English, every Tuesday morning.

  • I also have an academy, Rachel's English Academy

  • where you can train to take your English communication skills to a new level,

  • check it out at rachelsenglishacademy.com

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

Recently, president trump mispronounced Yosemite.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B2 cache mispronounced yosemite cliché syllable pronounced

10 Words Americans Say WRONG! | Americans Mispronounce These Words Often

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    Summer posted on 2020/10/08
Video vocabulary