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  • - I have patient who know they have a skin cancer

  • and they're like well, I treated it with apple cider vinegar

  • for two months and it didn't go away.

  • I'm like really? (chuckles)

  • Okay. (upbeat percussion music)

  • Hi, I'm Dr. Ellen Marmur.

  • I'm a Board Certified Dermatologist in New York City.

  • I have two practices called Marmur medical

  • and a skincare line called MM Skincare.

  • I'm here today to do a deep dive in the go to bed with me

  • comments section about sunscreen, eye creams, and cleansers.

  • First things first, let's dive into sunscreen.

  • (upbeat percussion music)

  • Catherine Coon, "Why do dermatologists

  • "talk about using sunscreen all the time?

  • "If I'm only going to be outside for a total of 30 minutes

  • "spread throughout the day,

  • "isn't that just a good healthy way

  • "of getting your vitamin D?

  • "I definitely don't burn unless I'm outside

  • "for more than 30 minutes at a given time."

  • The myth is that sunscreen blocks vitamin D.

  • So really you need to know

  • that you're gonna get your vitamin D through your diet,

  • so eat a great diet,

  • you're gonna get vitamin D through your sunscreen

  • so you can still wear your sunscreens.

  • It's not really a reason to not wear sunscreen

  • and think about sunscreen math.

  • When you wear sunscreen 20 plus sunscreen 30

  • you're still just getting a better sunscreen 20.

  • So there's no reason to not just have it in your makeup

  • or in your moisturizer every day

  • and just get that added benefit.

  • But talk about skin cancer math.

  • Skin cancer happens from an accumulation of sun exposure

  • so even if you're out for five minutes here,

  • five minutes there, five minutes there

  • you're getting an addition of that sun damage

  • throughout the day.

  • So use your sun protection.

  • I tell my patients it's like money in the bank

  • for good health and better skin

  • so there's no reason not to put on your sunscreen.

  • So what is SPF?

  • SPF is sun protection factor and really what it means

  • is how long can you stay out in the sun

  • without getting a sunburn and usually what is means

  • is that it's protecting you against UVB

  • which is a portion of the type of UV you get.

  • So you get ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B.

  • A is usually the tanning rays,

  • B is usually the burning rays.

  • Now that we have broad spectrum sunscreen

  • you're getting sun protection

  • throughout the UVA and UVB segment

  • but SPF still stands only for UVB protection

  • and it means how many times longer

  • can you stay out in the sun before getting red.

  • So an SPF 15 would mean

  • that you can stay out for 15 times longer in the sun.

  • So for example if I were to go out in the sun

  • and get sun burnt in a minute and I put on SPF 15

  • it would give me 15 minutes before I turned red.

  • If you're the kind of person who would go out in the sun

  • and you live in the tropics where the sun is really hot

  • and it would take you only let's say an hour

  • to get a sunburn and you put SPF 15 on

  • then you could stay out for 15 hours theoretically.

  • However, the problem is none of us put on SPF

  • as thick as it is tested in the FDA labs.

  • So most of us rub it off.

  • We think we're rubbing it in

  • but we're really just schmearing it thinner and thinner

  • so you're really never getting the number

  • that you have on you label.

  • So maybe an SPF 50 or an SPF 60

  • is then giving you an SPF 30.

  • So always opt up on the number of SPF.

  • I feel like a 15 doesn't even count.

  • So really it should be between SPF 30 and 60

  • for your sweet spot.

  • KW Jeong said, "How should I put my SPF and with what?"

  • I think that means how should I put on my SPF and with what?

  • It depends, so there's so many different kinds of FDA

  • sort of approved types of applications.

  • So gels, the balms, the creams, the sprays.

  • Those are all allowable by the FDA to claim an SPF,

  • meaning the FDA says those all work.

  • The old fashioned ways are lotions

  • and you should just schmear it on and you should put it on

  • about 15 minutes before you go out in the sun.

  • I think there's a little bit of a mythology in that

  • like putting it on for 15 minutes

  • allows it to come to like your body temperature

  • and therefore it's active and it works better.

  • I feel like if you just put it on enough and sufficiently

  • you can run right out the door and be protected

  • but put it on thoroughly, put it on with sunglasses, a hat,

  • UV protective clothing is a lifesaver

  • because then you're not using so much sunscreen on your body

  • and then reapply it every 30 to 60 minutes

  • when you're truly out in the sun being athletic

  • or being at the beach which I know you would never do

  • between 10 am and 2:00 PM

  • but you really wanna keep yourself covered and reapply.

  • "Quick question regarding sun cream.

  • "Would an SPF in foundation suffice

  • "or best to have sun cream underneath generally?"

  • So that means do you put on a moisturizer

  • and then sunscreen?

  • Do you put on sunscreen and then a moisturizer

  • or do you put on sunscreen, moisturizer, and then makeup?

  • It gets very confusing.

  • So here's where you wanna simplify your life

  • and just get something that has everything in it.

  • So a tinted SPF 30 is a great moisturizer, sun protection,

  • and makeup base that you can just put on

  • and go out the door.

  • Lilianna B, "Does sunscreen worsen your acne,

  • "cause breakouts, or make acne scars?"

  • And then Jenna says, "Lilianna B chiming in here.

  • "Chemical sunscreens cause a chemical reaction

  • "on the surface of your skin,

  • "so it can be irritating for a lot of people.

  • "Try a zinc or a TD formula."

  • That means titanium dioxide.

  • "They'll be a little whiter at first

  • "but are much gently for skin.

  • "Just be sure to use a serious cleanser

  • "at the end of the day."

  • Okay, all of it's great questions.

  • Acne can definitely get worse with certain sunscreens.

  • Part of it is because some sunscreens

  • that are water resistant are a little bit tacky

  • and they actually kind of occlude or block the skin

  • and that can make your skin break out a little bit,

  • especially like she said, like Jenna said

  • if they have a lot of chemicals in them.

  • There are sunscreens that are just for acne.

  • For example EltaMD Clear has lactic acid in it

  • and the lactic acid exfoliates the skin a little bit

  • and prevents blockage of the skin for your acne

  • and is tinted so it protects your skin.

  • And then when you wash it off at the end of the day,

  • because it's mineral based,

  • it's actually not that hard to get off

  • so you don't need to use any harsh cleansers.

  • So do pick something for acne skin

  • when you're picking your sunscreen.

  • Okay so Apurva Tik.

  • "Can I use sunscreen under eyes "and on eyelids?"

  • Great question, yes you can use sunscreen on your eyelids

  • and around your whole eyelids.

  • I see a lot of skin cancers on the eyelids.

  • I think the best and easiest way

  • is to wear a really big sunglasses

  • as much as you possibly can starting at a very early age.

  • So if you're a mother and you have kids

  • buy them sunscreen, or sunglasses actually that are bigger

  • and cover sort of the outer part of the eye.

  • How much of your body do you need to apply sunscreen to

  • when you go out?

  • And the answer is everywhere that's exposed

  • or that might be exposed as soon as you take off

  • whatever you're planning on taking off.

  • The difference between mineral sun protection

  • and chemical sun protection ingredients

  • are easy to understand.

  • Chemical ingredients absorb the energy from the UV light

  • and that's called photons.

  • So if you imagine like a ping-pong of energy

  • coming from the sky, hitting your skin,