Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • I want you to imagine you just opened your very own restaurant on you.

  • Put everything into it time, money, blood, sweat and tears on.

  • Then, a few weeks after the grand opening of your beloved restaurant, you start to receive reviews online like this.

  • Terrible.

  • The clerk is sticky.

  • I don't want to even have one star.

  • It is not worth the star, or you can drink last without salads.

  • Salads of scraps of shack.

  • I went there a 10:30 p.m. But when I tried to replace Rice, it was said there was no more grass on the 10th day of every month week in a coffee ramen with on the 10th day of every month week in a toppy ramen with 500 yen or pig bone.

  • Day store here is dirty, and my parents don't love it.

  • Should I clean the store of It's a proper store.

  • There is no meal.

  • It all it really is a scam level store.

  • Impressive chemical Rahman, with a great chemical seasoning.

  • All of the Potter is delicious with delicate taste and cannot be said of the delicious category.

  • Sound in the store is too high, even earplugs back come in.

  • When I parked to the next parking, I was told by an old lady here, and I didn't know what I was saying, but I was angry.

  • Very unpleasant.

  • Uh, yeah, I think I'll think I'll close my imaginary restaurant now.

  • These eyebrow raising remarks aren't the ramblings of the insane.

  • They are.

  • In fact, Japanese reviews have been auto translated by Google into English, with often confusing an alarming results.

  • Clearly, something has gone horribly wrong during the translation phase off the review, which is hardly surprised, given translate between Japanese language can be notoriously difficult was any new learner of Japanese will tell you.

  • Admittedly, my first year of living in Japan, I relied on Google translate a lot more than I care to admit they're seeing discovered.

  • While it's fairly reliable for individual words or simple sentences, the longer the sentences get, the quicker they fall apart on the more you sound like a deranged madman said today in this video, I thought we could go through some of these reviews and uncover where it went wrong and why translating Japanese sentences into English leads to the specter of puppy Rahman and sticky clerks, a sentence.

  • I never hope to say out loud again.

  • We'll also hear the most common mistake that new learners of Japanese make on, because I wanted to include the insights of a native Japanese speaker.

  • For better or worse, we'll be hearing from my good friend Reato, who's fluent in Japanese and English, having lived overseas in an extensive list of exotic lands, including America, the U.

  • K, Germany, Australia and none disclaimer.

  • It's important point out that some translations are beyond all hope.

  • Like this shirt I bought down the 100 yen store today, which says, in big English words, your comrades is glad your comrades is glad who my comrades while they so glad, powerful philosophical questions for another time.

  • But I like to imagine that is the exact kind of phrase there a Russian general would say to their troops to get him fired up to get the motor.

  • I'm starting to wonder if the 100 yen store just makes these weird English shirts just because they know there's a British weirdo that will come in and literally by anything about what English you print on it.

  • Clearly, the strategy's working right.

  • Then let's dive into some Google translate reviews.

  • It was a pity that we quit smoking.

  • I managed to fill my stomach when I parked to the next parking lot.

  • I was told by an old lady here, and I didn't know what I was saying, but I was angry, very unpleasant.

  • Yeah, I think my brain just crashed.

  • As he looked through these reviews, though, it quickly becomes clear that they're all failing for the same reason.

  • And it's actually the same thing that trips up learners of Japanese early on in everyday Japanese.

  • You don't need to explicitly state the subject.

  • So, for example, if I want to say I went to Tokyo, I would say, Talk your Niki much that literally Tokyo towards went notice how that phrase.

  • I didn't say the word, either.

  • I didn't refer to myself because you don't need to in Japanese.

  • Now you could do.

  • You could say what you are talking on the economic stuff, but it's not needed because it's pretty obvious who's going to take you here.

  • I'm the one speaking on the only one in the room.

  • You can kind of understand it from the context, right, but this is one of the hardest things to wrap your head around when you first start learning Japanese that you don't need to say, I you he she they.

  • And this is where Google translate is tripped up on all three of these examples.

  • So for the first one, it was a pity that we quit smoking.

  • I managed to fill my stomach, but the original Japanese sentence actually says, What a shame it became non smoking.

  • Somehow I filled myself up a k a.

  • The restaurant in question became non smoking, but nevertheless, our beloved reviewer was able to fill their stomach and stuff themselves with food.

  • But not before awarding only one star.

  • Let's face it, any restaurant that banned smoking should at least received one more bonus start.

  • Now, the sentence literally says, became non smoking.

  • What a shame, somehow stomach filled up.

  • So there's no clear subject.

  • Google Translate had to take a guess at a fill in the gaps, and in this case, rather than choose the restaurant because it didn't have the context of where the review was left, it just guessed that it was the reviewer or, in this case, way same goes for the next one.

  • When I parked in the next parking lot.

  • I was told by an old lady here, and I didn't know what I was saying, but I was angry, very unpleasant.

  • I'll get a headache just reading that on a slate.

  • But the original sentence says, I parked in the car park next to the restaurant, and the elderly looking woman said something that I didn't understand.

  • But she had an angry expression.

  • It was unpleasant.

  • In all honesty, it sounds less like a review, more like the start of a low budget horror.

  • Why was she angry?

  • What was going down in that car?

  • Park will never find out.

  • We'll never know.

  • But in the Japanese sentence, the reviewer doesn't say I once they don't say what as you are or Baku are three only subject, she explicitly states, is the old woman from here from the cafe and given it's a long sentence, requiring a lot of guesswork.

  • Google has unsurprisingly, struggled to keep up, though, to be fair, it did guest three out of five of the pronounce correctly.

  • So that's the first reason and arguably the main reason why these auto translations go so spectacularly wrong.

  • Speaking Japanese relies weigh more heavily on context.

  • One key tip to new learners of Japanese is to avoid using pronounce all together You, he or she another career Commodore.

  • They all kind of sound root on impersonal.

  • And I wouldn't recommend using them for more.

  • On this important point, there will hand you over to result to write When I hear someone for ing saying Donatella what Joshua, You I then I was a mature in English.

  • You always have to say I do this or you do you or way to say that it's quite obviously who you're talking to because the But if the person is in front of you is quite quite clear that you're talking to that person you can so you can drop you or you can drop.

  • I so be like Do you speak English?

  • A wish somebody must got.

  • But if you're a first time learning off Japanese are you tend to say Donatella able shabbily busco, then like so I could easily see that person is just learning Japanese because he doesn't drop.

  • He didn't dropped up the subject.

  • So what if the tip is that you always drop the subject?

  • If I told you to clear that career talking to and also do not use pronounce, such as Kerala, where he she don't use that we always use the name like Chris La Dota Roa Just use the name and does it.

  • I got a lot of belly.

  • Terrible.

  • The clerk is sticky on the 10th day of every month.

  • Weakening puppy Rahman Oh, on utter train wreck.

  • But why?

  • I got a lot of belly.

  • I can't exactly help it given I can't go outside of my bloody hot.

  • Actually, it says or not clear pyrotechnical monster, which means I had a good meal but literally interpreted.

  • It does, say, a full stomach I received.

  • The Japanese language is right with metaphors, particularly your stomach.

  • When it comes to hunger.

  • For example, if you're hungry, you'd say, Well, knock a sweet, better literally stomach empty.

  • And if you're full after a nice big meal of puppy Rahman, you would say, will not get pie.

  • Stomach is filled and it seems giggle tripped up on that metaphor, even if is an everyday Japanese phrase, which takes us to the second point.

  • While these translations go wrong.

  • The vocabulary, the words themselves, maybe It's a word that doesn't exist in English or a metaphor for concept that can literally be translated.

  • Example.

  • Terrible.

  • The clerk is sticky.

  • I don't want to even have one star.

  • To be fair, who could honestly say that award any stars to a restaurant if they encountered of sticky clerk?

  • The good news is judging by the original review that they might not have been so sticky after all.

  • Terrible, it says the staff try to look cool.

  • I don't want to give them a single star.

  • The reason this went wrong is the verb doesn't really exist in with the verb is China's treaty, which means to make oneself look cope, which doesn't really exist in English without a single word that that could explain that concept.

  • How do we get from that to sticky?

  • Well, if you look up the word child, it's sweet that if there is a candy you can use for it on that kanji convene a deity or to stick Teoh, hence the word sticky.

  • Thus, we've solved the mystery off the sticky clerk.

  • Thank God, however, the really scary translations of the ones with Google has just conjured up words out of thin air.

  • On the 10th day of every month, we get a puppy robin with 500 yen on Pig Boat Day Pig Brain Day.

  • Why does that conjure up images of David Cameron?

  • Oh, yeah.

  • Now this is sinister because at no point in the sentence, is there any mention off puppies or dogs or animals?

  • Where did the word puppy come from?

  • The sentence literally says.

  • On the 10th day of every month on Pork Broth Day, you can eat or Peschel Ramen 500 yet or pesh on being the name of the restaurant.

  • Now, somehow Google turns or Peshawar into puppets, and I don't know how on Dive even sent this to a professional translator, a friend who's not re artery but another native speaker of Japanese.

  • And they don't have a clue either.

  • They just think it's a glitch with Google.

  • It just pulled the word puppy of nowhere.

  • Terrifying.

  • Is it a sinister conspiracy by Google to create puppy Rahman?

  • Definitely, definitely.

  • For me, the one of the most interesting aspects of learning a new language is discovering words in concepts that don't exist in your native tongue.

  • On.

  • In the case of Japanese, there are quite a few everyday words that can literally be translated into English.

  • For example, whenever you meet someone in Japan for the first time, you end your kind of personal introduction with the phrase your Oscar innovation month, which means please our favor upon.

  • That's the easiest way I can say.

  • But imagine going up to someone in the UK or the US and saying, Hi there.

  • I'm Chris.

  • Please have favor upon It might be a quick weight to lose friends, but it's a testament to the sheer politeness of the Japanese language that you're either apologizing or saying thank you to someone in advance of something that may or may know, even happen in the near future.

  • Let's see if we could break reiterate by getting him to translate it, but about words with friends.

  • It's, um, how do you say that?

  • A lot of scalding ash must in English?

  • Uh, nice to meet you.

  • I'm the person who is playing a game with you, and I'm order to Syria something like that.

  • But it doesn't exist in English, uh, mature.

  • On the flip side, there's also words that don't exist in Japanese like Brother How do you say Japanese?

  • You have any brothers cure that you must got killed.

  • I means sibling, sibling lost brother, depending on which brother talking about elder brother or younger brother Just my brother There is no There is no such awards for just a brother.

  • How many words out that brother Japanese une toe on each other?

  • Uh, I think like 45 I guess.

  • I mean, I can think of to be honest, as much as we'd marks Google translate today and kind of exposed it short comings is surprisingly good a lot of the time and at the very least you able to have a rough idea of what's being said.

  • And that's what most people want or need at the end of the day.

  • But Google translate is able to do something effortlessly that most new learners of Japanese really struggle today, which is flip the Japanese sentence around and reconstruct it to make it sound like English.

  • In English, we have subject verb object.

  • I went to the station in Japanese.

  • They have subject object verb.

  • I station went on.

  • Honestly, it took me months to wrap my head around this and to kind of rewire my thinking.

  • It might look easy on a simple sentence, but it gets more complicated as that sentence gets bigger.

  • For example, the person eating ice cream walk towards the station now in Japanese.

  • That would be ice cream, a taboo to restore our Aquino horny data literally ice cream ating person regarding the station in the direction off, walk towards on.

  • That is why your brain will crash.

  • We try to think literally between Japanese and English, he translated in your head, and it's why thinking fluently and Japanese early on is pretty difficult today.

  • But fortunately, as the weeks and months roll along and you keep studying, keep practicing.

  • Speaking, your brain does start to rewire itself.

  • It's one of the most stressful on rewarding experiences you can have, but it's a tough thing to explain, and that is why we've got reiterate when you, when you're translating between English Japanese, what's the thought process?

  • There is no thought plus a soul, because it's like a door when I speak Japanese, my Japanese drawers open and my English joys clothes, and when I speak English, Japanese Roy's closed dead English drawers opens, but what I speak the language.

  • I'm not so confident of appliances when I speak German.

  • When I speak Italian, both members, I'm not really confident.

  • Chances are the two doors open at seven time and you get all mixed up.

  • So what did we learn today?

  • We've learned that Google translate isn't that bad translating as long as it's a simple sentence.

  • And as long as the subject is clear on, we've learned that really.

  • Thoreau has an obsession with drawers.

  • If you have any more questions on learning the Japanese language do far away in the comments below and do check out the playlist on the broad Japan Channel.

  • Of all the Japanese, learning content is quite long, useful stuff there for beginners and learners.

  • For more behind the scenes content, check out their broad Japan patron.

  • But for now, guys is always many.

  • Thanks for watching.

  • We'll see you next time, as for May is Pig Bone Day.

  • So I'm off to a scam level store to get some chemical ramen with my comrades.

  • They're all very glad because I love pig Bone day.

  • I love Friday, actually.

  • What?

  • Fuck this Still a shot already.

  • What, 3 to 1.

I want you to imagine you just opened your very own restaurant on you.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 japanese google translate translate sentence sticky puppy

Why Google Translate FAILS at Japanese

  • 4 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/08/28
Video vocabulary