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  • "To be strong and to have speed is not the same as having power and quickness. These

  • are easily confused." Hi. James from engVid. I'm reading Miyamoto Musashi on strategy.

  • Hiya! Except Mr. Musashi said something rather interesting, and that's today's lesson. Confusing

  • words. You probably heard me talk about speed and strength being confused with power and

  • quickness. We native speakers regularly confuse it, thinking that they are the same things,

  • and there are other words that I know you probably have problems with, and maybe some

  • native speakers as well, and we're going to learn them today. You ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So. Confused words. Mr. E, Sensei. What do we have? "Everyday, I ain't learned nothing,

  • but may be I should have studied harder!" Okay, I'm putting on an accent and playing.

  • Mr. E is saying: "Every day..." And "ain't" is bad English. We've got a video on that,

  • so go check it out, okay? It talks about when people say it, and then you'll understand

  • my strange accent. Okay? And: "Learned nothing, but I should have studied harder." Well, there

  • are... There's a confused word here and here, and this word is wrong. When we finish the

  • lesson, you'll understand why I say that, and why these confuse people.

  • The first one we're going to do is "study" versus "learn." What does it mean to study,

  • and what does it mean to learn? It's often been said: "You can study a lot, and learn

  • nothing." Why? Because learning, when you learn something, you gain knowledge by studying,

  • by practicing. You know, you play the piano again, and again, and again, that's practice.

  • You don't look at the keys, ding dong dong, you actually practice it to get it into your

  • body, so to speak. When you study, that's more like reading or trying to memorize things,

  • right? For a test.

  • So learning, you are going to gain a skill, or you will get knowledge. You will learn

  • something new, something you didn't understand, you will now understand. Okay? There's something

  • you will have. It may not be something you put in your hand, but it's something you put

  • in your head. Okay? And the best thing about it is not only have you put it in your head,

  • you can now take this information and use it to learn new things, or use it to do things.

  • Right? You can study how to make a cake, but when you learn how to make a cake, you have

  • a recipe. Right? And you can use that recipe again and again.

  • Studying is a little different. Why? Because studying is actually a part of learning. If

  • you look carefully up here, it says: "Studying, practicing, being taught." You know, somebody...

  • Somebody will teach you. You go and you get a teacher. A teacher says: "You're doing this,

  • this, this, and this." You're not reading and memorizing; someone is speaking to you.

  • And even when we talk about learning experience, right? Trust me: if you get hit by a car...

  • I've been hit by a car three times, man. Not fun. Riding a bicycle, boom! You learn: look

  • both ways, and be smart. You didn't have to memorize that. One hit by a car - you will

  • learn, okay? So, that's what learning means.

  • When you study, we talk about studying being reading, right? Memorizing facts, that means

  • trying to put it in your memory so you don't have to keep thinking about it. But another

  • thing about study which is a little confusing is when you attend school. What do I mean?

  • Well, when you attend school, you go for classes, right? So sometimes you hear people say: "What

  • do you study?" And they're talking about what is the subject, right? Or: "What are your

  • classes? Do you take mathematics?" You say: "I'm studying math, geography, and history

  • this term." Studying, that means memorizing some facts from these and reading about them.

  • Okay? Or: -"What are you studying?" -"The law. I'm going to get a law degree", or: "I'm

  • going to get a medical degree." You cannot learn a medical degree, you study for a medical

  • degree. So when we say "study," we talk about attending school. What school do you go to?

  • What subject, what classes?

  • And that is the difference between them, right? You can see: one is getting knowledge and

  • attaining knowledge, and if you study you will learn things. But you study degrees in

  • subjects like law and medicine. Not... There is no learning a degree for law or medicine.

  • Cool? But I can understand why students get confused, because they are part of each other,

  • or studying is a part of learning. So therefore, we can say: "Studying is one way of learning."

  • You can study grammar rules to learn grammar. True. Okay, and you will learn grammar. You

  • will understand it. However, to learn conversation, you need to practice. You can't study conversation.

  • You won't be good at it unless you practice it, which means to do. Right? Which is a little

  • different than studying some rules or reading in a book, right? Cool.

  • Just to give a, you know, couple little examples we have here: "I was studying until 4am."

  • In this case, we're talking about memorization, right? Reading, and trying to put in my memory,

  • information for a test I might have later on. Okay? I may or may not have learned. 4am

  • is a, you know, that's late at night. You might be a little tired and not... Didn't

  • learn anything, but at least you studied, right? "I learned how to make money." That's

  • a skill, okay? You can't always get that from a book or read about it; you got to go do

  • it. Sure, you can read about it, but until you practice it, it's not yours, and you don't

  • have that money. So once you have the money, you go: "Oh! I learned something from that

  • book. I studied it, now I learned." Cool? All right. We have two other lessons we're

  • going to do on confused words. This one should be clear to you.

  • And problem: if you notice, I put this up in the corner for you. Both are verbs. That's

  • one of the problems, because people use them as verbs: "I am studying, I am learning",

  • and they don't differentiate. And they are also related. That's the other thing that

  • makes it a problem. Because they're related. Remember what I told you: you can study to

  • learn. That relationship causes confusion in people's brains, right? "I'm studying,

  • I'm learning", they kind of go together, but they're different, okay? In the end, they're

  • different. All right? So, ready? We're going to go and do the next one in a second.

  • Okay. Let's do "maybe", "may be". Wow, I said the same word twice. Am I tired? No, it's

  • the next confusing word, or words. "Maybe" versus "may be". Okay? When we look at "maybe"

  • when it's one word, it's actually an adverb. It means perhaps or possibly. Right? You can

  • literally take "maybe" out of the sentence and put "perhaps" or "probably" and it will

  • make sense completely. Okay?

  • When we look at "may be", right? With that little pause, it actually means "could be",

  • "might be", or "would be". It's considered an auxiliary verb. Why? Because what we're

  • really looking at is a modal. We're looking at the modal "may" just as "could", "would",

  • and "might" are modals. Okay, understand? And we're joining the "be" verb. It's a helper

  • verb. Okay? So because of that, that's the difference between them. You cannot put "perhaps"

  • where you would put this; it wouldn't' make any sense. All right?

  • Now, we're going to go down and explain another thing where it has to do with you can't really

  • put verbs together, right? We have an auxiliary verb that helps, but you can't have two solid

  • verbs, or two main verbs together. So let's go here first: "Mr. E may be sleeping in his

  • room." So when we're saying that, what we're saying is: "Mr. E could be sleeping in his

  • room", or: "Mr. E might be sleeping in his room." If you noticed, I did a direct substitution,

  • and this sentence means exactly the same. Right? Now, when we say this... And that's...

  • When I should say that it's a possibility. Right?

  • When we look down here and we do the next one: "There are many people with stupid ideas,

  • and maybe they shouldn't express them", what we could put in instead here is "perhaps".

  • Right? "There are many people with stupid ideas, and perhaps they shouldn't express

  • them." It's the same meaning. Okay?

  • Now, if we try to do this... Right? "There are many people with stupid ideas and could

  • be they shouldn't express them." It makes no sense whatsoever. Okay? Because we're trying

  • to put in a modal verb with another modal verb, and it just doesn't work. You can't

  • do that in English. Okay?

  • Which leads me down here: "may be" is an auxiliary verb and shouldn't be used-noticed how I used

  • the modal over there?-with other modals. And then "maybe" like this is an adverb. It's

  • in red because I want you to remember that. Okay?

  • What's the problem here? Well, the problem here is both words look the same. I mean,

  • really, except for this small space, if I... If I did this, just even a small piece, you'd

  • think it's the same word. So what's the problem? And that's the problem that most of us native

  • speakers have, because sometimes you don't look carefully, and it's like: "It's the same.

  • Who cares? No one will notice.

  • " Yeah, well, some people who grammar will notice is the problem.

  • And the other problem we have is they sound the same. Remember I started off with: "We're

  • going to work on 'maybe' and 'may be'", and I scratched my head? I did that because, really,

  • how would you know the difference, unless you look at the paper? Cool? We got one more

  • to do, because you know, I like to give you a bargain for your money. Let's go.

  • Okay, so let's get back to our everyday lesson. What? Well, we're going to find out what that

  • means in about two seconds. Remember I said other confused words? "Every day" versus "everyday".

  • This has a similar problem to the last one we did. Okay? And the reason why I say that

  • is this: the only difference, really, between them is here's a space right here. See that

  • space? No space, and space. And they're both adjectives, as you can see on the board. So,

  • what's the real difference and what is the problem? Okay.

  • First of all, when we say: "Every day", there is a huge difference. We're talking about

  • here is "every" is an adjective. I'm not actually talking about "day", I'm adding that on. And

  • you can see later on after we do this, it's sort of "every" is an adjective that can be

  • added to anything, right? Every, everyone, every person. So it's an adjective that modifies

  • this "day". Right? "Day" is the noun. Okay? And when we say this, what we're actually

  • saying is something... Rather it's something is interesting, we're saying it's one of a

  • group. Because "days" are general, and we're talking about one of those days. And to simplify

  • it, think of these markers. Okay? Monday, Tuesday, Happy Days, Wednesday, Thur... Bad

  • TV program from the 80's. Don't worry. But look, every one of these markers... And I

  • said "every one", right? Using the adjective "every", one. Each marker is a single thing,

  • right? And "every" is the group, so we're talking about one marker out of the group.

  • Okay? And that's the one we're talking about here. All right? Cool?

  • Here's where the confusion comes in, because when we want to talk about not one of a group,

  • but normal or common, we can also say: "everyday" and that's a problem because... I'll give

  • you an example. These are my everyday clothes. I wear them... Not... It's not every day I

  • wear them. They're just common for me. They're normal. Okay? But when we talk about "every

  • day", we're trying to talk about each and every day. A little confusing? Not really.

  • Think of it again, once again, markers, we're talking about a group, but each individual

  • group. Right? And when we talk about "everyday", the single word without the space, is what

  • is normal or what is common. Cool? Good. Now, we've got...

  • Oh, before I forget: problem. What's the problem here? Well, they sound the same. Okay? I did

  • tell you there's a space, and that's the big thing that makes a difference, and also there's

  • a little different usage in each one. This one we're saying "every", we're talking really

  • about the adjective modifying the day. In this case, it is an adjective, but it's one

  • word to say normal or common for some other noun. All right? So space is a problem. Sound:

  • they sound the same. Look: except for the space, they look the same. And third problem:

  • they're both adjectives. Right? At least with the other one, we had something, it was a

  • little bit different. Right? So all three taken in toll. We're going to come back to

  • them. Right? We're going to come back to "maybe", we're going to come back to "every day", and

  • we're going to hit with "studied" and "learn" in a second, and do sort of a little quiz.

  • You ready? I know you are.

  • Okay. I've got a little exercise for us, but before we go there, let's take our quick notes.

  • Okay? "Study" is to memorize facts or go to school. "Learn" is to gain skill or knowledge.

  • "May be" is an auxiliary verb. Notice the space. Remember the space. "Maybe" together

  • is an adverb. Okay? "Everyday" means normal or common. And "every day" means being one

  • of a group. Now we've done the quick notes. Close your eyes for a second, try to remember

  • that. We're going to go to the board and give you a little test. You ready?

  • So: "Last night, instead of __________..."

  • We have "memorize". Memorize, memorize, memorize. Boom.

  • "...studying my English notes at home like I do __________,"

  • One of a group. One of a group. One of a group. Which one is one of a group?

  • "...every day," so be careful because you have to make sure there's a space between

  • the two words. Right? We got that space there. "...I went out with my friends."

  • Okay? Finished the first part.

  • Let's do the next one. All right? "__________ it would have been better..."

  • Perhaps. I didn't put it up here, but let's go here. Which one is perhaps? This one, right?

  • Remember? So "perhaps". When we talked about this one, we talked about the modal, and we

  • could put up here "could", right? And then "be", remember that. So let's go back to the

  • board. This is "perhaps", we just did that, so it's going to be one word. "Perhaps" is

  • one word. We can put this here: "maybe". Because if you put "perhaps": "Perhaps it would have

  • been better..." it means the same as: "Maybe it would have been better..."

  • Directly switch it. Okay?

  • We're going to go back here, and this is where I'm being not so nice. Happens at times. E's

  • gone. He's gone home, so I get to do this. My show. I tricked you. Look. Look at that.

  • "May be" again. I'm sorry, but, you know, I wanted you... I wanted you to take a look.

  • Remember there's a space. No space, space, and you could directly substitute. All right?

  • "I could be the best..." "I may be the best..."

  • "I would be the best..." Cool? All right. So:

  • "...the best student in the class, but if I keep going out and not doing my _________..."

  • This is... I got to be honest. This is awful, but at least you'll know what it means.

  • "Everyday" meaning normal study routine. Right? My everyday or my normal study routine. And

  • once again, you can substitute. "...I won't ________..."

  • And this is very important. What won't you learn? "I won't learn"... This is skill, I

  • want skill. Right? "...how to speak English."

  • All right, I'm sure you did well. Now, I want you to go to engVid, and you have some more

  • learning to do. Right? I want you to go to where? www.eng as in English, vid as in video.com

  • (www.engvid.com), where myself and Mr. E who's not here right now will be happy to help you

  • study and learn more every day. Cool? Great. I'm going to see you in a little bit. But

  • before I go, thank you once again.

  • Every day you come is another day you make me smile. Chow.

"To be strong and to have speed is not the same as having power and quickness. These

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A2 study studying space modal memorize problem

3 Commonly Confused WORD PAIRS in English

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    Summer posted on 2020/08/20
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