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  • Welcome to our first ever evening edition of this series.

  • Because the sound in the original video was destroyed.

  • Hi everybody, welcome back to Ask Alisha, the weekly series where you ask me questions

  • and I answer them, maybe!

  • The first question this week.

  • The first question this week comes from Patrick.

  • Hi Patrick!

  • Patrick says, “I know the basic English words and I understand if someone speaks in

  • English.

  • for example, I understand your videos perfectly but I have problems building correct English

  • sentences, like when I speak with another person.

  • Do you have any tips on how to build correct sentences?”

  • I think that this just comes with practice, honestly.

  • It's difficult to do but I know that there's not always a person that you can ask for help.

  • I will tell you a secret when I don't have confidence with something but I don't know

  • how to answer something this is what I do

  • “I google it.”'

  • Seriously, just google it.

  • I put quotation marks around like the phrase that I'm trying to make and then I search

  • Google for it and if it's there, great!

  • Then that means I can use it, maybe like thousands of people have used that phrase.

  • I know it's probably a common phrase if there are no results and that probably means I've

  • made a mistake somehow.

  • So, that's maybe one good way to help you as you try to build phrases by yourself.

  • So, try that out.

  • Next question!

  • Next question comes from Huang Sei Na.

  • Hi!

  • “I love your name, Alisha.

  • Is Alisha a common name in the US?

  • I happen to have a friend named Elisa also what's your personal favorite name?”

  • Um.

  • A common name in the US?

  • Alisha, I don't thinkAlishais so common in the US and when I was growing up I didn't

  • have any other friends namedAlisha.”

  • Also, the spelling of my name is a little strange.

  • Usually, it spelled “A-L-I-C-I-A.”

  • Maybe you know the artistAlicia Keys,” that's how she spells her name.

  • So, my name was commonly confused asAlicia” a lot.

  • So, like for example, Allison and Elisa and Ali and so on, those are fairly common I think,

  • butAlishaespecially my spelling is not so common actually.

  • So what's my favorite name?

  • My favorite name is Obi-Wan Kenobi.

  • Next question!

  • Next question comes from Long.

  • Is the 'H' sound not always pronounced when followed by another consonant?

  • For example, 'wall hanger' or 'come back home.'”

  • Yes, the “H” sound is often pronounced very softly.

  • It's quite difficult to pronounce all of these syllables clearly like in the example,

  • come back home,” it's quite difficult to say the “H” sound clearly.

  • So, in those cases, it's quite common to make the “H” sound quite soft likecome

  • back home.”

  • Next question!

  • Romeo from Vietnam.

  • Hi, again, Romeo!

  • Romeo says, “Hello, Alisha.

  • Do native speakers say, 'You aren't going to blah, blah, blah?'

  • Or, 'You're not going to blah, blah, blah.'

  • Which contracted form is used more?”

  • I think they're used equally like you can choose which you prefer.

  • Me, I think I usually sayyou're not going to.”

  • I probably useyou're,” I contractedyou are,” “you're not going to,”

  • or, “You're not going to do something?”

  • I probably useyou're notmore often thanyou aren't going to.”

  • Next question is from Wagner.

  • Wagner!

  • Wagner!

  • Vagner!

  • Have you written any operas?

  • Why do American people pronounce EnglishClassone-O-oneinstead ofone-zero-one

  • orhundred one?”

  • Oh!

  • This relates to like university and college level courses, actually.

  • So, there are four levels to universities, or it's colleges in the US, first year,

  • second year, third year and fourth year.

  • So, the classes for each of those are numbered.

  • So first-year classes begin with 1, second-year classes with 2, third-year classes with 3,

  • fourth-year classes with 4.

  • So, first-year classes, it tends to be like the basic classes begin with a 1 and like

  • the most basic of those classes is usuallyone-O-one.”

  • so like EnglishClass101, that's kind of making like a friendly introduction to English

  • in other words.

  • So we say, “one-O-One.”

  • We always use that sort of pattern when speaking we don't sayone-hundred and one,”

  • we always useone-O-oneor likeone-two-fouror likethree-six-seven.”

  • I don't know what those classes are but we always say each individual number.

  • Nice question though, interesting!

  • Next question is from Danny.

  • Would you tell us about? 'here you are,' 'here you go,' 'there you are,' 'there

  • you go' and 'here, there, we, you, it, baby go.'”

  • Oh, gosh!

  • Okay, I'll talk about the ones that you introduced.

  • What do they mean and how do you use them naturally?”

  • So, let's talk first abouthere you areandhere you go.”

  • So, we use these when we present someone with something.

  • So, you give someone something, “Here you are,” “here you go,” like you are at

  • a restaurant maybe your order arrivesHere you are.”

  • Here you go.”

  • Something like in a service situation you might hear this kind of form like a friendly

  • staffish, like a staff-related person, I suppose.

  • Here you are.”

  • Here you go.”

  • Or maybe from a teacher to a school child maybe, “Here you go.”

  • We use it to like present something, to present an object that maybe they are expecting to

  • receive

  • Let's talk then aboutthere you goandthere you are.”

  • We usethere you gowhen someone is able to do a thing they've been practicing

  • for a while.

  • For example, if the child is learning how to ride a bicycle and they've been struggling

  • with it for some time but then gradually they get better at it and they can do it the parent

  • might sayOh!

  • There you go!

  • You got it!

  • You got it!”

  • It's like a support word and encouragement word, “There you go.”

  • The last one on your list though, “there you are.”

  • In American English, we usethere you arein a situation where we're looking for someone,

  • we've been looking for someone we're expecting to meet and it's been difficult to find

  • them.

  • Maybe you visit a few different spots, but then, at last, you find this person.

  • Maybe like in a break room or someplace you might not expect them but when you do find

  • them and you say, “Oh, there you are!”

  • We say it with that sort of intonation, “Oh, there you are!”

  • It sounds immediately to the listener like, “Oh, this person has been looking for me.”

  • Next question!

  • Next question is from L-O-J.

  • L-O-J?

  • Loj?

  • Loj says, “My question is about phrasal verbs.

  • What is the meaning of 'knock out' like here, examples sentence 1, 'Knocked me out

  • of my possession,' or 2, 'Knocked the wind out of me.'

  • I had a problem with the word 'possession,' “Knocked me out of my possession.'”

  • I'm not quite sure.

  • This could refer, though, too, in a very rare situation.

  • We have this wordpossessionwhich refers to like this thing calleddemonic possession,”

  • where there's this idea that a bad spirit gets into the body and controls a person's

  • behavior.

  • We call thatpossession.”

  • So, we could say like, “A priest knocked me out of my possession.”

  • To go back to your original question though, the wordknock out,” as a phrasal verb,

  • to knock outmeans like forcefully or forcibly remove something because of some

  • impact an object is removed from its original location.

  • So, for example, a jogger could be coming at me and they run into me and they knock

  • my phone out of my hands.

  • So, in that case, my phone is being removed because of the impact of the jogger.

  • So, “to knock something outmeans like to remove from its original location from

  • force.

  • In your second example then, “knocked the wind out of me,” this is an expression we

  • use which means like to lose our breath because of an impact.

  • If you get punched or kicked maybe this area, you might feel the air in your lungs come

  • out of your body.

  • So, we call thatthe windin this situation.

  • So, “He knocked the wind out of me,” means he caused me to lose the air in my lungs,

  • the impact was so strong in my body, that the air came out of my out of my lungs.

  • So, “he knocked the wind,” so the wind, in this case, the air in my lungs in its original

  • location was removed from me because of this impact.

  • You might also hear this expression in boxing, “to knock outorto KOsomeone

  • means to cause them to lose consciousness, in this case.

  • So, “consciousnessis the thing that's going away, in this case.

  • So, “to knock someone out in a boxing matchmeans they lose consciousness, in other words,

  • a “KOwas sometimes said.

  • The first example sentence is not actually so clear to me.

  • It's also possible there's an error in the original place, I don't know.

  • Alright, those are all the questions that I want to answer this week.

  • Thank you very much for sending your questions to me.

  • Remember, you can send them to me at EnglishClass101.com/ask-alisha.

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