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  • Jeremy Corbyn has launched Labour's general election manifesto and vowed to transform the United Kingdom if they win.

  • He unveiled the wide ranging plans in Birmingham, promising what he called a green transformation of the economy on a manifesto for hope a Labour government would nationalise rail, mail, water and energy companies.

  • They would build it least 150,000 new council and social homes every year until 2025 levels not seen since the late seventies.

  • Mr Corbyn said that be a one off windfall tax on oil companies to pay back the damage done to the climate.

  • They'll be big tax increases on higher earners and companies to pay for the plans.

  • Here's our political editor, Laura Kuhns Beg Her report Contains flash photography.

  • Is it time?

  • Time for a much bigger state?

  • Time for a government to spend and tax more time for a leader in its head who strongly believes the answer's yes rapture and some of his ranks but who presides over a party where there are still even dates about him.

  • Labour's manifesto is a manifesto for hope, a manifesto that full of popular policies that's the political establishment has blocked for a generation, labour is on your side.

  • On.

  • There could be scarcely a clearer demonstration of that than a furious reaction of the richest and most powerful.

  • He'd write.

  • Huge cheques paid forward the public purse, using higher taxes on business and the wealthy spending on changing the rules.

  • Our investment blitz will rebuild our schools.

  • Our hospitals care homes on the housing so desperately need this will Bay investment on a scale you've never known before will launch the biggest council house building programme since the 19 sixties.

  • Andi cap rents.

  • He promised tough new targets for scrapping carbon emissions.

  • Extra free care for the elderly.

  • Universal Credit benefit system would go along with university fees.

  • In England, there was nine familiar chance among the crowd.

  • Labour would not privatize any more of the health service.

  • But when it comes to the biggest issue in the country right now, only a careful restatement of the position Jeremy Corbyn won't say whether he would stay or leave.

  • He'd ask you on the you again.

  • We will secure a sensible deal that protects manufacturing and the Good Friday agreement on, then put it to a public vote alongside the option off remaining in the EU.

  • So let's take this out of the hands of politicians and give the British people the final say with no final decision on Europe.

  • No final decision on you.

  • Immigration.

  • And it's not just the scale of the leadership's plan that's controversial.

  • A small group of Jewish protesters were outside Mr Corbyn.

  • No undeterred.

  • It's time for riel change.

  • Thank you, Theo.

  • What do you think the whole country wants much, much bigger spending on a much, much bigger state.

  • Because this manifesto is put rocket boosters on what you promised in 2017 and it didn't convince the country to give you a majority then yes, it is a radical manifesto.

  • But you travel around this country and you talk to people radical answers and what's necessary not having up from the table that matches the scale of the problem we face at the moment in the 21st century.

  • If we can get biggest beyond Brexit labour, win this election, do you think he's gonna be moving into number 10 from is my son that we could place and feet for days?

  • Does he play with whatever family plans there are for Downing Street.

  • This election is a huge and serious moment for the Labour leader and for all of us.

  • Jeremy Corbyn heads off around the country being no doubt his manifesto isn't about tinkering around the edges but offering a totally different way of running the country.

  • But there are doubts over whether it's realistic or whether the country is ready for him.

  • Elections are about bold statements on big platforms that millions of small moments to weigh face an epic decision in a few weeks time, but it will be taken one by one.

  • Americans By BBC News Birmingham Well, Labour's multibillion pound plans would mean the biggest increases in spending, tax and borrowing we've seen in peacetime history.

  • That's according to the leading think tank, the Institute for Fiscal Studies are economics editor Faisal Islam has been looking at Labour's proposals and what impact they could have on the economy.

  • Faisal.

  • This is a radical attempt to change Britain's business model, involving not just huge amounts of public spending and investment, but also attempt to rewire the way the economy works.

  • There would be significant sums going to schools and reopening sure start centres for pre school Children about £16 billion on more than 18 year.

  • Also to deal with health care on social care in particular.

  • And five billion a year will be spent on an immediate inflation busting pay rise on later earnings increases for public sector workers.

  • Alongside other pledges, £83 billion in spending rises matched yes by £83 billion in extra taxes that Labour says it can squeeze from business and the rich.

  • Firstly, for example, a whopping £24 billion will be raised by reversing corporation tax cuts.

  • That's the tax on business profits.

  • Higher taxes for the top 5% of earners those on more than £80,000 include a 50 p rate for those earning over 125,000.

  • And this is new a major change to the taxation of wealth making capital gains tax rates.

  • The same is income tax so as high as 50 p rather than 28 feet.

  • Raising 14 billion is our massive sums raised from a small number of wealthy people and businesses and raise real questions.

  • Labour's tax and spending plans would take both tax and spending to levels not seen in the UK in peace time.

  • These are very big plans, indeed, 80 billion of tax rises, they say, just from companies and the rich in practice, tax on companies affect all of us anyway.

  • But if you want this scale of transformation, you're actually gonna have to have a broader set of tax increases than that.

  • Onda affect many more people to the £83 billion extra day to day spending for the public sector.

  • There's also long term spending on, for example, creating 100,000 council homes a year at that borrowed money to the investment in a green industrial revolution.

  • On you get to a large sum of extra spending about 140 £1,000,000,000 a year, roughly the size of NHS England annual spend hundreds off billions over the parliament.

  • Interestingly, the other parties are offering some similar ideas.

  • Using government spending power to borrow cheaply to invest hundreds of billions in a green future.

  • The labour has pushed this by far the furthest.

  • It is a decisive shift of Britain to a bigger state, taxing big business, more taking spending and taxation to levels in the British economy not seen outside of a crisis for decades.

  • But as high as that is in UK history, it is just above German levels and it's actually around the average for Europe.

  • Sophie, Thank you, Jeremy Corbyn says that Labour's plans are radical and are about bringing people together.

  • The parties also promising all workers at least £10 an hour for the so called riel living wage, with public sector employees getting a 5% pay rise as well, fell off a free personal care toe over 65 in England on in higher education.

  • Labour says they will abolish tuition fees and bring back maintenance grants on the crucial issue of Brexit labor, promising to re negotiate a new deal with the EU and then have another referendum.

  • Although Mr Corbyn will not say how he would vote, our political correspondent, Alex Foresight has been to Hastings a marginal seat with a small Tory majority that voted to leave the EU to find out what voters there make of the plans.

  • There is a battle in Hastings.

  • This seaside town was narrowly won by the Tories in 2017.

  • Now this working fishing port is exactly the kind of seat Labour needs for an election victory on the edge of town.

  • Staff at this manufacturing business had half a near on Labour's offer today.

  • For some long term supporters, it was persuasive.

  • I believe in 1000 people believe in good national Health service education.

  • I believe in all the things everybody else believes.

  • I actually believe that Labour will do more normal.

  • People think he plans to take a lot of that money from the rich.

  • Hey, incorporation of them from, you know, classes.

  • So I think that's a good way to go.

  • And I think the British rail should be nationalised.

  • There are some 60 employees here making high end electrical switches in sockets.

  • Some of the many Labour wants to win round.

  • Cameron, an apprentice, was attracted by uni without the fees.

  • So is that money part that's put me away from a really?

  • So if there were no fees that might change your mind 100% If there's no fees are going up.

  • That's the same for a lot more people my age.

  • Labour's pitch is investment across the board, but some aren't convinced.

  • How can you say you're gonna find all this money when all the other parties down a lot.

  • They've all done the same thing, but they found the money.

  • So where does he think he's gonna find it from?

  • For many voters, credibility is an issue in this contest.

  • Who will deliver what's promised?

  • Jeremy Corbyn might hope this broader far on domestic policy has wide appeal, not least to those whose priority isn't Brexit.

  • Problem he has, is how that goes down with Labour supporters who wanted to leave.

  • You don't want another referendum.

  • The many fishermen in Hastings fed up with you quotas.

  • Brexit is the biggest thing in this election.

  • This industry might have had lever traditions here, but there's a loss of faith.

  • Why have another referendum?

  • Is that the best of free?

  • It's a nonsense.

  • You've had a Democratic decision made by the people and that should be upheld.

  • It was 10 million and one voted to come out.

  • 10 million voted to go in.

  • We should come out the anger, clear the angling association disappointment with pledges and promises.

  • All this business about what they're gonna do when I get in, they're gonna give you free this free that they're going to give.

  • I don't believe it.

  • I don't believe anything any more convincing voters in these key seats could win or lose this election crucial could be how Labour's policy offer compares to Brexit frustration on exports like BBC News.

  • Hastings, Lord Inspect is here now, so labour planning to spend and borrow huge sums of money.

  • It would be like anything we have seen for decades.

  • It's a really, really huge change that they're arguing for a big departure from what's being the sort of political norm for the last few decades.

  • But they believe that massive price tag is worth it because they think the country needs massive changes.

  • But it would be really, really dramatic in a way, watching Jeremy Corbyn and listening German me to Jeremy Corbyn today, it's kind of felt to me like it's the manifesto that he's always wanted to present.

  • You know, he's been the Labour leader for four years and it was kind of an application for the principles that he's known for in a 2000 and 19 setting.

  • The big risk, of course, for the Labour Party is whether or not there are enough people in the country who are actually up for the really dramatic scale of change that they are arguing for the polls, which we should be careful about, but the polls at the moment suggest probably not, but they'll actually three weeks tonight, and we saw last time in 2000 and 17 that the manifesto day for the Labour Party didn't get them to number 10.

  • But it did create a big moment in the campaign that began to change the dynamics.

  • Meanwhile, today, some new figures about the amount of money that's being donated to political parties since and started the campaign.

  • That's right, an astonishing the you know, in a way, when you look at it as a zone outsider.

  • The Conservatives had £5 million being poured into their coffers in the first week of the election campaign.

  • That's around 25 times equivalent amounts that were given to the Labour Party and to the Lib Dems.

  • Really important to say, though, that they are all subject to the same spending limits in this campaign.

  • So just because different parties have got different amounts pouring in or not, it doesn't mean that during the campaign they will actually be spending very, very different amounts around the country.

  • But if anything is another reminder of just what the contrasts I like in this campaign.

  • And I know I've said it before.

  • I think I'll say it again in the next few weeks.

  • This time we cannot say they're all the same.

  • Our political editor.

  • Look, inspect.

  • Thank you.

Jeremy Corbyn has launched Labour's general election manifesto and vowed to transform the United Kingdom if they win.

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UK Election 2019: Labour Manifesto Launch - BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/07/02
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