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  • Hey guys! I'm Loretta and welcome to my channel KemushiChan.....blehhh

  • I AM SUPER PUMPED RIGHT NOW!

  • In my last video which was way too long ago

  • I shared a secret file folder where I used to keep all of my audio diaries, where I would practice Japanese.

  • "Konban wa. Kyou wa ichigatsu juunana-nichi..."

  • So as promised, today is Part 2 of Embarassing Myself...for the Sake of Learning :P.

  • You guys ready for the cringe?

  • Konban wa! Kyou wa ichigatsu juunana-nichi. (Good evening! Today is January 17th.)

  • Kyou kara wa, maa, kyou mo, yukkuri (Starting today, today, we.., I'm going to take my time)

  • atarashiku benkyou shita kotoba wo tsukatte (and use the new Japanese words I just learned)

  • benkyou shitai to omotteimasu. (I want to study those today).

  • Good! This already sounds a lot smoother. These are probably phrases I use all the time in the audio diaries.

  • I'm probably use to saying these things.

  • The only thing is that there's a lot of 'EETOO' (umm...)

  • People think that if you talk fast in a 2nd language

  • then you must be good, and that's not neccessarily the case.

  • Instead of just saying "um" all the time, I could've just taken a breath

  • to slow down a bit, and that would've been totally fine.

  • Ja, ikimasu. Here we go.

  • Seiji toka, seifu ni kanren aru kotoba toka (So politics, and government related words)

  • muzukashii to iu yori mo (they're difficult yes, but more importantly,)

  • sugoi tokuteiteki na kotoba wo benkyou shimashita. (I learned some real specific words.)

  • "SUGOI TOKUTEI janakute, sugoku". or "hijouni". Not "REAL specific, but really". Also, "extremely" works too.

  • "sugoi" when it should be "sugoku", that's a casual way of speaking that I still do today.

  • "Sugoku" is an adverb and we use ADVERBS to modify verbs!

  • tatoeba, kyou no nyuusu houkoku. (Let's take today's news report as an example.)

  • kyou no nyuusu dewa, seiji no kaikaku no houkoku ga arimashita. (In today's news there was a story about government reform.)

  • HAHA! matta houkoku to kaikaku wo tsukaimashita! (Haha! I used the words for REPORT and REFORM in a sentence!)

  • Hontou ni wasuretakunai kotoba wa, sono, maa, kaikaku (So, I really don't want to forget these words. Well, you know, "reform")

  • kaikaku to kaishi desu ne. "reform" and to "begin".

  • "Shiai wa kuji-kaishi desu." So iu kotoba to (The game will begin at 9. Words like that and)

  • kaihatsu mo. ato, hyouka mo wasuretakunai desu. ("develop", and also to "rate/evaluate" are words I don't want to forget.)

  • I was really into using iKnow.jp , which would slam you with N3 N2 is words.

  • I knowww kaikaku. I used that so much in YouTube videos.

  • Like "kyouiku no kaikaku wo suru hitsuyou ga aru to omoimasu." (Saying like, I think we need to reform our education!)

  • So what's happening now is that I'm just TRYING to use these words in Japanese

  • because I have no chance to use them otherwise.

  • tatoeba, ookii kaisha...ookii kigyou ga (For example, a big company...er, a big corporation)

  • atarashikute chiisai kaisha ni toushi suru. (Makes a new investment in a little company.)

  • There's a cat outside...

  • The point is, I wanted to use these verbs that I had learned.

  • I wanted to talk about "invest" because that's a cool, fun word.

  • You can tell I don't know what I'm talking about because

  • you don't say "ookii kaisha" or "ookii kigyou", you say "daikigyou" in Japanese.

  • "chuushoukigyou", a small or medium-sized business

  • bencha-kigyou (venture), sutaato appu kigyou (start-up)

  • You don't even say a big company invests into a little company

  • there's a better word than "toushi suru"

  • it would be "baishuu", to actually buy-up the company.

  • The point is that, I didn't know how to use these words in a sentence

  • but I would be DARNED if I didn't try!

  • So this is just me tryin to use the word "toushi suru".

  • Watashi ha yotsu no kaisha ni toushi shiteimasu. (I've invested in 4 companies.)

  • Yep. Just like a I thought. so "Toushi suru" is a verb more commonly used with individual investments.

  • When a company invests in another company, this can be a "buyout" or an "acquisition"

  • and there are words for that in Japanese. "Baishuu" (buy-out), "baikyaku" (to sell a company).

  • but in this case I actually had an example that I wanted to use.

  • So when I found the word "toushi suru", I clearly had made a note of an example sentence to learn with it.

  • sekkyokuteki ni ganbatteiru ne! I'm really giving it my all, though!

  • watashi wa nihongo kyouiku no kanren aru kaisha wo tsukuritai. (I want to make a Japanese-learning related company).

  • desu kedo, sou dekiru tame (However, for me to do that)

  • nihongo kyouiku ni kanren aru kaisha ga watashi no kaisha ni toushi suru hitsuyou ga aru. (A bigger Japanese-learning company would need to invest into my company for that to happen.)

  • toiu iikata de tsukaitai to omotteimasu. (I want to be able to talk about it like that.)

  • Wow, I had some big dreams back in the day!

  • Nihongo kyouiku - kei no kaisha. A company for learning Japanese.

  • sou dekiru tame... (For that to be...)

  • Not, "sou dekiru tame" it's, "sou dekiru you ni"

  • [Trying to rephrase it better] Nihongo kyouiku-kei no kaisha wo tsukuritai n desukedo I want to make a company for Japanese learning

  • sono hitotsu no houhou toshite so as one way to do this,

  • nihon no kaisha ni baikyaku suru koto wo mezashiteimasu. (I'm working towards selling my company to a bigger Japanese company.)

  • Ato wa nan desho... (Was that about it then???)

  • sono gurai desu ne. Ja, bai bai. (That's about it then. Ok, bye.)

  • This is only about a year after the file that we first watched.

  • The way that I'm speaking at this point, this is 2011, about 7 years ago.

  • In terms of fluidity and the ability to glue words together

  • That's here, with "mochiron", "yappari", "maa", "eetou".

  • Those filler words are there, gluing sentences together like I still do today.

  • And what was missing was a lot of collocations.

  • For example, knowing that a company does not invest into another company, it acquires it.

  • Just known what words are usually paired with what other words.

  • In English, we have words that sound unnatural or a bit weird

  • these are often dictated by collocations.

  • For example, you can say "turn off the lights"

  • and you can say "shut off the lights", but you don't say "close the lights".

  • "Shut" and "close" basically mean the same thing but why can you only use one with the words "lights" ?

  • The best way to get familiar with collocations is to listen to more natural speech.

  • For example, if I want to be able to speak about business and companies

  • in a more fluid, native-sounding way

  • then what I should do is start listening to podcasts that talk more about business news

  • start listening to actual news clips every morning

  • honestly, just listening to the news, just brief news

  • would've probably been the best thing to do at that point.

  • So you find your topic, find the way to say that word in Japanese

  • So business for me is "keiei", "gappe" for mergers, "baikyaku" for corporate sales

  • if those are the words I wanted to study then I should just google those

  • find clips that talk about it, maybe even on YouTube.

  • and just listen to those, you know, keep clips of those!

  • I have a whole folder of audio clips from Bilingirl Chika so that I could imitate her

  • because she speaks very clearly and it's very good to listen to

  • but for more senmon yougo (technical terms)

  • just looking up the name of that field and then finding clips on YouTube.

  • Maybe the best way to really brush up your collocations.

  • Your sense of knowing what words always go with what words.

  • Words always come in pairs, and to be able to learn them in a top-down method

  • you're seeing the whole picture, and just learning to imitate that.

  • What I was doing was a bottom-up method

  • I was learning each word 1 by 1 and trying to use them in my daily life.

  • That shows a lot of initiative but in order to sound more natural

  • in addition to try as much as I could on my own

  • I should've also had more native samples of Japanese to imitate as well.

  • Oh! I recorded my OPI exam!

  • What did I sound like when I was actually being tested...

  • Mazu, kono denwa no onshitsu chotto warui no de (Before we start, this phone connection is bad)

  • ookii koe de hanashite itadakemasu ka? (so could I ask you speak more loudly, please?)

  • Woooow, ok! I'm just BuStiNnn InnN~!

  • denwa no onshitsu ga warui no de (the phone call quality is bad so)

  • ookii koe de hanashite itadakemasuka? (could I ask you to speak up please?)

  • I'm suprised! I was even using Keigo!

  • Before the OPI I had told my professor that I was nervous about speaking politely.

  • There's a polite section that you have to do.

  • I can't memorize all those verbs! I already know "taberu", why do I need "meshiagaru"?!

  • She was like, don't worry about all that, you can just use the words you know

  • and use  て + いただけますか? "can you do this for me?"

  • and if someone DID do something for you て + くださいました

  • I probably memorized that so that I could start with something and tell them 'I can speak well!'

  • I probably wanted to make a good first impression.

  • By telLiNg Them WhAt To DoOO?!

  • ima wa new york-shi no manhattan no tokoro desu ne (I'm at a place in Manhattan, New York, yes.)

  • Ima shigoto wo shiteimasu. (I work here).

  • setsumei-teki ni chotto fukuzatsu nanndesu kedo... (to kinda describe it, my job's kinda complicated, ya know?)

  • I do that a lot, use "teki ni" to make words, like a crutch.

  • You could just say "setsumei shinikui" (hard to explain).

  • When they ask you a question, buy yourself some time, deep breath, prepare yourself

  • to answer those questions by saying 'sou desune'.

  • if anyone asks you something, just say SOU DESU NE

  • I think they're asking about a scary scene with my dog.

  • kore wa, jibun no sei kamoshirenai n desukedo (This is probably my fault but...)

  • sengetsu datta kamoshirenai (this was around last month)

  • Lily to iu n desu kedo, lily to issho ni sanpo shiteiru toki ni (My dog's name is Lily, but we were out for a walk)

  • de, mou kaerou to omotte, de (and, I figured we should back and, ...and...)

  • sono roopu wo hazushitara (so when I let her off the leash)

  • koko de matteite, iiko da ne, to yattara (I was like, good girl, wait here!)

  • sugu dasshu de, nigechatte, (she immediately took off in a sprint)

  • to michi no naka de wan wan wan to nigetari shite (and just ran down the street barking.)

  • sugoi, taihen, mou, nan to iu kana (Wow, like, it was crazy, omg, like how do I say it....)

  • kowakatta kedo, saigo no, oyatsu wo mottara (I was so scared but eventually I got a treat)

  • sugu kaette kureta no de (and she came right back).

  • daijoubu datta kedo, sore ga taihen deshita. (nothing happened but it was pretty crazy.)

  • The issue I'm having here is a lot of issues with the subject and the predicate

  • who's doing what, "wo" vs "ga"

  • I said "rope" but I took off my dog's leash and she ran away through the streets.

  • Rope wo hazushitara, kou yatte, wan wan wan to nigetari shite (I took off the rope, and like, ran away barking)

  • That sounds like I took off the rope and then I started running through the streets barking.

  • Obviously my dog is the one who ran away barking

  • But that's not a succinct and clear as it could've been.

  • watashi wa Lily to issho ni sanpo shiteitandesukedo... (I was out for a walk with Lily)

  • When you start a story, the opening sentence often ends with " n desu kedo"

  • watashi wa Lily to issho ni sanpo shiteitandesukedo... (I was out for a walk with Lily)

  • Lead wo hazushitara, Lily ga, wan wan wan to iinagara (When I removed her leash then LILY barked)

  • nigete shimashita. (while she ran away.)

  • Adding in "Lily ga", I forgot to do that,