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  • What's going on guys, welcome back to another lesson with me Tom. Today we're looking at

  • ten past time expressions that you should be using in your every day English. This is

  • going to be super useful guys and hang around for the final phrase because that is one of

  • my favourite English expressions of all time. Don't go anywhere!

  • If you want to tell a story that happened in the past you are going to need past time

  • expressions. Now we probably all know about things like 'yesterday' or 'last night' or

  • 'last week'. Here are ten more that perhaps you don't know that you should be using to

  • help you tell your stories.

  • Guys before we get started, make sure you hit that subscribe button and that notification

  • bell so that you don't miss any of my English lessons. Alright!

  • Because these are all past time expressions we're going to be using a past tense. So it

  • could be past simple, it could be the past continuous. Possible you might be using the

  • past perfect with a past simple tense so any past tense will work perfectly with these

  • past time expressions. Do not use the present perfect with any of these past time expressions

  • because these are points in the past that are now finished, they are complete. So we

  • can't sue the present perfect to link it to now. So only past tenses.

  • Let's start off with a very British English phrase 'a fortnight ago'. A fortnight is two

  • weeks or fourteen days. It's a very British expression, I don't think they use this in

  • American English. The 'ago' tells us that it's in the past so a fortnight ago. That's

  • telling us that it was two weeks in the past. The pronunciation fortnight. A fortnight ago.

  • Let's put that into an example sentence 'They moved house a fortnight ago.' This phrase

  • I use all the time 'ages ago'. If we use the word 'ages' it means a long time, we don't

  • know exactly how long but a very long time so if I say 'ages ago' it was a long time

  • in the past. An example sentence 'My last holiday was ages ago'. So my last holiday

  • was a long time ago in the past, ages ago.

  • Here's a super useful one. Ok, so today is Friday, let's say today is Friday. Yesterday

  • was Thursday, how do I describe Wednesday? It's kind of tricky. Yesterday was Thursday,

  • what's Wednesday? Alright, the phrase we use 'the day before yesterday'. That makes sense.

  • Ok, the day before yesterday. So 'I went swimming the day before yesterday.' Now we can play

  • with this structure, so it doesn't have to be the day before yesterday we could use week

  • or month or year. Now let's use it with week, ok. So 'the week before last'. Now what we

  • are really saying is the week before last week. So not last week, the week before last

  • week. Now we are not saying that final week just because we understand, we know what it

  • means. So the week before last is two weeks ago. Not last week, the week before that,

  • two weeks ago. The week before last. You could say the year before last. So this year is

  • 2017 so the year before last is 2015, that's right 2015. So the year before last. So we

  • use this kind of structure to help us to talk about not last year or last week but the one

  • before that one. Quite useful. So an example 'I went to Canada the year before last.' If

  • we want to look at a certain period in our lives we can use the structure 'when I was...'

  • so 'when I was a child'. So now I'm focusing on that period of time. The time when I was

  • a child. 'When I was a child we lived in France', it's not true but it's an an example sentence.

  • You can change that so 'when I was a teenager'. 'When I was teenager I loved playing football.'

  • Now with this phrase you can also use used to or would to talk about past habits. 'So

  • when I was a child we used to go and see my Grandma every week.' So you can use used to

  • or would to talk about past habits as well. Now if you are not sure how to use used to

  • or would I've done a video, you can check it out right now. I'll put the link right

  • above. So when I was and then a thing so when I was a child, when I was a teenager, when

  • I was a uni student, whatever you want.

  • This is a fantastic informal expression to describe a time in the past that's quite recent

  • but not specific so not definitely yesterday or the day before yesterday but another time.

  • We say 'the other day'. So I use this all the time, if I'm telling a friend about you

  • know I saw a TV programme I'll say 'I saw this great programme the other day.' And it

  • just means in the past maybe two days ago, three days ago, doesn't really matter. That's

  • not the important thing, the most important thing is the TV programme that I want to tell

  • you about. Not really when I saw it. So, the other day is a really nice way to say, a couple

  • of days in the past, it's not important when, 'the other day'.

  • Another really nice expression to talk about an undefined period of time in the past is

  • 'a while ago'. Now again it's a long time in the past, kind of similar to ages, I feel

  • like ages ago seems like it's a much longer time ago. A while ago is yeah, is quite a

  • long time in the past but we don't know exactly when and that's not important we don't really

  • care when it was but it was long enough in the past to be a while ago. An example sentence

  • 'The last time I saw John was a while ago.' Often when we are talking about past time

  • we'll just use the day or the month or the year. Now let's get our prepositions perfect

  • for these. So when we are talking about days we use on. So 'on Sunday I went to the cinema.'

  • For months we'll use in. So 'in February I went to Japan.' And of course with years again

  • we are using in 'I moved to Hong Kong in 2012.' Obviously these time phrases could be used

  • not just in the past but also in the future. But specifically we are talking about the

  • past today so remember it's on with the day of the week, in with the month and in with

  • the year. If we want to talk about a moment that literally just happened. It was not very

  • long ago, very recently in the past we could say 'a second ago'. Now it's not literally

  • one second but we are using it to talk about a very recent time in the past. A second ago

  • 'John was here a second ago.' John was here very recently, he's not here now but maybe

  • a minute ago, two minutes ago he was here. So John was here a second ago. Again ago tells

  • us that it's in the past and a second a very short period of time. A second ago. And finally,

  • probably in my top three favourite English expressions. Yeah I think so, top three definitely.

  • This is so good! So this phrase 'back in the day.' We are using it to describe a past time

  • not specific, we don't know when and we use it often to talk about memories and quite

  • often happy memories. 'Back in the day I used to listen to a lot of hip hop.' Right, so

  • we are using used to, ok? So it's a past habit, so this one we can use with a past tense or

  • yeah a past habit like used to or would. So 'Back in the day I used to listen to a lot

  • of hip hop.' So in a past time, not specific, probably when I was young, I listened to a

  • lot of hip hop, ok? So hip hop music. So 'Back in the day I used to listen to a lot of hip

  • hop.' Another example 'Back in the day my dad had a moustache.' And it was an amazing

  • moustache as well. So in the past, some time in the past, when I was young, my dad had

  • a moustache, ok. 'I remember back in the day people used to smoke in pubs.' Alright so

  • there, I remember back in the day, so a long time ago in the past, people used to smoke,

  • smoke cigarettes in the pub. So that's a great example of an informal phrase, very natural

  • phrase that you are not going to find in your English course books but it's a phrase that

  • you are going to hear in conversations on TV things like that. So back in the day is

  • easily in my top three favourite phrases of all time. And I hope it becomes yours as well.

  • Eat Sleep Dreamers which of those phrases were brand new for you? Which ones didn't

  • you know before you watched this video? Let me know in the comment below and also if you

  • want to put them into a practice sentence for me then please do and I will come down

  • and I will have a look at it. I'll correct it if it needs correcting. I love to see you

  • guys practising your English because that's how we improve right? We learn something,

  • we practise it and then it becomes a part of us. So yes, put your practice sentence

  • into the comments below. If you haven't already guys remember to hit that subscribe button,

  • hit that notification bell and remember I've got new videos every Tuesday and every Friday

  • helping you take your English to the next level. Thank you so much for hanging out with

  • me guys, I can't wait to see you again. This is Tom, the Chief Dreamer, saying goodbye.

What's going on guys, welcome back to another lesson with me Tom. Today we're looking at

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A2 fortnight week phrase day hip hop hip

10 Past Time Expressions You Should Know | English Vocabulary

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    Summer posted on 2020/06/08
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