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  • - Oh, boy.

  • Electrogonnorhea, that's not fun.

  • - Okay.

  • (screams)

  • - You're making this doctor not know anything. (laughs)

  • - This is actually a lot harder than I remember.

  • I might have been better at this as a kid.

  • (fun music)

  • - Don't believe anything we tell you.

  • - Hidden among us is a real doctor

  • and it's your job to figure out who it is.

  • - We will compete in three rounds of challenges.

  • - Before revealing the truth.

  • - Can you figure it out?

  • (air whooshing)

  • - I'm Dr.Le'mika Johnson

  • and I've been a pediatrician for 12 years.

  • I love being a pediatrician.

  • It's always been my passion.

  • I just love the bond that I have with all of my patients.

  • - Hi, my name is Dr.Johnson Lee.

  • I am a plastic surgeon.

  • I've been in practice for five years.

  • I've always wanted to help people

  • and in terms of being a plastic surgeon,

  • it really maximizes the technical ability.

  • And also, you really make people happy to see you.

  • - My name's Dr.Becca Beberaggi

  • and I've been a pediatrician for the past two years.

  • I like really getting involved with the patients

  • and working with the parents

  • and really helping them with the health of their children.

  • One of the challenges of being a pediatrician,

  • I would say is the paperwork that I have to do.

  • It's a lot.

  • And since I'm new I haven't really found my flow yet.

  • - I'm Dr. David Amitai.

  • I have been working as a doctor of internal medicine

  • for about 14 years now.

  • I've always had a drive to make a difference in the world

  • and I feel like medicine

  • and healthcare is just a very direct way to make an impact.

  • Also, really interested in HIV and AIDS,

  • which is part of internal medicine.

  • So I ended up spending some time working

  • with Doctors Without Borders.

  • (air whooshing)

  • - Okay.

  • For our first challenge.

  • - I'm gonna get a list of conditions.

  • - And I'm going to identify which are the real ones.

  • - And which one is fake.

  • - All right, so we've got groat's disease,

  • facial blindness, sleeping beauty syndrome,

  • uromysitisis poisoning, electrogonnorhea,

  • alien hand syndrome and torsonic polarity syndrome.

  • - Groat's disease.

  • I'm a huge fan of Curb Your Enthusiasm.

  • That is a made-up disease

  • (bell dings)

  • by Larry David.

  • Although, maybe it's something that he has.

  • - I've definitely heard of this one,

  • but it's from TV.

  • (bell dings)

  • From Curb Your Enthusiasm.

  • So, next question.

  • - Facial blindness.

  • This is something that I don't usually deal with

  • in pediatrics,

  • but I feel like it's definitely real.

  • (bell dings)

  • There's a lot of different facial conditions.

  • So, I'm leaning a little more towards real.

  • - Sleeping beauty syndrome,

  • I'm pretty sure is an actual syndrome or disease.

  • (bell dings)

  • I believe it's when somebody is in a catatonic

  • or in a comatose state.

  • Not too sure.

  • It kind of reminds me of...

  • What's that one where people fall asleep?

  • Oh, narcolepsy.

  • I'm gonna say sleeping beauty syndrome is real.

  • - Uromysitisis poisoning

  • (bell dings)

  • is not a real disease.

  • It sounds like it could have something

  • to do with the urinary tract,

  • but it doesn't.

  • - Electrogonnorhea.

  • I will tell you that is not real.

  • (bell dings)

  • It's actually from a show that I love called Futurama.

  • Please don't ever diagnose yourself with this.

  • - Alien hand syndrome.

  • This one is definitely real.

  • (bell dings)

  • I've have some patients with this.

  • It has something to do with the hand

  • and just the way the hand functions.

  • - If I remember correctly,

  • it means that you don't realize that the hand is your own.

  • So, this clearly has to do with something

  • with your brain's ability to perceive your environment.

  • I believe if you do have alien hand syndrome

  • you're even at risk of possibly just cutting your arm off

  • or getting rid of it

  • because you don't think it belongs on your body.

  • - Torsonic polarity (laughs) syndrome.

  • I'm gonna say that those are real words

  • that have been used in the medical field.

  • I can't tell you that I've heard of it in that order.

  • It sounds legit.

  • It sounds like a real disorder,

  • but I don't know.

  • (buzzer buzzes)

  • Even doctors learn aren't sure sometimes.

  • Sometimes we have to look things up and Google them.

  • Sometimes we don't know all the answers.

  • You know, we're here to work together with you.

  • (air whooshing)

  • - In the second challenge

  • we're gonna play a little game of Operation.

  • - So I'm gonna see how many pieces I can get out.

  • - Before I hit the buzzer.

  • - Digging way back into my surgery rotation.

  • I am not a surgeon,

  • but let's see how this goes.

  • - Okay.

  • I'm gonna try the easy ones first.

  • So the butterfly in the stomach.

  • But this is making me really nervous.

  • (grunting)

  • Okay, there's one butterfly.

  • - I'm gonna be doing the water on the knee.

  • Which I'm still not sure is a a real syndrome.

  • Oh, god.

  • Water in the knee's out.

  • - All right, let's try the spare ribs.

  • No.

  • Butterfly, let's try the butterfly.

  • - How about the bread basket?

  • Boy.

  • Here we go.

  • Okay, there's number two.

  • There's no way I'm gonna be able to get some of these.

  • Some of these just look impossible,

  • but I'm gonna try.

  • - We will not do the ankle connected to the knee bone.

  • That's a really long description for a children's game.

  • - All right, going for number two now.

  • The funny bone.

  • Sounds like a comedy club.

  • All right, success.

  • - Let's try the writers cramp.

  • I'm so scared.

  • - I'm gonna do the brain freeze one,

  • which is supposed to be pretty easy.

  • There you go.

  • - I'll go for the wishbone.

  • (game buzzes)

  • Yikes.

  • I got two and a half.

  • - Number three.

  • Let's get rid of this guy's broken heart.

  • (game buzzes)

  • Think I lost on the broken heart challenge there.

  • This is actually a lot harder than I remember.

  • That's probably why I'm not a surgeon

  • and also why you don't have three cups of espresso

  • before you come on this show.

  • - Ha ha.

  • Ha ha.

  • (laughs)

  • Ready?

  • (game buzzes)

  • Oh god!

  • (laughs)

  • and that's also why I'm not a surgeon.

  • I can talk to a baby.

  • That's what I can do.

  • (laughs)

  • - I also don't think it's fair

  • because I'm towards the end of my interment fasting period.

  • So I'm a little bit hungry and shaky right now.

  • Okay.

  • That's another one.

  • The wrenched ankle does not look easy.

  • - [Producer] How does this compare to regular surgery?

  • - It's exactly the same as regular surgery.

  • I wish we did this during training.

  • I'm gonna try my left hand on this one.

  • (game buzzes)

  • I buzzed it.

  • That was pretty terrible.

  • That was four.

  • I think it's just 'cause I tried to go for the hard one.

  • (air whooshing)

  • - So last and final round.

  • - I'm gonna have to reach way back into med school

  • into my anatomy and physiology classes

  • and try to remember some.

  • - Anatomical terms.

  • - I got to point to where they are on the body.

  • - Okay.

  • Anatomical snuffbox it is right here.

  • It's a little crease here in your hand.

  • - Kind of in between the base of your thumb

  • and your index finger.

  • - The philtrum is gonna be right here.

  • This little mountain ridge thing.

  • In between your lips.

  • That's what it is.

  • - There's actually a really interesting story

  • about the philtrum that everybody has an angel in the womb

  • with them and when they're born then the angel says,

  • shh and pushes and it's this little crevasse

  • in the lips right there.

  • Do I really believe that?

  • Maybe not, but it's a cute story.

  • But this is the philtrum right here.

  • - I just Botoxed someones glabella today.

  • The glabella is the area right in between the eyebrows.

  • It's the muscles.

  • I wonder if my Botox is too strong?

  • But it when you move your eyebrows together

  • 'cause you're looking angry

  • and stern and you see the two muscles

  • that kind of meet together

  • and those are the glabella muscles.

  • - Tragus is the area in the ear

  • where all high schoolers really want to get their ears

  • pierced to really get into their emo stages.

  • I actually want to get it pierced soon,

  • but I'm a little scared of how much it's gonna hurt.

  • But this is your tragus.

  • - Arrector pili, it's just a fancy word

  • for saying goosebumps.

  • - They're the tiny, tiny little muscles

  • that are around your hair as well as,

  • yeah mostly just around your hair follicles.

  • So when you get goosebumps

  • and your hair stands up,

  • those are the muscles that control it.

  • - Now that you've seen me do all three challenges.

  • - I'm pretty sure you know that I am the doctor.

  • - It should be pretty obvious that I am the doctor.

  • - So I think it's pretty clear that I am the real doctor.

  • (dramatic music)

  • (clock ticking)

  • - Oh, boy.

  • Did you guys believe me?

  • I hope not.

  • (buzzer buzzes)

  • 'cause that would make you really unhealthy right now.

  • I am not Dr. Becca Beberaggi.

  • I am comedian Dr. Becca Beberaggi.

  • And honestly people,

  • if I was your doctor,

  • I'd be concerned for you

  • and also do your research on Zocdoc.

  • - Okay, so did I fool you guys?