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  • Hello I'm Emma from mmmEnglish!

  • This video is perfect for intermediate to advanced

  • English learners who want to improve their skills

  • in English conversations.

  • So I'm gonna share the exact phrases and expressions

  • that you need to do things in English conversations

  • like when you want to interrupt someone

  • or you want to change the topic.

  • Maybe when you need to end a conversation

  • and lots of others as well.

  • In fact, I'm sharing fifty useful phrases that will help you

  • in English conversations, all useful expressions

  • that you need to improve your speaking skills

  • and to help you maintain conversations for longer.

  • So I hope you're ready. Let's get into it!

  • Now a lot can happen during a conversation.

  • Talking about the topic is one important part

  • but to speak fluently and to speak with ease,

  • you need to have a range of conversation tools

  • up your sleeve because there are lots

  • of other shifts and changes that happen

  • during a conversation

  • depending on who you're talking to,

  • what's going on around you and

  • whether or not you're interested or not.

  • Right now we're going to focus on the tools

  • that you need to move around

  • in your conversations easily and naturally.

  • Alright and if you make it through to the very end of this

  • video, I'm gonna share some advanced expressions

  • to help you talk about controversial topics

  • to help you express your ideas when you know

  • that not everyone's gonna agree with you

  • right and you want to prepare them for that.

  • Now if that sounds a little too intense for you

  • and maybe you want to start by focusing on

  • simpler conversation strategies about

  • just starting a conversation with someone,

  • then I recommend that you first watch

  • this lesson up here.

  • So conversations are always two ways, right?

  • That's what makes a conversation.

  • So as you give your opinion or you share something,

  • it's always nice to invite the other person's opinion right?

  • And this is a really important strategy to help you

  • extend your conversations,

  • asking for other people's opinions.

  • So what do you say when you're asking for other

  • people's opinions?

  • Well quite simply, you could ask "Do you agree?"

  • Very basic. It's quite closed that question, so what about

  • if you opened up that question

  • to get a more interesting answer?

  • What do you think about that?

  • What's your opinion?

  • Or how do you feel about it?

  • If you want to make it a little more polite, you might say.

  • I'd like to hear your thoughts on that.

  • Or I'm interested to hear your opinion about this.

  • And more formally,

  • maybe if you were at a meeting at work,

  • you know you might ask

  • "Would you like to add anything?"

  • And this is just, you know, a nice sort of

  • polite way of inviting other people into the conversation

  • to share their opinion.

  • So what about what to say when you want to interrupt?

  • When someone else is talking

  • and you want to interrupt them,

  • well there are definitely ways to do it rudely

  • but of course, there are many ways to do it

  • politely as well. Sometimes you have to

  • interrupt in conversations.

  • So of course, you could say "Sorry"

  • "Excuse me" is a little more polite

  • and then you can actually lead straight on

  • with your different idea or your opinion there.

  • Sorry I thought our meeting was on Thursday next week

  • not Wednesday.

  • You know it's just a little brief interjection

  • to help you share a different opinion

  • or a different thought.

  • Now you can informally interrupt someone to

  • add an idea to a conversation by saying

  • "Do you mind if I add to that?" or

  • "Can I jump in here?"

  • and that literally means can I jump into the conversation

  • right now at this point. I've got something to share.

  • I want to say it.

  • Now there are some more polite ways to express this

  • as well. You might say

  • "Sorry to interrupt but I've got something to say"

  • Or "Sorry for interrupting"

  • Now there's not a lot of difference between those two.

  • I would just say that

  • "Sorry to interrupt"

  • is probably used more when you're speaking directly

  • to the person that you're interrupting

  • and then maybe if you're stepping into a room full of

  • people talking, a meeting room or something like that,

  • then you might say

  • "Sorry for interrupting,

  • I just needed to share something with you."

  • Now to go even more formal than that, perhaps if you're

  • working in a hotel and you need to interrupt a customer,

  • you might say

  • "Sorry, may I interrupt you for just a moment?"

  • Or "If I may interrupt you for a minute,

  • I'd like to share something with you"

  • Oh actually, if you don't mind me interrupting

  • for a moment, I'd love to tell you a little bit about

  • The Ladies' Project.

  • If you're a woman wanting to develop the confident

  • English speaking version of yourself

  • that's just as expressive, as intelligent and

  • interesting as you are in your own language,

  • then you should definitely check out The Ladies' Project.

  • It's a lively online community

  • that helps women around the world

  • to meet and practise speaking English together.

  • We have real conversations about the things in life

  • that are most important. We can help you to quickly

  • find reliable speaking partners, offer you guidance

  • from native teachers, build your conversation skills

  • and overcome your fears and your frustrations

  • about speaking English fluently.

  • So if you want to keep improving your English

  • conversation skills or maybe you're looking for a way to

  • maintain the skills that you've already developed,

  • then I hope you'll come and check it out.

  • We're accepting new members right now but only

  • for another week.

  • So to find out more

  • click the link in the description below.

  • Okay. Where was I?

  • That was a good example of what to say

  • when you've gone off topic.

  • If you go off topic, it means that you started

  • talking about something, so for example apples,

  • but while you were talking you started

  • to talk about something else, you know, maybe you got

  • distracted or you got excited and went off

  • telling a different story.

  • Or even the other person that you're talking to

  • has gone off topic and you're thinking

  • "How on earth did we end up talking about potatoes?"

  • You've got to get your conversation back on track right?

  • And it really is just that simple shift in the conversation.

  • So here's how to do it.

  • So anyway, getting back to my story..

  • As I was saying...

  • Where was I?

  • Ah yes...

  • You can also combine

  • some of these expressions together.

  • So anyway, where were we?

  • Ah yes... You were talking about apples!

  • What to say when you think you understood

  • but you need to double-check.

  • These are really important expressions to learn,

  • to help you as you're listening

  • so that you can feel more confident about your answers,

  • you know, when you're answering someone else's

  • question, this is just a little check

  • to make sure you're answering it accurately.

  • So if you didn't quite hear perfectly, you could say

  • "So what you're asking is..."

  • and then repeat back what you heard.

  • So, what you want to know is...

  • and then repeat.

  • Do you mean?

  • And then paraphrase what you heard

  • or you could say

  • "In other words, what you're saying is..."

  • and this is a really natural part of conversation.