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  • Hello, everyone.

  • Welcome to this English course on adverbs.

  • And in this video I'm gonna focus on Adverbs of Time.

  • Now adverbs of time tell us 'when' an action happens,

  • and also 'how long' and 'how often'.

  • Now these adverbs are extremely common in English,

  • so you really need to know about them.

  • So let's start learning together.

  • Let's now take a look at a few example sentences telling us 'when' something happened.

  • 'She ate ice cream yesterday.'

  • The adverb in this sentence ishave you noticed?

  • 'yesterday' of course.

  • And it's an adverb of time.

  • When did you eat ice cream? 'yesterday'

  • I see you now.

  • Now where is the adverb in this sentence?

  • Of course the adverb is 'now'.

  • Again it's an adverb of time.

  • When do I see you?

  • 'now' 'I tell him daily.'

  • The adverb is 'daily'.

  • Again adverb of time.

  • 'We met last year.'

  • Can you see the adverb?

  • Of course the adverb in this case is 'last year'.

  • Again notion of time.

  • When did we meet? 'last year'

  • And finally, 'He will call you later'.

  • The adverb in this sentence is also an adverb of time.

  • It is 'later'.

  • So these are all adverbs of time And as you can see in those examples,

  • usually adverbs of time are at the end of the sentence.

  • Let's do a bit of pronunciation practice.

  • Repeat after me, please.

  • 'She ate ice cream yesterday.'

  • 'I see you now.'

  • 'I tell him daily.'

  • 'We met last year.'

  • 'He will call you later.'

  • Good guys.

  • Let's move on.

  • Let's now move on to example sentences showing us how long something happened.

  • These adverbs are also usually placed at the end of the sentence.

  • But let's have a look.

  • 'She stayed home all day.'

  • Which part of this sentence is an adverb?

  • Can you see it?

  • Of course, 'all day'.

  • And it tells us how long she stayed home.

  • 'I studied in Canada for a year now.'

  • In this sentence, 'for a year' tells us how long I studied in Canada.

  • 'He has taught English since 1990.'

  • How long has he taught English?

  • Since 1990.

  • 'I studied English for four hours.'

  • Which pond is the adverb?

  • 'For four hours' 'How long did I study English?'

  • 'for four hours' And finally, 'We have lived in New Zealand

  • since 2005.'

  • The adverb is of course 'since 2005'.

  • As you can see adverbs are not necessarily just one word.

  • 'since 2005' - two words.

  • 'for four hours' - three words.

  • Okay, so they're not just one word sometimes they're more than one.

  • Now let's do a bit of pronunciation practice.

  • Repeat after me.

  • 'She stayed home all day.'

  • 'I studied in Canada for a year.'

  • 'He has taught English since 1990.'

  • 'I studied English for four hours.'

  • 'We have lived in New Zealand since 2005.'

  • Good guys.

  • Let's move on.

  • Adverbs telling us how often express the frequency of an action.

  • They're usually placed before the main verb, but after the auxiliary verb,

  • such as B may have or must.

  • The only exception is if the main verb is the verb to be.

  • In which case the adverb goes after the main verb.

  • Let's have a look at a few example sentences.

  • 'I often eat pizza.'

  • Can you spot the adverb?

  • It's 'often'.

  • And as you can see, it is placed before the main verb which is 'eat'.

  • So 'I often eat'.

  • The second example, 'He has never drunk Cola.'

  • In this case, we have an auxiliary verb.

  • The auxiliary verb 'have' and the main verb is 'drunk'.

  • So the adverb is placed between the auxiliary verb and the main verb.

  • 'He has never drunk.'

  • 'You must always brush your teeth.'

  • Same applies.

  • We have an auxiliary verb 'must'.

  • Okay.

  • And we have the main verb 'brush', so the adverb goes after the axillary verb,

  • but before the main verb.

  • 'You must always brush.'

  • 'I am seldom late'.

  • So the main verb is the verb 'to be'.

  • Be careful.

  • So in this case the adverb goes after the main verb.

  • 'I am seldom late'.

  • And finally, 'He rarely lies.'

  • The main verb is 'lies'.

  • So the adverb goes before the main verb.

  • 'He rarely lies'.

  • Okay.

  • Let's do a bit of pronunciation practice.

  • Now repeat after me.

  • 'I often eat pizza.'

  • 'He has never drunk Cola.'

  • 'You must always brush your teeth.'

  • 'I am seldom late.'

  • 'He rarely lies.'

  • Great job guys.

  • Let's move on.

  • Some adverbs expressing 'how often' express the exact number of times that an action happened

  • They're called definite 'adverbs of frequency'.

  • And in this case, they're usually placed at the end of the sentence.

  • Let's have a look at a few examples.

  • 'I visit my dentist yearly.'

  • The adverb is 'yearly'.

  • Okay.

  • 'Once a year' and it expresses the exact number of times that I visit my dentist.

  • It's a definite adverb of frequency, so it's placed at the end of the sentence.

  • Other example, 'He goes to the gym once a week.'

  • Again we have a definite adverb of frequency which is 'once a week'.

  • 'I work five days a week.'

  • Same thing.

  • We have a definite adverb of frequency which is 'five days a week'

  • so it's placed at the end of the sentence.

  • And finally, 'I saw the movie five times.'

  • Again 'five times' expresses the exact number of times that I saw the movie.

  • Let's do a bit of pronunciation practice.

  • Repeat after me.

  • 'I visit my dentist yearly.'

  • 'He goes to the gym once a week.'

  • 'I work five days a week.'

  • 'I saw the movie five times.'

  • Good.

  • Moving on now.

  • If you want to use more than one adverb of time in a sentence,

  • you should put them in the following order: First, 'how long?'.

  • Second, 'how often?'.

  • And finally, 'when?'.

  • Let's take a look at a very good example sentence.

  • 'He taught at the school for ten days every month last year.'

  • Now as you can see, first, we're told 'how long' - for ten days.

  • Then, we're told 'how often' - every month.

  • And finally, were told 'when' exactly - last year.

  • This is a very good sentence using the different kinds of adverbs of time in the right order,

  • so I hope you can do the same let's practice pronunciation together.

  • Now repeat after me.

  • 'He taught at the school for 10 days every month last year.'

  • Good job, guys.

  • Let's now practice together okay guys.

  • Let's do a bit of extra practice.

  • I have four example sentences for you to spot adverbs of time,

  • so let's get started.

  • 'He has been to Canada three times.'

  • Can you spot the adverb?

  • Of course the adverb is the adverb frequency 'three times'.

  • Okay.

  • How often has he been to Canada three times.

  • The second example is, 'Generally I don't like to eat spicy food.'

  • The adverb is 'generally'.

  • And remember I told you some adverbs of frequency work well at the beginning of a sentence if

  • you want to emphasize the frequency, so 'generally' is one of them.

  • Another example would be 'sometimes'.

  • Next example.

  • 'He will clean his room regularly from now on.'

  • Now be careful.

  • In this case, we have two adverbs.

  • The first one 'regularly'.

  • The second one 'from now on'.

  • Keeping the order, 'regularly' is 'how often?'

  • followed by 'when?' – 'from now on'.

  • And finally, 'I've been going to church for four days

  • every month since 1996.'

  • Three adverbs in this case.

  • 'how long?' – 'for four days' 'how often?'

  • - 'every month' 'when?' – 'since 1996'

  • Let's practice pronunciation now.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'He's been to Canada three times.'

  • 'Generally, I don't like to eat spicy food.'

  • 'He will clean his room regularly from now on.'

  • 'I've been going to church for four days every month since 1996.'

  • Great job.

  • Moving on.

  • Okay guys.

  • You now know a lot more about adverbs of time.

  • Remember these adverbs are extremely common in English,

  • so it's very important for you to learn about them.

  • They will improve your English skills very quickly.

  • Okay now there are obviously other types of adverbs

  • - adverbs of place of manner and of degree And I will focus on these in my next videos,

  • so check them out.

  • Thank you for watching my video and see you next time.

  • Thank you very much guys for watching my video.

  • I hope you liked it, and if you did, please show me your support.

  • Click like, subscribe to the channel, put your comments below if you have some,

  • and share it with all your friends.

Hello, everyone.

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A2 adverb main verb sentence frequency auxiliary verb main

Adverbs of Time | Learn Basic English Grammar

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    Summer posted on 2020/05/09
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