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  • - Hey, everyone!

  • Welcome to our webinar.

  • My name is Lauren Quan, and I'm on the Khan Academy team.

  • Today, I am joined by my coworker, Dan Tieu,

  • and our special guest, Conor Corey.

  • Conor is an expert teacher, a parent,

  • and a Khan Academy ambassador,

  • which means he's a Khan Academy power user.

  • He's gonna be sharing his tips and advice

  • on student motivation.

  • But before we get started,

  • I wanted to thank our sponsors,

  • Bank of America, AT&T, Google.org, Novartis, and Fastly

  • for their support of this webinar

  • and our other remote learning resources.

  • And a few other notes for you to know.

  • This webinar will be recorded and sent to you via email

  • a few hours after the session ends,

  • and if you have questions at any point during the webinar,

  • feel free to enter them in the question box.

  • And we have staff available to answer your questions.

  • We're also gonna save time at the end

  • for live Q and A with Conor.

  • And lastly, you might be wondering

  • about the age range for this webinar.

  • So Conor will be sharing tips that can be useful

  • for parents of kids of all ages.

  • So with that, let's get started.

  • I'm thrilled to have Conor here to share his advice.

  • Conor, can you share a little bit about yourself

  • and your background?

  • - Hi, Lauren.

  • Thanks for having me, everybody.

  • Yes, I've now been a math educator mostly teaching

  • middle school math and fifth grade math for--

  • This is my 17th year, and by far this is the toughest year

  • for myself and my students.

  • Right now, I also have four children of my own

  • and it is chaos for myself to teach

  • and try to keep up with--

  • Three of them are in school, one is in preschool,

  • but to keep up with all of their assignments

  • and to keep up to make sure they're handing things in

  • and to fully change the role

  • from not only my students' teacher to my own children,

  • it's been very difficult.

  • And I look forward to the opportunity.

  • Hopefully, I can help and just maybe some of the things

  • that I'm doing around here,

  • but I may not have all the answers.

  • I can kinda just tell you from my own experience

  • with teaching and being a parent at the same time,

  • that hopefully you can see both sides of the spectrum.

  • - Fantastic.

  • And yeah, Conor as you mentioned, a lot of parents

  • are finding themselves stepping into the role of teachers

  • for the first time, and we're hearing so many questions

  • from parents about ways to motivate their kids.

  • So what advice would you give to parents who are wondering,

  • "How do I motivate my kids to be interested in learning?"

  • - It's a great question and it's a difficult question.

  • There's not really one answer

  • that's going to motivate children across the board.

  • Especially for even myself, I'm gonna tell you

  • that all of my kids are eating ring pops upstairs

  • just to avoid me for a half hour of coming down here

  • so I can do this,

  • and many parents are in that same situation.

  • But to motivate students and your own children,

  • I've always kinda tied it to some sort of incentive.

  • And it's never really a financial incentive.

  • It's always just your time or something

  • that they really are interested in,

  • and it does not have to be academic related.

  • It could be something as simple as,

  • you finish all your schoolwork today,

  • then you get to pick tonight's movie.

  • Or my daughter is, I do construction

  • in the summertime usually

  • and my daughter's very interested in power tools,

  • when she sees me building.

  • So I'm teaching her how to use those

  • when she finishes her stuff.

  • I know my wife, who has probably never played a video game

  • in her life, but my son and I will play Madden.

  • He's in third grade and we will play all the time

  • because I'm a giant child.

  • But my wife has started to play against him,

  • and he doesn't care if I play anymore.

  • He wants to play her because it's so different for him

  • to see her in that type of environment,

  • taking interest in what he's interested in,

  • and that has been motivating for him.

  • So I think if you just try to find something

  • your child is interested in,

  • that you usually would not participate in

  • or you kinda let them participate with their friends.

  • You know, they're not really around their friends anymore,

  • so they need somebody that wants

  • to just reinforce their interests,

  • and I think that's a big motivator,

  • and you can kinda tie that to their academics.

  • - Mhmm, I love those creative ideas

  • that you've shared there.

  • Another question that we're hearing a lot is,

  • how do I keep my kids focused and engaged in learning?

  • - Focus and engaged, it's kind of one of the hardest parts.

  • Parents have just been given an unrealistic expectation

  • to automatically become their teacher.

  • To automatically have mastered grade level content

  • in not one subject, but four or five or six subjects.

  • I know for myself as a teacher,

  • I am a master of middle school math,

  • but if you give me an eighth grade biology test,

  • I am not gonna do well. (laughs)

  • So, when you're just pushing all the sudden

  • all of this on parents, they're very stressed out.

  • And their children fully understand

  • that they don't get the concepts or the content as much.

  • My suggestion for this is to try

  • to learn something with them.

  • For instance with Khan Academy, I always tell parents,

  • I did kind of like an experiment a few years ago,

  • where I asked parents to master their child's

  • fifth or fourth, their child's content on Khan Academy,

  • so their child's grade level.

  • And what I found from that was amazing.

  • Most parents have bought out of math after third grade.

  • It becomes, "Oh my god,

  • "I don't know how they're teaching you this.

  • "I don't know this new style of math."

  • But the linear approach that Khan Academy

  • gives to learn anything

  • was fantastic for them to see that,

  • okay this is how they're teaching math.

  • It's just something, if you try fourth grade math

  • and your child may be in seventh or eighth grade,

  • and they're doing seventh or eighth grade,

  • you can kinda do it alongside them

  • for 15 minutes a day, 10 minutes a day.

  • That has been a huge help with understanding

  • where to find relevant content

  • when your child has any misunderstanding

  • because it doesn't have to be in math.

  • It could be in science, chemistry, in history, in SAT prep,

  • all of that is available.

  • But if you're looking for a video to help your child,

  • you may go through Google

  • and you'll have 30 different websites

  • and you start to find one you don't know

  • how relevant or accurate it is,

  • and you're spending so much time trying to find one thing.

  • If you work through something like Khan Academy

  • on a fourth grade level,

  • you'd be surprised how the whole spectrum of education

  • will open up and the understanding will open up

  • of how to find content to help your child.

  • And they're gonna be engaged

  • because they're doing it with you,

  • and they're gonna laugh at you when you get things wrong

  • because you will. (laughs)

  • You'd be surprised how difficult third

  • or fourth grade math can be. (laughs)

  • - Yeah, for sure.

  • - But if they can learn with them is probably the best way.

  • - Yeah, and speaking of.

  • I'm sure it's been awhile for parents

  • for third or fourth grade math.

  • And so if kids, for example, if they get frustrated,

  • do you have any tips for keeping kids engaged

  • if they get frustrated or if they get things wrong?

  • - Yeah, and right now, most children are frustrated.

  • They're used to having an expert in that content area