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  • Welcome to the third and final part of the memorization and Anki video series.

  • If you haven't already, be sure to first watch parts one and two.

  • Link in the description below.

  • I hope this series proves helpful – I put a lot of time and effort into this video series

  • because Anki is so often underutilized and misunderstood.

  • Now I'm confident that if you learn to use Anki properly, medical school will be much much

  • easier for you.

  • Dr. Jubbal, MedSchoolInsiders.com.

  • Number 7, Mnemonic Techniques. In a previous video,

  • I went over the importance of various mnemonic devices and the method of loci.

  • Combining these mnemonic devices with spaced repetition in the form of Anki flashcards

  • is one of the best ways to supercharge your memorization abilities.

  • I personally used the tagstoryormnemonicon my Anki cards and would craft stories or

  • mnemonic devices underneath the answer on the back side of the card.

  • Unfortunately, I can't share too many of mine as most are rather risqué.

  • Remember, the more vulgar, obscene, or ridiculous, the better, as long as it makes sense to you.

  • When crafting your own mnemonic devices, there are two additional considerations to keep

  • in mind.

  • First, the Self-Reference Effect means you are more likely to remember pieces of information

  • that relate to you, so think of personal and relatable examples.

  • Second, take advantage of strong emotional states to help make the information be more sticky.

  • This ties back in with making more vulgar, obscene, and ridiculous memory devices.

  • Number 8, Avoid Sets and Enumerations. Sets are collections of objects.

  • For example, what are all the branches of the external carotid artery?

  • Now just listing them without direction is actually quite challenging.

  • So instead, convert this to an ordered list, which is called an enumeration.

  • By reciting the branches in order from proximal to distal, you're much more likely to remember

  • the information.

  • So why is that?

  • Whenever you complete a repetition of the information you want to learn, it's important

  • to reinforce it in the same way each time.

  • Enumerations are great for this because they are ordered, forcing you to recite the information in the

  • same order each and every time, therefore you are reinforcing the same learning pathway.

  • However, enumerations are are not simple and should not be used too frequently.

  • If you're having difficulty during each repetition of an enumeration, you can also use

  • overlapping cloze deletions.

  • For example, have the first three branches. So that's the superior thyroid artery, the ascending pharyngeal

  • artery, and lingual artery as one cloze deletion, and then the next one you can have some overlap, so lingual artery, facial artery,

  • and occipital artery, and so on and so forth.

  • Number 9, Be Concise. Brevity is your best friend.

  • When you're reviewing hundreds of cards per day, a superfluous word here or there

  • will quickly add up.

  • For that reason, it's key that you optimize wording.

  • Focus on the exact information you need.

  • The words before and after that information are going to be less important.

  • So get rid of it.

  • Number 10,| Redundancy - Attack the Information From Different Angles

  • Most of us practice the information we need to learn in only one direction.

  • Come test time, that can lead to problems.

  • For this reason, I recommend you practice redundancy with your Anki cards.

  • Learn to practice the information from more than just one direction.

  • Let's go back to the branches of the external carotid artery.

  • Rather than just reciting the branches in order, you can test yourself on a single artery

  • and trace the path from the heart.

  • For example, you could say trace the path of the L facial artery.

  • So you'd go from ascending aortacommon carotidexternal carotidfacial artery

  • Number 11, provide sources for your cards.

  • This isn't a hard rule, but this proved useful to me on many occasions in medical

  • school.

  • Certain texts may contradict other texts, and there are times when you need to figure

  • out what is the truth.

  • Listing the source from where you got the card will make the process much simpler when

  • you inevitably face this issue.

  • Remember, this is just for your own purposes so you know where you got the information

  • in case you need to reference it again.

  • You don't worry about doing MLA bibliography format or anything like that.

  • Number 12, Don't Be Afraid to Edit or Delete your cards. As you prepare for any large exam, your Anki

  • deck should be constantly evolving.

  • And over time, your Anki card creation skills will improve.

  • My earliest cards were far too complicated, and the process of developing my card creation

  • skill was gradual.

  • So don't be afraid to go back and edit, improve, or even delete your earlier cards as needed.

  • And number 13, Set a Daily Threshold for New Cards. You will have days where you create lots of

  • cards, and other days where you don't create any at all.

  • To maintain a more even learning schedule and review burden, I recommend setting a daily

  • threshold for new cards.

  • I usually left my review card number uncapped to let Anki's algorithm work its magic,

  • and therefore I only capped the new card limit.

  • Lots of students ask me how many new cards they should be doing per day and how many

  • cards they should be reviewing.

  • There are too many factors and it's therefore not possible to give a range that's suitable

  • for everyone.

  • My recommendation is to stay flexible.

  • There were times, such as when I was ramping up for my sub-internships, where I was cranking

  • through up to 100 new cards per day.

  • However, once I felt comfortable with my knowledge and had a large review queue, I reduced the

  • new card limit to 25-50 per day, depending on how busy my rotation was.

  • Play around with the limits and figure out what works best for you.

  • Creating Anki cards and optimizing your learning in medical school is no easy task.

  • It took me years of experimentation and tweaking to finally get consistent and excellent results

  • that allowed me to match into a hyper competitive surgical subspecialty.

  • If you are not getting the results you want in university or medical school, our tutors

  • at MedSchoolInsiders.com can help.

  • Whether it's the MCAT, USMLE Step 1, or any other pre-med or medical school test,

  • we've got your back.

  • Our tutors scored in the top percentiles and they can help you do the same.

  • If you regularly watch our YouTube videos, chances are you know how heavily we emphasize

  • the importance of systems in generating desirable results.

  • And our tutoring is no different.

  • We've painstakingly taken months crafting the systems in place to provide the best quality

  • tutoring.

  • We examine your test taking strategies, study methods, road blocks and sticking points,

  • and customize a tailored plan to optimize your performance on test day.

  • Visit MedSchoolInsiders.com to learn more.

  • Alright guys, so this was the third and final part to the memorization and Anki video series.

  • Thank you for making it all the way through to the end!

  • If you enjoyed this video series, let me know when a thumbs up!

  • And I know Anki is a beast of a program, so if you have any questions, leave a comment down below

  • and I'll do my best to answer them.

  • Anytime a new video is posted, I hang out in the comments for the first hour. So if you want to chat, make sure you're subscribed

  • and you have that notification bell enabled.

  • Much love to you all, and I will see you guys in that next one.

Welcome to the third and final part of the memorization and Anki video series.

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B2 artery anki mnemonic information video series card

13 Steps to Better ANKI Flashcards | Part 2/2

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    Summer posted on 2020/04/28
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