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  • Hey guys! Welcome to Oita in Japan. I'm Norm and this is Shiori!

  • I am kind of taking over from Emma today hosting this videoactually just as Emma left,

  • I arrived and so yeah! We have been here... how many days now?

  • This is day 5...?

  • I think the first day was the busiest. What did we do on the first day?

  • We went to Beppu. We did so many things. We woke up so early!

  • I think our day kicked off at something like 7 o'clock in the morning and then, what was the first thing we did that day?

  • That was the suna-yu!

  • Oh my goodness! Let's give a little bit of a description of what the suna-yu was. Do you want to explain it?

  • The aunties dig a hole in the sand and then you will just lie there and relax for 15 minutes.

  • Yeah, but they cover you with sand right?

  • Yup, with the sand. And then you only have your head out of the sand so you look so... what is it.. suspicious.

  • I'm not sure this description is correct or not but...

  • Suspicious is a perfect Shiori description. It's absolutely perfect.

  • But you have a nice little umbrella to prevent you from the brightness of the sun.

  • It was really bright actually! Yeah! It was more pressure than I expected.

  • Yeah, yeah! It's quite heavy. What did you think about the experience?

  • At first, I thought it was the most relaxing thing ever because

  • it's like a weighted blanket, so you're like, "oh this is really comfortable!" but

  • you can't move your arms or your legs and then you start to itch. I had one piece of

  • like sweat running down and then going like, "Oh I can't itch it, I can't itch it!"

  • Right! But you actually put your thumbs up.

  • Yeah, yeah! Right through the sand.

  • Right! But suna-yu is one short-time activity because you can only do 15 minutes at one go.

  • So if you only have a short amount of time but you want to relax, you want to sweat and refresh a bit,

  • I think this is a really good way to experience the onsen culture in Japan.

  • And it's really famous here in Beppu too, right?

  • Like the day before, I was hanging out with another TC member, Dogen and that

  • was the first thing he suggested: "Why don't we go to the sand baths?".

  • We didn't go but yes, I'm glad I got to go. What did we do after that?

  • After that, we went through the very very beautiful mountain!

  • I think we were not sure where we were because-

  • It doesn't look like Japan at all!

  • It's one of the best views to enjoy!

  • But maybe for you as a creator, it's very fun to be there to shoot, right?

  • It was fun to be there and it was like high pressure because I was like, "do we have five minutes?" , "do we have 20 minutes?"

  • "How many pictures can I get?", "How many videos can I get?". I really liked it! That was nice.

  • We moved on pretty quickly from there and went to...

  • I forgot!

  • Rakuten-chi! Yes, yes, yes, sorry! The mountain-top theme park!

  • You've been living in Asakusa for a while so you can compare Hanayashiki and Rakuten-chi, I guess because Rakuten-chi is 90 years old!

  • Yeah and Hanayashiki is like the oldest theme park in Japan, if you

  • don't know what it is, but I think the fact that you get to take the cable car

  • and the fact that Rakuten-chi is not crowdedfor me, Rakuten-chi wins.

  • Because Hanayashiki is great. It's one of those places where, from the outside it

  • looks this big and then when you go inside, it's this big!

  • I've always liked that but it's crowded.

  • I hated lining up for rides as a kid but here, you actually can be like a kid and enjoy the nice little rides as well.

  • I like the roller coaster the most! It was so fun.

  • This is actually the first place I've been to in Japan where people would

  • get off the ride and line back up because of the line, right? That's how NOT crowded it was.

  • Yeah, I think I can try most of the rides because I'm only 150cm so maybe I can try more rides. He was joking around so much and making so many small jokes.

  • Oh! The ice-cream there was also really nice.

  • And after Rakuten-chi, we drove a bit and went to the Jigoku-dani (Hell Night).

  • Yes! The Beppu Hells! Ah that was nice!

  • You actually went there with Dogen, right? The day before.

  • Dogen showed me around the area

  • and he knew so much about it so he took me to all the likethe little back

  • streets where the steam is coming up from the street and that's why, like at

  • night, that river that I took you guys to,

  • Dogen showed that to me and we actually had food-steamed, hot-spring steamed food, yeah.

  • It was good!

  • What did you think of it?

  • I don't know why but I feel like all the vegetables were softer than usual and it was so nice.

  • So you know how like the onsen, sulfur steam kind of smells like eggs, right? So,

  • to me like the egg tasted extra eggy. Does that make sense? That the egg tasted extra eggy? The egg was very pungent!

  • And because the egg was a different color, right?

  • Yeah, yeah! So it was a really dark colored egg.

  • It was a nice day one. That was pretty much what we did, and the next day, we went to Yufu City! How was that?

  • I personally loved the drive into it... so much! And the city itself... I was

  • surprised because Beppu was so quiet but Yufu is so popular!

  • You're right– I feel like it had the vibes of Asakusa or Kyototouristy areas but there was so much

  • energy because the town itself is so beautiful so we kept walking

  • around and then checking the small souvenir shops are very fun. The museum! The Showa Era museum!

  • I love those places.

  • Right! So fun!

  • Like, it makes you feel like nostalgic, even if you're not like--

  • I wasn't in Japan during that period but like any time like, when

  • I first came to Japan back in like in 2005, every single time I would visit

  • friends grandparents or something, their house looked like that room that we sat

  • in, right? So. Welcome to a new segment we're doing here on TV Play where I just sit

  • with Shiori in unique places and talk about stuff and things. The first

  • thing that I ever became obsessed with in Japan was dagashi (penny candy) so like to

  • see the dagashi setups and stuff like thatso you get like this kind of

  • feel like these type of chairs and something. They actually keep some of this stuff in Tokyo

  • they actually have little, like games, yeah! These phones are usually black, right?

  • Yeah, that's why they call them like black phone, right? We have them in all

  • different colors! It didn't have to be black. One of my friends was telling

  • me that after the earthquake when phones wouldn't connect, they connected their

  • old black phone and it still worked!

  • Really? So this is like their emergency phone then?

  • So this is the sento (public bath) entrance. So usually here, obaa-san or ojii-san (grandma or grandpa) is waiting

  • the reception, a lady or man is already waiting for the customer and the men

  • entering from here, and women come in from here and where the cameraman is positioned, there should be a wall

  • but this person can see both the naked men and naked women, collecting the

  • money to enter the sento or onsen. It's so interesting right?

  • After that, we ate soba and then we drove back to the hotel, where we took a bit of a rest before shooting stars.

  • We wanted to do some night photography. That didn't play out the way we expected it to though.

  • It was fun! How do I say it? We really wished we could've filmed those extra fun moments... could you explain what happened to us?

  • So basically, we got out there! We got out into the mountains and we were like all excited and then all

  • the clouds came over and then the drive was much longer than we were initially

  • expecting and we've been driving something like four days when we

  • realized that we still had a 20 or 30 minute drive to go. All gas stations

  • anywhere in like a a 40 kilometer radius were all closed and we were on one bar of gas left.

  • But, Norm is a very, very, very awesome specialist for cars as well. Huh? You think your fans know about that?

  • You know, the people who watch my channel know a bit about how I used to do a lot of car stuff in

  • Japan. That's kind of how I started before I did YouTube and before I did shamisen.

  • But I think that if you were a fan of Norm recently from Tokyo Creative, maybe you don't

  • know much about how crazy he is and incredible he is. He was so smooth (while driving) like skiing because we were like

  • panicking, "oh no! Only one bar of the gas left so how should we get to the gas station?!" So most of

  • TC crew were like "please Norm! Try your hardest" and he said, "don't worry, I can do it!". And then after that it was like skiing. There were so many curves down the mountain but

  • me, T-man (Japanese sales staff) and Kenji (camera man) were behind his car and he was like swish, swish!

  • He legitimately didn't use any brakes because we were looking at his brake lights. It was amazing!

  • it was because we didn't use the gas either! We made it to

  • the gas station though, everything worked out! We made it there just as the the gas

  • went to zero, so. All worked out!

  • That was dramatic! I guess you guys took videos of you guys dancing in the night or something like that. That's totally behind the scenes.

  • We're like waiting for you guys and like, dancing in the mountains in front

  • of car lights. I guess that brings us up to today:

  • We did so much today, didn't we! We went

  • to Saiki City! It was my first time for me to visit there. How was it?

  • It was really nice! Especially getting up in the mountain and the lunch!

  • So we ordered the Shio-Koji Gozen.

  • And I got the Kaisen-don. I love a good Kaisen-don.

  • Actually everything. I could just right now just make a list of everything

  • that was nice but it was everything that we did, yeah so.

  • We went to the Koji factory, which has lasted for 330 years.

  • Koji means... sorry I can't really explain it in English nicely.

  • It's like a micro-organism. It's actually used a lot with a whole

  • bunch of different stuff. Like, it's used for things like sake, it's used for cooking,

  • it's used for pickling vegetables and whatnot.

  • Koji is used for any seasonings. Every single meal, has some kind of koji as seasoning or as salt.

  • So this one has a lot of umami and I've learned so many things from

  • Myoho-san and it was so interesting. I love her so much!

  • Oh my god. She was like probably one of the... outside of the food and the company, she

  • was probably the best part of today!

  • And she explained to us so many things about Japanese food culture as well.

  • Food definitely helps with family bonding. Is that correct? Bonding?

  • That works!

  • I love cooking but personally I don't use Koji for my cooking. But luckily, we got a sample

  • from her so I'm thinking to start cooking with Koji more often from now on.

  • It was like through Koji and stuff like that is a more traditional way of cooking.

  • Very traditional mom's seasoning for Japanese washoku (Japanese-style food) food so I need to learn how to maximize

  • this Koji power. I think we are going to talk about Koji in Tokyo Creative News in more

  • details later so please check the link down below.

  • After lunch, we climbed up to the Saiki Castle.

  • It's like that the remains or ruins orthere wasn't actually any castle ruins but it's where the castle was and they told

  • us it was a 15 minute climb.

  • But?

  • It wasn't a 15 minute climb...

  • Nice to meet you!

  • But on the nice side, when we got up there, it was really hot. The view was gorgeous, and

  • then it cooled us down with a nice brisk rain.

  • It's so hot but it's worth it!

  • It was definitely worth it, yeah.

  • So this is all of Saiki City!

  • You can see my house! I'm joking!

  • I know where you live!

  • The hike was nice.

  • Yeah, the hike was nice.

  • Yeah, I guess that brings us up to now. I always like to recap on the trip and ask if you had a favorite moment but it's a dangerous question for me

  • right now because I don't have a favorite moment. I loved literally the whole thing.

  • But I have one actually.

  • What's that?

  • Well, this trip, Norm took a bunch of strange pictures of me.

  • When you were hanging out of a car, very like, !I've been kidnapped!"

  • Yeah... so that was a thing. My train is in like ten minutes.

  • Oh no!

  • I hate to do this but I'm gonna have to get going.

  • Thank you for coming!

  • Well, thank you for having me! If you guys had

  • a particular spot or something in this video that you liked the most

  • let us know down below. If you're new to the channel, I'd say subscribe but maybe

  • go check out a couple more TC Play videos, leave us some comments so we can

  • see where you have been! Thank you guys so much for joining, thank you for having me.

  • It was fun!

  • And don't forget to subscribe to Tokyo Lens as well!

  • Thank you guys once more, and we will see you again, real soon.

  • Bye!!

Hey guys! Welcome to Oita in Japan. I'm Norm and this is Shiori!

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    Summer posted on 2020/04/28
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