Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • We want to thank Google's Science Journal App for supporting PBS Digital Studios.

  • Imagine you had a time machine and with the press of a button you could transport yourself

  • to your own 75th birthday.

  • Assuming you're still around, what do you hope to find yourself doing?

  • Writing your memoirs?

  • Sailing around the world?

  • Partying in San Junipero?

  • Very few of us would answercleaning toilets at a fast-food joint,” orbegging for

  • change on the street.”

  • No one wants their story to end that way, yet shockingly few of us are taking the basic

  • steps to avoid it.

  • The simple fact is that if we're lucky to live

  • long enough, one day we will lose our desire (or physical ability) to keep earning a paycheck.

  • The older we get, the harder it becomes to maintain a rigid work schedule.

  • And as modern medicine allows us to live longer and longer, the time we expect to spend in

  • retirement might easily pass 30 years.

  • Think of that for a second.

  • 30 years without income.

  • Nervous yet?

  • Good.

  • So how much would you need to not spend those years in abject poverty.

  • Well, that depends on your personal needs, standard of living, health issues, etc., but

  • as a starting point, the AARP recommends that to replace a $40,000 per year income for 30

  • years, you'll need to start your retirement with--take a deep breath--$1.18 million.

  • If that number makes you feel a little dizzywell, you're not alone.

  • In one survey, Americans between 55 and 64 reported a median retirement savings of $120,000--only

  • 10% of the amount advised by the AARP!

  • Another survey found that 75% of Americans over 40 are behind saving for retirement and

  • 28% over 55 have no retirement savings at all!

  • There are many factors that contributed to this problem.

  • For one thing, wage growth declined in the 70s and 80s.

  • It picked back up in the 90s, but then the housing boom convinced a lot of Americans

  • to go into debt to buy overpriced homes, and, well, we know how that turned out.

  • We've also seen an increase in cultural pressure to showvisual displays of wealth.”

  • A study published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics suggests that Americans are uniquely

  • concerned about seeming poor to others, so they spend a disproportionate amount on things

  • like shoes, clothes and cars.

  • It's been great business for designer labels and advertisers--not so much for our savings

  • accounts.

  • Lastly, changes in government policies have made it easier to not save money.

  • In the past, employees were automatically enrolled indefined benefit planswith

  • pre-set funding amounts to match their retirement needs.

  • Today's workers have toopt into retirement plans like 401(k)s, and figure

  • out for themselves how much to set aside.

  • Furthermore, these plans are oftenleaky,” meaning you're allowed to remove funds prematurely,

  • which makes it easy to steal from your own retirement.

  • Does all this mean that saving for retirement is hopeless and you should just blow your

  • extra dough leasing a sports car?

  • No!

  • It's still very possible to save up large amounts of money on a modest income.

  • The three special ingredients are Good Markets, Compound Interest, and Time.

  • To show you how these elements work together, it's time to

  • RUN THE NUMBERS!

  • Betty is 30 years old and makes $50,000/yr.

  • She hasn't saved a dime for retirement yet, but this year she's decided to start.

  • Between the amount she is going to save into her Roth IRA, her 401(k) at work, and her

  • 401(k) match, she's putting away $625 a month, or $7,500 a year, That's 15% of her

  • income--which many experts recommend as a good savings target.

  • At this rate, by the time she's 65, Betty will have personally deposited $262,500 into

  • her retirement account.

  • Impressive, but still a long way from the million dollars plus she'll need to retire.

  • But now we add our special ingredients!

  • Over the last 90 years, the stock market has grown an average of 9.8% per year.

  • But let's assume a little less than thatsay, 7.5% If Betty can put together a decent

  • portfolio, she can expect her savings to grow by an average of 7.5% per year.

  • And as long as Betty doesn't touch that account, the dividends and interest she earns

  • will generate even more dividends and interest!

  • And over time, her savings doesn't just increase in a straight lineit increases

  • exponentially!

  • Now, by the time she's 65, that $262,500 of her original money has ballooned to $1,277,158.92.

  • Nice job Betty!

  • A couple things to keep in mind with this scenario.

  • It's very likely that goods and services will cost more in the future due to inflation.

  • However, it's also very likely that a 30 year old like Betty will see her salary increase

  • as she gains more experience and skill.

  • If she sticks to that same 15% of her salary, she can expect to have even more set aside

  • for retirement.

  • What if you're older than Betty and getting a late start?

  • Well, that may mean that you need to set aside more of your paycheck, say 20 or 25 percent.

  • Or you may have to wait until your 70s to retire.

  • Either of these options is better than doing nothing or counting on winning the lottery.

  • There are many other factors that can change your specific situation.

  • Inheritances, social security, pensions, medical conditions.

  • If you're not sure where to begin, you can seek out the help of a financial planner who

  • is a sworn fiduciary.

  • They can outline a plan that fits your needs and show you that preparing for retirement

  • is not as intimidating as you may think.

  • You don't have to be into shuffleboard or bird-watching to expect a little time off

  • in your golden years.

  • And some people want to work as long as they can.

  • But everyone wants the power to decide that for themselves, especially after a lifetime

  • of hard work.

  • Of course, if you do manage to get access to a time machine, you can always fall back

  • on the oldSports Almanac Retirement Plan.”

  • And that's our two cents!

  • Thanks to Google for supporting PBS Digital Studios.

  • Their mobile app, Science Journal lets you take notes and measure scientific phenomena such as

  • light, sound, and motion, using your phone, tablet or Chromebook.

  • You can find activity ideas and additional information on their website at g.co/sciencejournal

We want to thank Google's Science Journal App for supporting PBS Digital Studios.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US retirement betty income journal expect time machine

Is Retirement Even POSSIBLE?

  • 10 0
    Capalu Yang posted on 2020/04/24
Video vocabulary