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  • Hello, everyone. And welcome to this English course on adverbs.

  • In this video, I'm gonna talk to you about adverbs of degree.

  • Adverbs of degree tell us about the intensity of something.

  • The power of something.

  • Now in English, they're usually placed before the adjective or adverb or verb that they modify.

  • But obviously, as always, there are exceptions.

  • And there are very common adverbs of degree that I'm sure you use all the time.

  • Uhm... 'too', 'enough', 'very', 'extremely',

  • But there are so many others.

  • Okay? So let's dive into it and learn about adverbs of degree.

  • Let's have a look at a few examples of adverbs of degree.

  • Especially how they are used with adjectives, adverbs and verbs.

  • Now adverbs of degree are usually placed before the adjectives and adverbs that they modify.

  • And before the main verb of the sentence.

  • For example, in the sentence,

  • 'The water was extremely cold.'

  • You have the adjective 'cold' and the adverb 'extremely' that modifies the adjective cold.

  • And as you can, see the adverb is placed before the adjective that it modifies.

  • Second example, 'He just left.'

  • In this case, the adverb 'just' comes before the verb 'left',

  • which is the main verb of the sentence.

  • 'She is running very fast.'

  • Now in this case, we have two adverbs.

  • The adverb 'fast' and the adverb 'very' that modifies the adverb 'fast'.

  • And as you can see, our adverb 'very' is placed before the adverb that it modifies.

  • And finally, 'They are completely exhausted from the trip.'

  • The adverb completely modifies the adjective 'exhausted'

  • And is therefore placed before it.

  • I hope you understand, guys.

  • Let's move on.

  • Okay, guys. Let's practice pronunciation now.

  • Please repeat after me.

  • 'The water was extremely cold.'

  • 'He just left.'

  • 'She is running very fast.'

  • 'They are completely exhausted from the trip.'

  • Good job, guys. Let's move on.

  • Some very common adverbs of degree in English are 'enough', 'very' and 'too'.

  • Let's look at a few examples.

  • 'Is your coffee hot enough?'

  • So in this case, our adverb 'enough' modifies the adjective, 'hot'.

  • 'He didn't work hard enough.'

  • In that case, our adverb 'enough' modifies another adverb, the adverb 'hard'.

  • And as you can see, the adverb 'enough' is usually placed after the adjective or adverb that it modifies.

  • Another example is 'very'.

  • 'The girl was very beautiful.'

  • So the adverb 'very' modifies our adjective 'beautiful'.

  • 'He worked very quickly,'

  • So in this case, our adverb 'very' modifies the adverb 'quickly'.

  • And as you can see, 'very' is usually placed before the word that it modifies.

  • And finally, our third example is 'too'.

  • 'This coffee is too hot.'

  • It modifies the adjective 'hot'.

  • 'He works too hard.'

  • In that case, 'too' modifies the adverb 'hard'.

  • And as you can see, 'too', is usually placed before the word that it modifies.

  • Okay? I hope you got it.

  • Let's move on.

  • Let's now focus on pronunciation. Please repeat after me.

  • 'Is your coffee hot enough?'

  • 'He didn't work hard enough.'

  • 'The girl was very beautiful.'

  • 'He worked very quickly.'

  • 'This coffee is too hot.'

  • 'He works too hard.'

  • Okay, guys. Let's move on.

  • Okay, guys.

  • Let's do a little bit of extra practice with a few example sentences.

  • 'He speaks very quickly.'

  • Can you spot the adverb of degree?

  • It's 'very'.

  • And it modifies the other adverb of the sentence, 'quickly'.

  • 'He speaks too quickly.'

  • Now, another very common adverb of degree, 'too'.

  • Be very careful. There's a difference between 'very' and 'too'.

  • 'Very' is a fact.

  • 'Too' means there's a problem. Okay? He speaks so quickly that you cannot understand.

  • 'He speaks too quickly.'

  • Another example,

  • 'My teacher is terribly angry.'

  • Where is the adverb of degree?

  • It's the adverb, 'terribly'.

  • That modifies the adjective, 'angry'.

  • 'They were almost finished.'

  • Can you spot the adverb?

  • It's 'almost'.

  • And it modifies the verb, 'finished'.

  • Okay? So we're not finished yet.

  • We're 'almost' finished.

  • And finally, 'This box isn't big enough.'

  • The adverb of degree in this case is the adverb 'enough'

  • and it modifies our adjective 'big'.

  • And remember, 'enough' usually goes after the word that it modifies.

  • Okay? I hope you get it, guys.

  • Time for some pronunciation practice. Please repeat after me.

  • 'He speaks very quickly.'

  • 'He speaks too quickly.'

  • 'My teacher is terribly angry.'

  • 'They were almost finished.'

  • 'This box isn't big enough.'

  • Good job, guys.

  • Okay, guys. You now know a lot more about adverbs of degree.

  • And I'm sure this video will help you improve your English,

  • But keep practicing.

  • And make sure you watch the other videos on adverbs.

  • They're very useful as well.

  • Thank you for watching and see you next time.

  • Thank you guys for watching my video.

  • If you liked it, please show me your support. Click 'like', subscribe to our Channel.

  • Put your comments below and share it with all your friends.

  • See you!

Hello, everyone. And welcome to this English course on adverbs.

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A2 adverb modifies adjective degree quickly speaks

Adverbs of Degree | Learn Basic English Grammar Course

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    Summer posted on 2020/04/23
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