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  • Hi, Bob the Canadian here.

  • Welcome to this English lesson

  • where I'm going to talk about,

  • a few really little things.

  • I'm going to talk about some tiny things.

  • And not only will I tell you what it is,

  • but I'm also going to teach you a few English phrases,

  • or a few English idioms

  • that use the name of that tiny thing.

  • (pop music)

  • Well hey, welcome to this English lesson

  • about tiny tiny things.

  • Before we get started though,

  • if you are new here,

  • please click that red subscribe button below

  • and give me a thumbs up if this video helps you learn

  • just a little bit more English.

  • (paper rustles softly)

  • One of the first small things I wanted to talk about,

  • is the dot on an i.

  • You can see here that this dot is rather large

  • because I printed out the word it,

  • in a really really large font.

  • But, one really tiny thing is,

  • the dot on the letter i.

  • And this reminded me of an English phrase,

  • to dot your i's, and to cross your t's.

  • Notice there's a t here as well.

  • So, this i has a dot

  • and this t is crossed.

  • When we say that someone dots their i's

  • and crosses their t's.

  • It means that they've done a job thoroughly

  • and completely,

  • and that they've done the job well.

  • We say that they did the job so well,

  • that they dotted all their i's

  • and they crossed all their t's.

  • So this is the salt shaker from my kitchen.

  • In English, we call this a salt shaker.

  • And you can see there's little holes in the top

  • and if I shake it,

  • then some salt will come out onto my hand.

  • These are called grains of salt

  • and they are really, really tiny.

  • And they make food taste really good.

  • But there's three phrases I wanted to talk about

  • that have the word salt in them.

  • I'll just put this salt down here.

  • The first is, if you describe someone

  • as being the salt of the earth,

  • it means that they are just a really

  • honest, hard working person.

  • I would describe my grandparents

  • when they were alive as being the salt of the earth.

  • They were people who worked hard,

  • and they were honest in all their dealings with people.

  • The second phrase I wanted to teach you

  • with the word salt in it,

  • is the phrase to rub salt in someone's wounds.

  • If you have something bad happen to you in life,

  • maybe you have a car accident

  • and then your friend keeps talking about the car accident

  • we would say that he is rubbing salt in your wounds

  • because the car accident was already a bad thing.

  • And you feel bad

  • because your car is wrecked.

  • But now your friend keeps talking about it.

  • So, we would refer to that as,

  • rubbing salt in your wounds.

  • It is not a very nice thing to do.

  • The last phrase I wanna teach you

  • with the word salt in it is,

  • to take something with a grain of salt.

  • So, if someone tells you something

  • and you are a little bit skeptical,

  • you don't really believe them right away,

  • we would say that you are taking what they say

  • with a grain of salt.

  • In English when you take something with a grain of salt,

  • it means you don't believe it right away,

  • but you take a little bit of time to think about it

  • to make sure that it is true information.

  • So this is a Canadian penny.

  • It is our one cent coin.

  • And, it actually has a maple leaf on one side

  • and then on the other side,

  • hopefully this focuses,

  • you can see that it has Queen Elizabeth.

  • So, a penny is worth one cent.

  • Here is a cool fact,

  • we don't actually use pennies in Canada anymore.

  • You can use them if you want.

  • But when you're at the store,

  • everything always rounds off

  • to the closest five cent mark now.

  • Anyways, a couple phrases

  • with the word penny in it.

  • The one is, you can say to someone,

  • a penny for your thoughts.

  • So let's say you are with a friend,

  • and they are not very talkative.

  • You could say to them,

  • hey, penny for your thoughts.

  • And basically what that means is, hey,

  • can you just tell me what you're thinking about?

  • I'll jokingly give you some money.

  • I'll give you a penny if you tell me

  • what you're thinking about.

  • So, if someone is sitting

  • and not talking much,

  • and you think they have something cool to say,

  • you can say to them, hey, penny for your thoughts.

  • And basically, you're just welcoming them

  • to kind of talk about what they are thinking about.

  • The second phrase with the word penny in it is the phrase,

  • a penny saved, is a penny earned.

  • And what this phrase means in English

  • and it would mean the same in any language is that,

  • if you don't spend money,

  • it is almost the same as making money.

  • So, if you have a penny,

  • and the weekend comes

  • and you don't spend the penny,

  • or maybe you're talking more like $10.

  • If you don't spend it,

  • it's almost the same as if you have earned an extra penny.

  • So a penny saved, is a penny earned basically means,

  • if you don't spend your money,

  • it's a lot like making extra money.

  • It's not exactly the same thing.

  • But I think you get the point.

  • So, this is my wedding ring.

  • The wedding ring by the way goes on the ring finger.

  • Oh, if you didn't know the names

  • of the fingers in English, I'll tell you.

  • This is your thumb.

  • This is your index finger.

  • This is your middle finger,

  • which is a bad thing if you turn this way

  • and only show this finger.

  • That's a bad thing in English.

  • This is your middle finger.

  • This is your ring finger,

  • and this is your pinkie or pinky finger.

  • By the way, a ring is a very tiny thing.

  • And, your pinky finger is also a very small thing.

  • There's two phrases I wanna teach you

  • with the word ring in it.

  • They don't have to do exactly with a wedding ring.

  • But the first phrase I wanted to teach you is,

  • to give someone a ring.

  • So, if you hear

  • that someone has given someone a ring,

  • it usually means that they are engaged,

  • to be married.

  • So, if I think about

  • when I was a much younger Bob the Canadian

  • there was a time when I gave Jen a ring.

  • I asked Jen to marry me and I gave her a ring.

  • But, you know, the same phrase,

  • to give someone a ring

  • means something else as well.

  • I could say that the other day I gave Jen a ring,

  • which means, that I gave her a phone call.

  • So the phrase to give someone a ring,

  • can mean that two people got engaged.

  • That one of the couple gave the other one a ring,

  • and they are now engaged to be married.

  • Or if you say,

  • the other day I gave someone a ring,

  • it means that you gave them a phone call.

  • So this is a pin.

  • In English, we call this a pin.

  • And we use this to hang things,

  • sometimes on