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  • Is, um, it might seem like a relatively simple topic, but, uh,

  • the news, um, when I started researching this lesson there is, uh,

  • there are a lot of things that I can teach you about the news in English.

  • So welcome to this English lesson about the news. Um,

  • I'm going to jump right to the first page, uh,

  • today and talk about news sources.

  • But first let me make sure

  • that everything is working. It looks like everything is working well at my end.

  • Um, again, we are here for a lesson about the news.

  • People are curious about what is happening in the world and what is happening

  • around them. So most of us actually are interested in the news.

  • Um, the news can be local, it can be, uh, the news of your country.

  • It can be news from the world, uh,

  • and you can get the news in a variety of different ways.

  • So thank you for being here for this lesson about the news. As I said,

  • we're going to start by talking about news sources.

  • So when you talk about news sources,

  • that means where you get your news from.

  • So some of us are old and we still get our news from the TV.

  • So we watch TV news. Notice there I said that you watch the news.

  • Um, let's see here. Uh, yes, Deek,

  • I've changed the color of the form and I've limited people to one question again

  • that seemed to work well last Saturday. Uh, for those of you that aren't aware,

  • you can only ask one question today. We're trying to, uh,

  • limit the amount of questions. But news source, you can watch TV news.

  • I mostly watch TV news. You can read the newspaper.

  • So you watch the news on TV, you read the newspaper, uh,

  • perhaps you listen to the news on the radio.

  • That is still a very common way for people to, um, listen to the news.

  • Or maybe you read the news on the internet,

  • maybe you go to Google news or maybe you have an app, uh,

  • possibly on your phone that you use to read the news. Um, so those are,

  • I would think the four major news sources. Um, there might be others,

  • but these are the major four news sources.

  • The place where people get their news from. Um, so again, uh,

  • we're going to start by talking a little bit about TV news.

  • This is news that you get while you are watching television. Um, and again,

  • this is my favorite way, uh,

  • to watch the news are to get the news is on the television.

  • Sometimes after supper at 6:00 PM,

  • we turn on the television so that we can watch the news. Uh,

  • and when you watch news on TV,

  • you are most likely watching news from a news network.

  • So a news network is something like CNN. In Canada,

  • we have CBC news,

  • this stands for the Canadian broadcasting corporation news.

  • But generally you will watch a news network.

  • I think most of you are familiar with CNN.

  • This is a rather large news network from the United States.

  • Some of you might be familiar with CBC news. Um, interesting fact.

  • This news network has English broadcasting and French broadcasting.

  • So in Canada you can watch the news in English.

  • You can also watch the news in French. I, from time to time,

  • watch the news in French. Uh,

  • because that's a really good way for me to practice my French listening skills.

  • So if you watch news on TV, it is from a news network.

  • The person who is on the TV that is doing the talking would be most often called

  • a reporter,

  • but we would also call them a TV journalist. Okay.

  • So this is a reporter or a TV journalist. You can use either word.

  • Um, the, these are the people that go out into the world, uh,

  • and they research what is happening. Uh, and they will report on the news.

  • So a reporter has the name reporter because they report the news.

  • Okay? So, um, I think TV journalists is, um,

  • common as well. But for me, when I speak English, I would use the word reporter,

  • television reporter. Um,

  • if I knew someone who was on TV as a reporter,

  • I would refer to them as a reporter. Um,

  • I'm going to jump over and do some questions right away to get started.

  • First question is from Vitaly Smirnoff. Hi teacher Bob.

  • I hope you're having a great Friday. I'm going to say it again.

  • It's the best time for the stream, one hour before I leave for work. Um,

  • which news source do you prefer? I prefer,

  • so I said I prefer the news on TV, but I also read Google news,

  • so I go to Google news.google.com quite often.

  • But my preferred method is to just sit on the couch and use the remote control

  • to turn on the TV and watch the news that way.

  • And it's definitely my favorite way to watch the news. Um, next question.

  • I'll just do a few questions here. Kaiya says, hi Bob news.

  • What's more popular in Canada? Just want to know the info boat Canada. Thanks.

  • I think all the different kinds of news are popular in Canada.

  • I think a lot of people get their news or read the news on the internet or on

  • their phone using a news app, but I'm not sure what is the most popular.

  • Um, next question from Gregory. Hi Bob. What is your favorite newspaper?

  • What is your favorite kind of news, thanks for the answer.

  • So my favorite newspaper is the globe and mail. Um,

  • I actually have a copy of the globe and mail rate here. Uh,

  • so this is, you can see there the globe and mail.

  • This is a popular Canadian newspaper. We get it at school.

  • So I often read it at work on my break. So anyways,

  • just a quick, quick, a quick pause.

  • There's no such word as quick in English. A quick pause if you're new here.

  • Thank you so much for being here. We have about 328 people watching.

  • We are talking about the news. If you are not a subscriber to my channel,

  • there is a button over there,

  • a red button that says subscribe and you should click it. Give me a thumbs up.

  • Also during the lesson you can ask questions using the link that either Dave or

  • Todd will put into the chat and I will try to answer as many of those questions

  • as possible.

  • And let's keep the chat for conversation and let's keep the chat in English.

  • That is the best way to do this. Let me do one more question. Uh,

  • Dick Shantz has the next question.

  • Do you prefer reading the news online or reading the newspaper?

  • Do you think newspapers will become less common in the future as reading the

  • news online is more convenient. That is already happening in Canada.

  • Newspapers, the print version of the newspaper, um,

  • is having trouble surviving in Canada. Okay.

  • So more and more people are reading online, so yes.

  • [inaudible] I think newspapers will eventually become completely digital.

  • Um, anyways, let's continue talking about TV news.

  • The person here is called an anchor. Okay. This is a news anchor.

  • Um, I think we used to say anchorman, but now there's men and women.

  • So instead of anchorman, we just say news anchor. Um,

  • because both genders can equally work in the field of TV news.

  • So here we have a news anchor.

  • The news anchor is usually at the news desk. Okay?

  • The news anchor is not usually outside of the newsroom.

  • The news anchor doesn't go out to report on the news.

  • The anchor is usually at the desk and they are the main person that talks while

  • you watch the TV news. So that is the anchor. Um, the person,

  • let me go here.

  • The person who goes out to report the news is the person that we would call a

  • reporter. Okay. So just a little difference there.

  • The anchor is inside the reporter is often outside.

  • We also have what we would call a correspondent.

  • So a news correspondent is usually, um,

  • from my understanding a person who is in another country or who is far away

  • reporting on the news.

  • Often when there is a war in some part of the world,

  • there will be war correspondence.

  • So a correspondent is someone who goes to a part of the world where there is

  • news to report on, uh, and they report back to, um,

  • the news desk or the news network.

  • So a little bit different than a reporter.

  • I mean a correspondent is technically a reporter,

  • but a correspondent would be someone who is out in the field. We would say.

  • Um, so we have camera man, camera woman.

  • So this is the person that you usually don't see when you are watching the news.

  • Um, but we definitely have the people who operate the equipment.

  • So whenever you see a reporter or a correspondent,

  • there is often a camera person,

  • a cameraman or a camera woman operating the camera so that you can see the news.

  • Sometimes we forget when we watch the news that there is a camera person

  • somewhere. Um, but there definitely is a camera person somewhere.

  • Um, when you are watching, um,

  • the news you would say that they are,

  • you are watching a news story or a news segment.

  • So this current segment is on American politics or this current story is about

  • American politics. You can use either words.

  • When I talk to my coworkers I would say things like,

  • did you see that story on the news yesterday about that plane crash or some

  • other news story. So we definitely refer to those,

  • um, who are reporting, they are telling the story. It is a news story. Um,

  • I, I'm just going to pause and say hi to everyone in the chat.

  • There are a lot of people saying hello to me.

  • Thank you very much for being here and seeing hi. I really,

  • really do appreciate it. Um, for those just joining us,

  • we are doing a lesson about the news.

  • I'm going over all different English words and phrases that you would use if you

  • are talking about the news.

  • And we are in the middle of talking about a TV news.

  • Let me find that sheet. We're about halfway through talking about TV news,

  • one of the four news sources. Um,

  • so I referred to this earlier. Um,

  • the people who are at the news or in the newsroom, uh,

  • we also call this a studio,

  • but these people are reporting the news from a newsroom.

  • So the room behind them, we would call a newsroom.

  • We would also call this a studio. Okay.

  • So that is where the anchors would be located.

  • They would be in the newsroom or in the studio.

  • And you'll often hear a reporter say,

  • and we're going to go back to bill in the studio,

  • or we're going to go back to the studio and Joe is going to talk about the

  • weather. Okay. So often you will hear them refer to the studio, uh,

  • as the newsroom. Um, or the new,

  • they'll refer to the studio as the place where the dues is coming from. Uh,

  • often when a reporter is out in the field,

  • we also say that they are on location.

  • So when a reporter is outside reporting on the news from the location where the

  • news is happening, we would say that they are on location. Okay.

  • So you'll even hear things like, um,

  • we're going to go to Jane who is downtown on location where there is a parade.

  • Okay.

  • So on location means that they are at the place where some news event or a news

  • story is happening or unfolding. Okay.

  • Let me get a little drink of water here

  • and then we'll do a few more questions.

  • We talked about camera man and camera woman.

  • We would refer to all of the people involved in the news as the news crew.

  • So when you, uh, sometimes are in your downtown area,

  • you will see a news crew.

  • So you will see a sound person and a camera and a cameraman and the news

  • reporter, you will see all of these people. Oh,

  • Susanna just said on the scene in the chat. That is another location.

  • Yes or sorry, another way to refer to it. You could say, um,

  • Phil is on the scene at the, um, where the accident is downtown.

  • So on location, on the scene. Um, but yes,

  • the news crew is the group of people, um,

  • that goes out to report the news and often they will be in a news van and I

  • forgot to make a picture, but they could also be, uh,

  • reporting the news from a helicopter.

  • Some news networks have a helicopter in the air, you know,

  • [inaudible], you know, the sound of a helicopter. Um,

  • but I only made a picture of a news van. So you definitely have, um,

  • different vehicles that news reporters use in order to get to the location where

  • the news is happening. Um, and then the last one,

  • I kind of mentioned this earlier,

  • often a reporter who is reporting on a story from a location, uh,

  • out in the world where we'll say,

  • and now back to the studio where James is going to talk about the weather or

  • back to you. Jim. Um, thanks for letting me report on this story.

  • So you'll hear this phrase used when you watch the news. Uh, so that's TV news.

  • Um, I'm going to do a few questions.

  • I know I've been letting the questions build up. Oh yes,

  • there's Gaga has the next question. Gaga says,

  • what do you think about maybe people will abandon newspapers entirely in the

  • future with the development of technology?

  • I think newspapers will become fully digital.

  • I think they will definitely be online only in about 10 years.

  • Henry from Taiwan. Hi Bob.

  • How does teacher Bob deal with fake news or the spreading of misinformation?

  • Thank you. I try to read multiple news stories.

  • So if I read one news story and I find it hard to believe Henry,

  • I will try to find other new stories to read. Okay.

  • So that if I read three or four stories on the same topic and I try to always

  • get my news from a reliable source like CBC news,

  • the Canadian broadcasting corporation, um, Oh, thank you so much, uh,

  • for becoming a member.

  • I have trouble pronouncing names when it's not the standard English alphabet,

  • but sometimes [inaudible] will help me,

  • but thank you so much for becoming a member. That is awesome of you. Um,

  • next question. Let's see. Um,

  • next question is from Lala Lolita. Hi dear teacher. We miss you a lot.

  • How have you been? I've been good. How can we say what's new?

  • If we meet someone? Come on.

  • [inaudible] what other way to say that in English. Oh,

  • so not technically related to the news, but a yes,

  • we definitely just one sec here, Vitaly.