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  • Right, it is time! The moment has come!

  • This is a long awaitedlatevideo. How historically accurate is the movie "Mary, Queen of Scots"?

  • Oh boy, do I have feelings.

  • I made a video a few weeks ago

  • two months ago

  • about the film "The Favourite" and its treatment Queen Anne,

  • who was the English and then British queen between 1702 and 1714.

  • I mentioned at the end of that video to let me know which film you'd like me to review next

  • and said, I would do "Mary, Queen of Scots" and then

  • promptly forgot.

  • But we're here now.

  • I am ready to get my history geek on.

  • Ahem.

  • For theokay. No, that's, that's. Wow. Ugh.

  • Jesus, no. No, no glasses. No. Okay.

  • That was about it.

  • I actually have glasses with fake glass in and then I can just look suitably history "profeshor-ish" for these videos.

  • Professor-ish? "Profeshor-ish"...

  • Subscribe if you enjoy history, lesbians, disability awareness, and vintage fashion

  • with a comedic twist to everything because I honestly struggle to stay serious.

  • Also click the bell to get notifications,

  • and please do take a look at my little merch shelf down below or through the link in the description.

  • It's adorable!

  • See here.

  • Much like looking at the life of Queen Anne

  • that gorgeous disabled lesbian played by the wonderful Olivia Colman

  • the life of Mary, Queen of Scots, seems

  • quite personal to me?

  • Because I'm very obsessed with Philippa Gregory's historical novels,

  • and found the one concerning Mary very interesting.

  • So.... it....

  • But it kind of differed from what we've been taught about her in school

  • and then I start to dig deeper and begin researching into her life and her relationships,

  • particularly that with Elizabeth I, the Queen of England, who was her second cousin.

  • But before we get into the film...there's a dog coming to sit on my lap.

  • Hi!

  • Before we get into the film, let's begin with a little history lesson.

  • It's a big history lesson.

  • If you're English, you've most definitely heard of the Tudors, because all schoolteachers are apparently

  • obsessed with them!

  • So much so that you spend years and years learning about this one very specific royal family

  • to the extent that we know more about their family dramas than we do our own!

  • The Tudor dynastyactually, I'm not calling them a dynasty, they don't deserve that.

  • Don't at me.

  • The royal family began when a man called Henry Tudor killed the English king,

  • and decided thanks to his INCREDIBLY tenuous link to the crown.

  • His grandmother had been the king's wife, but his grandfather was actually a glorified servant who

  • she ran off with after she was widowed, and his mother descended from an illegitimate grandson

  • of a former king? So, sure, Henry sure.

  • Also you DEFINITELY didn't have the poor princess in the tower killed!

  • Ugh. So over Henry Tudor.

  • Anyway. He sucked as a person and as the king.

  • He also forced the rightful but female heir to the throne,

  • the beautiful granddaughter of my favorite historical figure, Jacquetta of Luxembourg, into marriage

  • by coercing her into having sex with him until she was pregnant and then didn't even properly crown her

  • until he was sure that the baby boy was actually going to make it to childhood.

  • Ugh!

  • Apparently he told her if she didn't have a baby boy with him,

  • he was going to try and force her son on her younger sisters who were all children!

  • Delightful, delightful man!

  • They had four children:

  • Arthur, who was great.

  • Margaret, who was less great.

  • Henry, who was not at all great,

  • and Mary, who was cute and I'm never gonna mention again.

  • Don't write that in your history exam, okay?

  • This video is not a verified reference document.

  • Sadly Arthur, who'd have been a great king because he was a refined, courageous young man

  • and kid who got all the best bits from his mother's side, died as a teenager not long after marrying the Spanish

  • Princess Catalina of Aragon, also known as Catherine.

  • Remember that face. She'll be back.

  • Margaret, the second child is important, too.

  • At the age of 14, she was married to the king of Scotland, James IV, and sent up north as essentially a

  • peace treaty of a person. The hope was that she would have many, many babies who would securely tie the

  • Kingdom of Scotland and England, and thus ensure that the Scottish would stop raiding the north of England

  • trying to start a war.

  • I mean, good luck with that.

  • Sure, you just give him such a more reason to invade England.

  • Now they ever claimed that for him too, but sure.

  • Unfortunately, she wasn't the brightest spark and continually angered the Scottish Lords

  • by making stupid decisions

  • with men.

  • Much like we'll see her granddaughter do in a minute.

  • Margaret and James had by all accounts a very good marriage and produced six children, although only one

  • actually survived infancy and later became James V at the age of seventeen months

  • when his father was killed by the English.

  • Margaret then attempted to act as regent for her son,

  • the baby king, but faced more than a bit of opposition

  • from the Scottish Lords, who were, um...

  • (clicks tongue)

  • Not best pleased by women having power,

  • especially an English woman.

  • Especially them. They were part of an alliance with the French against the English.

  • See? I told you that who princess peace treaty thing wouldn't work out.

  • It didn't.

  • Margaret is considered to have acted calmly and with some degree of political skill.

  • By July 1540 she'd even managed to reconcile the contending parties and

  • Scotland along with France concluded peace with England that very same month.

  • (claps)

  • Good job, Margaret! Hooray!

  • Oh, but then she ruined it.

  • Unfortunately. She was seduced by the Earl of Angus who was

  • insert-rude-word-here, and according to his own uncle a "young witless fool."

  • Apparently he was a magnetic presence who swayed Margaret into giving too much to his own family

  • and thus anger the other Lords, who turned against him, and, wow was that a drama.

  • Essentially, she started a civil war and then she ran away back to England leaving her children behind.

  • Well done.

  • So poor James V was the baby king, and he had to grow up fast!

  • But hopping back to England quickly.

  • Okay. With Margaret's older brother Arthur dead,

  • her younger brother Henry had become King,

  • King Henry VIII.

  • To start with he was young, charming, handsome, the dream king!

  • And he even married his brother's poor widow had been bitterly neglected and abused by their father.

  • Apparently because he actually wanted to marry her and then she said no. 'Cause... no.

  • Everything was great, except Henry and Catherine really struggled to have children.

  • Only one, Mary, survived babyhood and after 24 years together,

  • he divorced her in order to marry her maid-in-waiting, Anne Boleyn.

  • Please note, we are speeding through history here.

  • There were many other terrible things that

  • happened surrounding this marriage breakup and the way Catherine was treated.

  • Including Henry changing the religion of the entire country just so that he could say

  • that he was now head of the church and he could marry whomever he wanted.

  • These Henrys...

  • Despite the drama and shifting poor Catherine, Henry didn't even keep his interest in Anne up

  • and when she only gave him a daughter but no sons in three years,

  • he essentially invented a reason to chop off her head.

  • Three years! He gave her three years to have a son and then he chopped off her head.

  • (seethes)

  • The one daughter they did produce is very important to our story, however,

  • as she would grow up to be Elizabeth I, Queen of England,

  • as played by Margot Robbie in the film in question.

  • But okay. Just to condense history in this Henry dynamic a little more, Henry then married

  • Anne's lady-in-waiting, Jane Seymour, who died giving birth to that son Henry had wanted so much.

  • Not that he cared, apparently. He just had a feast

  • and then didn't even go to see her as she lay dying and asking for him

  • Ugh!

  • He then went on to marry three more women: divorced, beheaded and arrested, in that order.

  • But the last one was fortunately able to survive him, so

  • go her.

  • Once Henry had died, the crown then went to his son, who died young,

  • his oldest daughter, who died without children,

  • and then finally just Elizabeth. Because she was the only one left.

  • Oh yeah, and the entire religion of the country changed with every new monarch, which left many people dead

  • and absolutely everyone confused. Also no one could decide whether Elizabeth was legitimate or not

  • because maybe Henry had actually illegally divorced his first wife? Then like...

  • See? I told you. Those Tudors! All they do is ruin things! Ugh!

  • So Elizabeth I finally has her crown. Excellent!

  • But what's happening back in Scotland?

  • Well, you remember that her cousin James V was on the throne, right? Became king at seventeen months old?

  • Well, firstly, he had a pretty horrible childhood,

  • since despite being king all of the adults in his life basically just used him as a pawn

  • including his aforementioned terrible stepfather, who held him prisoner for three years and ruled in his place!

  • I mean, okay, don't worry then, James eventually escaped and then banished his entire step-family.

  • Go James!

  • He married twice, both to French princessesish

  • and tried to strengthen the ties there as his godfather was the king of France.

  • France and Scotland kind of had a thing.

  • It's like largely because they both hated the English.

  • I mean it was like a revenge coupling, really. You'll see more about that.

  • His first wife, Madeleine, had been very sickly since birth and her father, the King of France,

  • was not best pleased at the thought of his frail 16-year-old getting married

  • but couldn't really say no to James, since there was a treaty that promised him a French princess.

  • And oh, what do you know? She died six months into marriage.

  • This is why you pay attention to people's health complaints.

  • Anyway, less than a year later, he had a new wife, Mary de Guise, who was a widow with two sons already,