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  • Hey you!

  • Thanks for showing up just to study English with me.

  • Today I have a real treat.

  • We're going to learn English with TV.

  • Because sometimes you just want to be entertained when you learn.

  • We're going to take a scene from the ABC comedy 'Modern Family'.

  • Have you seen it?

  • It's really funny.

  • There are lot of great reductions in this scene.

  • What we're going to do is a full pronunciation analysis.

  • So we'll watch the scene and then we'll go back and together we'll study all of the reductions.

  • Things like flap T, stress.

  • Studying this will really help you understand how Americans speak, what they do so it will

  • increase you listening comprehension and then it will also help you sound more natural when

  • you speak American English.

  • So I call this kind of exercise a Ben Franklin exercise.

  • It starts with us just watching the scene.

  • Then together we'll do the full pronunciation analysis.

  • I'll make sure you'll understand everything that's happening and how things are being

  • pronounced.

  • Let's go ahead and get started with the scene.

  • >> What you guys laughing at?

  • Oh, I wouldn't worry about it.

  • You said something funny, didn't you?

  • The guy's a joke machine!

  • Oh, someone's sitting there.

  • Who?

  • Someone who doesn't ask a million questions.

  • Ah.

  • Grandpa you can sit with us.

  • Mmm, great.

  • And now, the analysis.

  • >> What you guys laughing at?

  • Okay, a single thought group.

  • Lots of reductions here.

  • What are you.

  • Well here's some stress on, stress on 'wha', some stress on 'guys', some stress on 'la'.

  • >> What you guys laughing at?

  • But are you unstressed?

  • Said really unclearly.

  • So, the word 'R' often reduces to schwa-R, rr, rr.

  • And then we would link with a flap T he links by actually I don't hear the R at all.

  • I hear what a, what a.

  • What are you, what are you, what are you.

  • The word U not reduced but it is unstressed.

  • Flat in pitch.

  • What are you, what are you, what are you, what are you, what are you, what are you guys.

  • Try that.

  • What are you guys.

  • >> What are you guys...

  • What you guys laughing at?

  • Guys laughing at.

  • Now, he drops the NG sound and instead makes just an N sound laughin', laughin', laughin'

  • at.

  • And then the N links into the vowel A, stop T at the end, laughin' at, laughin' at.

  • Try that.

  • >> laughing at?

  • Oh, I wouldn't worry about it.

  • Oh, I wouldn't worry about it.

  • All linked together, all connected.

  • Oh, I wouldn't.

  • Little stress there.

  • Worry.

  • Most stressed there.

  • About it.

  • But everything is very smooth.

  • There's no skips in the voice, there's no brakes.

  • >> Oh, I wouldn't worry about it.

  • He holds out the word 'oh'.

  • Oh, I. Links it right into the I diphthong.

  • >> Oh, I...

  • Oh, I wouldn't worry about it.

  • What about the 'n't'?

  • There are several different ways that Americans pronounce that rarely is it with T, a true

  • T release.

  • And here, I'm hearing 'wouldn't worry'.

  • I'm hearing the T is completely dropped.

  • I don't hear a stop, I hear the N linking right into the W sound.

  • Wouldn't worry, wouldn't worry.

  • So that is one way we pronounce an apostrophe T. Just without the T. That's what he's doing

  • here.

  • A reduction of a contraction.

  • >> I wouldn't worry about it.

  • Worry about it.

  • The ending E vowel links right into the schwa, the first syllable of about, about it.

  • And then a flap T is used to link the two words together.

  • We use a flap T to link words when it comes between two vowel sounds or after an R or

  • before a vowel.

  • About it, about it.

  • So it's not 'about it'.

  • With true Ts but it's 'about it'.

  • With a flap T and then a stop T. When you start studying T pronunciations, you realize

  • that it's not all that common to make a true T. It happens sometimes but most of the time,

  • the letter T is not pronounced as a true T. Here it was dropped completely, here it was

  • a flap T, and here it was a stop T. Here it was a flap T, and here it was a stop T. So

  • on this, in this two sentence fragment we have five Ts.

  • None of them are true Ts.

  • Making a true T a flap T or stop T or dropping it altogether does make English more smooth

  • and this linking together is so important for the character of American English.

  • >> I wouldn't worry about it.

  • You said something funny didn't you?

  • I'm going to stop here for a minute guys.

  • I have something important to tell you really quick.

  • If you would like this kind of analysis, I'm going to do 11 videos in a row starting June

  • 18.

  • It's the summer blockbuster movies We're going to be learning English with movies and I'm

  • going to make an extra free audio lesson to go with each video lesson.

  • If you want that, you'll have to sign up.

  • I'm not going to bombard people with emails so I only want to send people these free downloadable

  • audio lesssons if you want them.

  • So if you want to study English with movies this summer, follow this link here or on the

  • description below.

  • Pass it on to your friends, we're going to be doing this together.

  • It's going to be so fun.

  • I cannot wait to spend my summer with you.

  • Okay now back to this analysis.

  • >> I wouldn't worry about it.

  • You said something funny didn't you?

  • You said something funny didn't you?

  • Okay we have lots of reductions here.

  • You said something.

  • You and some, both have a little bit of length but really fun is the most stressed syllable

  • there.

  • You said some-thing.

  • Whats happening here?

  • How is that being pronounced?

  • >> You said something funny...

  • 'You' is fully pronounced 'you' but it is said quickly.

  • You said something.

  • I don't actually hear the D. Said something.

  • I hear the S sound, an E vowel linking right into the next sound, the S. The word said

  • which is a verb, a content word is said very unclearly here.

  • You said something.

  • Now what about something?

  • >> You said something funny...

  • Something.

  • Some'n.

  • Very casual way to pronounce this though you will hear regularly.

  • Some'n.

  • It's like S-U, a stop sound, the glottal stop and then M. Su-M, Su-M. So this is the U as

  • in butter vowel.

  • So those two sounds stay the same and then the stop is like the M, SU-M, and then the

  • M is made again to show the ending of the word.

  • It makes no sense.

  • It doesn't follow rules.

  • But this is how you will hear the word pronounced sometimes.

  • Su-M, Su-M, Su-M, Su-M.

  • >> something funny...

  • Actually, I think I'm going to change the way I wrote this in IPA.

  • I think I'm going to take away the stop symbol here and I think I am going to write it with

  • like an M, a stop and an M. Sum'm, sum'm, sum'm.

  • >> Something funny...

  • Anyway, go by what you hear.

  • Just imitate that.

  • Sum'm, sum'm.

  • >> Something funny, something funny, something

  • funny didn't you?

  • Didn't you? didn't you? didn't you?

  • Okay what's happening here?

  • Okay well first of all, the word 'you' reduced.

  • You, you, you.

  • Not an U vowel but a schwa instead.

  • What about the N'T here?

  • >> Didn't you?

  • Didn't you?

  • Didn't you?

  • To me it sounds like didn't you, didn't you.

  • The T is dropped.

  • We'll we knew that could happen.

  • I even feel that this D is dropped.

  • Din'ya, din'ya.

  • It's a lazy unclear way to say this but reductions happen.

  • They happen all the time.

  • Didn't you, didn't you, didn't you.

  • >> Didn't you?