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  • I want to speak really English from your first lesson.

  • Sign up for your free lifetime account at English Class 101 dot com.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • My name is Alicia.

  • In this lesson, I'm going to talk about the difference between adjectives that end in E.

  • D and adjectives that end in i N G.

  • We'll talk about how to decide when to use thes and when not to use thes.

  • We'll also do a short quiz at the end of the lesson to check your understanding.

  • Let's get started.

  • Okay, So first, let's begin with adjectives that end in E.

  • D.

  • So these are adjectives that we use to describe a feeling or an emotion in a person, or we can also use thes for animals.

  • So if you want to talk about your pets, you can use E D adjectives to talk about an emotion or a feeling you think they might be experiencing.

  • So let's look at some examples of E d adjective, some common e d ending adjectives here.

  • I'm so tired, tired ends and e.

  • D.

  • I'm tired here.

  • Another one.

  • He looks excited ends and e.

  • D.

  • The dog seems scared.

  • Ends and E.

  • D.

  • And are you bored?

  • Here?

  • We see the e.

  • D ending.

  • So each of thes example sentences includes an E d adjective because it's referring to someone's feeling or someone's emotion or, in this case, a dog's emotion.

  • And here I've included the word seems, because maybe we can't completely understand an animal's emotion, but we can say something like the dog.

  • It seems scared if you like, so make sure to use E D.

  • Ending adjectives for feelings and for emotions.

  • Okay, now, though, let's take a look at adjectives that end in I N g i N G ending adjectives.

  • So we use I n g ending adjectives when we want to describe the characteristics or the features of something.

  • So our trip was exciting.

  • So here we're talking about the trip, So travel.

  • Essentially, our trip was exciting.

  • There's no emotion here in the next example.

  • Work today was tiring, tiring, So work is tthe e item were describing thes air, the characteristics of work tiring, tiring of the characteristic.

  • I hope this lesson isn't boring.

  • I hope this lesson isn't boring.

  • This ends and I n g a characteristic of this lesson.

  • Then Children are exhausting.

  • Children are exhausting.

  • This ends in an I N G as well.

  • This is one example where I think people might experience some confusion here.

  • I've said Children are exhausting.

  • Please note the sentence.

  • Children are exhausted or the Children are exhausted is a very different sentence from Children are exhausting in this sentence.

  • Children are exhausting.

  • It means that to the speaker.

  • So if I'm a speaker, it means Children make me feel exhausted.

  • So the Children, maybe they have a lot of energy.

  • It takes a lot of time and energy and effort to play with kids to play with Children, so their characteristics that's so exhausting is a characteristic of them.

  • Their characteristic is that they are exhausting.

  • So maybe someone who is tired might say this.

  • Children are exhausting.

  • And then I could say I feel exhausted.

  • So please be careful.

  • Uh, Children.

  • The Children are exhausted, and Children are exhausting in this example, create very different sentences.

  • The sentence the Children are exhausted means the Children in the situation are tired.

  • They feel exhausted.

  • That's the Children's emotion at that point in time.

  • So please be careful of your choice in situations like this.

  • Okay, so to recap, I n g adjectives air used to describe the characteristics or the features of something or someone, as in this example, e D.

  • Ending.

  • Adjectives are used to describe our feelings or our emotions, and we can also use them to talk about the feelings and emotions of animals.

  • Okay, so let's try to put this together in a quiz I've prepared a few examples on will choose the correct form of the adjective in the blank.

  • So 1st 1 the movie Waas excited or exciting here we're talking about a movie.

  • It's not a person, it's not an emotion.

  • So exciting is the correct answer.

  • The movie was exciting is correct.

  • Next one, your brother looks, we have your brother looks tired or your brother looks tiring.

  • Here.

  • We're talking about the speaker's brother, your brother, and we're imagining something about his feelings or his his emotional state.

  • So we should use tired.

  • Your brother looks tired, is correct here.

  • Next one.

  • The news tonight is worried or the news tonight is worrying.

  • Here the focus is the news.

  • So some information.

  • This is not a person's emotion or a person's feeling, so we should use worrying.

  • The news tonight is worrying.

  • It causes me to worry next one.

  • This book is so bored or this book is so boring Here again, the focus is on an object.

  • This book in this case so we'll use boring.

  • This book is so boring.

  • Okay, next one.

  • There are two blanks here.

  • So let's choose the correct form.

  • We have work.

  • Today was something.

  • I'm something In the first sentence, the focus is work.

  • Work today Waas something So not a person.

  • Not a feeling, not an emotion.

  • So it's a characteristic work.

  • Today was exhausting.

  • Work today was exhausting in the 2nd 1 However, I'm so referring to a person's feelings.

  • I am here.

  • We should use exhausted work.

  • Today was exhausting.

  • I'm exhausted.

  • Finally, as we saw with this example about Children, let's look at this sentence.

  • My boss is I have the word terrified or my boss is terrifying, depending on your choice.

  • In this case, the meaning of the sentence will change significantly if we choose.

  • My boss is terrified.

  • It means that's my boss's emotion.

  • So terror refers to strong fear, being very, very afraid of something.

  • So my boss is terrified means my boss is experiencing fear, a strong amount of fear, a strong degree of fear.

  • My boss is terrified.

  • So this is kind of a negative situation about your boss's emotions.

  • If however we say my boss is terrifying, it means the boss.

  • The characteristic of the boss is that the boss, he or she is scary is a very, very scary person.

  • So the speaker feels terrified.

  • Perhaps so the boss causes that feeling of terror in the speaker.

  • So please be careful.

  • My boss is terrified and my boss is terrifying, are both grammatically correct sentences, but they have very different meanings.

  • So this is one example where it's very important to make the right choice between the e d ending adjective and the i N g ending adjective.

  • So both are Okay.

  • I hope you don't have a terrifying boss, and I hope your boss isn't terrified of a just in case.

  • This is one example to be cautious of.

  • Okay, so that's a quick introduction to when and how to use e d adjectives and I n g ending adjectives.

  • If you have any questions or if you want to practice or make some example.

  • Sentences.

  • Please feel free to do so in the comments section below this video.

  • If you like the video, please make sure to give it a thumb's up.

  • Subscribe to our channel, and you can check us out in English class 11 dot com for some other good resource is thanks very much for watching this lesson, and I will see you again soon.

  • Bye bye.

I want to speak really English from your first lesson.

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A2 boss exhausting emotion exhausted work today terrified

Avoid Common Mistakes: -ING & -ED Adjectives - Basic English Grammar

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/04/13
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