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  • Yes, John, The Scottish government, deeply embarrassed by the revelation its own chief medical officer, breached her own guidance.

  • Visiting her second home twice on two consecutive weekends, Nicholas Sturgeon was pressed today and why she initially backed Catherine, called the Wood before she was forced to resign late last night.

  • The first minister said it wasn't a situation she wanted, and she was deeply sorry.

  • Nikola Sturgeon also confirmed the very sad news that a care worker in Scotland has died off Corona virus.

  • Catherine Sweeney from Dim Barton.

  • Her family said she dedicated over 20 years off her life, serving the most vulnerable in society.

  • Care workers tell us they're worried about peopIe.

  • They're worried about testing.

  • We asked the governments in Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland how many care workers they had tested.

  • Only Northern Island could produce a figure for us, and that is only 162 care workers.

  • Last week we showed you how one care home in Ren Fisher was coping.

  • This is their sobering update.

  • Seven days on next Theo rationally care home we showed you a week ago was filled with energy after life.

  • Today, the corridors are empty residents confined to their rooms.

  • That's all they could do here to try and keep him safe.

  • Theo, workers that rationally have filmed themselves for Channel four news over seven tough days.

  • Come here.

  • They're working the case in which the reality of Corona virus has hit this hope.

  • Any ideas?

  • What?

  • We're gonna go there.

  • Any suspected cases of people isolated in the rooms?

  • Have we got?

  • No, we know have a loving for isolated in the rooms and we have four staff mean personal.

  • So we've just received a delivery or 100 fluid resistant surgical masks.

  • On Thursday, a shipment arrives.

  • So these 6 to 21 but they're actually 2000 and 16 that selected that day a more promising delivery.

  • But it's come from a member of the public.

  • They seem to have her back even though no one else has.

  • So these cane items will come on in really great for the staff and for the distance, keep the Morsi's it's beena scramble, since the government reversed its guidance on wearing masks routinely in care homes this week here can't get what they need.

  • We shouldn't be having to rely on donations That's it doesn't a bit charity.

  • Just know this is a boat.

  • Bought these residents and the staff and lick your state to deserve you.

  • I just feel that she would go away locked down within a lock down.

  • That rationally is hard on 95 year old Jesse.

  • So happy.

  • Last Beach staff members are also so low to limit her exposure to the virus.

  • Deputy Manager Jen is moving it.

  • Uh, I have to for my family.

  • Just about never to go to let him know that I wouldn't be moving in for will be the next two weeks.

  • Anyway, for sure.

  • How do you feel about leaving your family behind?

  • Yes.

  • Say it makes me quite emotional.

  • There's worrying news.

  • Local 16 residents dead at a Glasgow care home.

  • A care worker confirmed dead from the virus nearby days it rationally they've tried to get their care is tested so they can return to work.

  • Have you requested any staff members be tested to get them back in helping you?

  • Yeah, we asked public health if any of our staff would be tasting toe and it wasn't policy.

  • Just know how many care workers have been tested and I don't have that figure right now.

  • As I've said before, we are gathering more data on testing and we intend to make more data available over the course of this week.

  • Not long after some good news and rationally they have exited for kicks in.

  • One member of staff will be tested gnome or group activities.

  • World they're used to is changing.

  • And in that world, the hospital was there for them.

  • If any of the residents need to go to hospital, are you confident that they will get to go there?

  • I'm not confident that will be taken to hospital.

  • Makes me really, really angry because people in our care home are citizens of this country.

  • They deserve the same treatment as an imperial should have access to.

  • And so tonight this is the message from the carers of rationally We need to be tasted.

  • We need to be given peopIe.

  • That's important residence deserves.

  • Let's first after the of this.

  • It's been an absolute shock to Thio feel like this.

  • We were just worth were just very, very sad about the whole thing.

  • The yard.

  • You're gonna stay there and try and keep the show on the road so well done.

  • You Thank you for doing that sort of a now.

  • Earlier, I spoke to three workers from a care home in Surrey, which looks after 38 residents about the challenges facing the care sector.

  • I began by asking what was their most pressing concern in their co home?

  • I think making sure that we are able to keep everybody safe, but it is also quite difficult.

  • We've been a bit work hard this last week or so.

  • Have we managed to get some more kids?

  • But we still don't have as much as we would want to make sure that we can keep everyone safe.

  • It is difficult in a care home to be able to give a balance, because if they are all kept entirely in their rooms and there's no other activities going on, they can't see their families on friends.

  • Things like that, it gets depressing.

  • A depression is a quick way to get yourself into a less good state, and therefore you're more susceptible to illness, so it is important for us to manage those areas effectively.

  • On dhe, we also feel a little bit as a care sector neglected movie Everyone has been focusing entirely rightly on the N hs and how important it is.

  • But we do need to make sure that, bearing in mind something like 400,000 people are being cared for in the sector, a tiny one time that is a huge proportion off the population, probably larger than the actual population of people actually in the hospitals and so on.

  • Sylvia, when we come to your looking after these older people in the home, have you got absolutely all the P P E equipment You need to keep you safe from the Barrys.

  • At the moment, we are site with the number of people in which we got.

  • But of course, because viruses know what, we can't predict what tomorrow brings, Morella.

  • What difference does it make the life of one of the people that you're looking after?

  • That their family can no longer come to see them?

  • How does it change things in their lives?

  • The fact that they consider family make them feel by the press in action.

  • And they regret nervy Asians from us and from the management.

  • Obviously they are asking how long it will take until will manage to receive visitors and when the virus will go.

  • But at the moment we can just over them.

  • As much support as possible and tow.

  • Involve them in the world, one activities to keep them busy.

  • And Ben's depression.

  • Is it very difficult, in some cases to explain to one of your residents or several arm, or why their families air suddenly not coming to see them any more ambitious understand?

  • Especially the residents with Misha understands why nobody's visiting them and sometimes they get pictures and agitate we tried to offer.

  • Is my support responsible?

  • Encouraged families give them home course as much as possible.

  • In fact, they are reassured just you.

  • Their family, voice and deeds is quite reassuring, but more so.

  • I don't understand why we have to make this way's off doing things to protect them and us.

  • But some of them don't have they.

  • Well, thank you very, very much.

  • And congratulations on the job you do, you're It's a difficult conversation about worst case scenarios that none of us ever really want tohave but circumstances and are forcing many of us have if we're elderly or vulnerable and get a bad case of covert 19 How would we want to be treated?

  • How far would we want doctors to go in their attempt to keep us alive?

  • Just a few short weeks, we've watched hospitals being built from scratch at astonishing speeds.

  • But they're still worries that there won't be enough lifesaving equipment through this pandemic that it won't be considered appropriate for some patients.

  • It's the elderly on the vulnerable among us who fear that the most indeed a Jew cases that some older people are being pressurized to sign Deanna's.

  • The instruction do not resuscitate prompting wise that they're being abandoned in the fight against this virus.

  • The charges has a blanket.

  • Decisions about care are shameful, arguing choices must be made on a case by case basis.

  • But some individuals may make their own choice against a stint in the I C.

  • U.

  • If there's little to no hope of them working, then ventilators can be unnecessarily traumatic.

  • And even if a ventilator or CPR keep someone alive, their quality of life could be severely diminished.

  • That's why we're being encouraged to talk through hard decisions ahead of time for ourselves and for those we love.

  • Joining me now from Oxford is Dr Rachel Clark, who has a palliative care specialist as an n HS hospice in Oxford.

  • Thanks for coming on the program.

  • Rachel Clark.

  • We don't really like talking about end of life, but we really have to talk about it these days, don't we?

  • I think we really d'oh on Dhe.

  • That's not to suggest that in any sense, this is an easy conversation.

  • Many of us are very daunted about confronting or talking about our own mortality.

  • It's it's difficult to accept that we are mortal creatures on one day, every single thing that we love, every single person that we love in the world, we are going to be separated from them.

  • That's not easy.

  • And that's even in very calm and placid times, very unlike the tumultuous times we're living through now.

  • But the cost, the risk of not having these difficult conversations with our loved ones is that suddenly you may find yourself or a family member in a in a chaotic, panicked situation because someone is suddenly seriously unwell with Corona virus, and you realize that actually you have no idea what their wishes are, and maybe a doctor or nurse speaks to you from the hospital and says, Do you have any idea what your mom or dad would have wanted?

  • Did they want intensive care?

  • A ventilator?

  • And And you have to say, I have no idea because you didn't have this chat on.

  • I'd suggest that tryingto have these conversations now in advance in the calm of our living rooms, preferably over Skype or some kind of video connection is infinitely better than suddenly them having toe happen in the in the cold heat oven any any admission.

  • You must be witnessing these kind of conversations all the time.

  • You also wrote a book about it called Dear Life.

  • Is there any advice that you can give us as we kind of approach is very difficult situation?

  • Absolutely.

  • I suggest a couple of practical things that the setting is really important.

  • So if you're trying to have this conversation, for instance, with Apparent think about what time of day is best for them, is it best to try and do this in the morning when they have the most energy try and make sure the setting is calm and composed.

  • In an ideal world, you do this face to face you can't, of course, because of social distance, sings they try and make sure you can use a video connection if you can.

  • On DDE use words that a simple don't try to sort of sugar Kotal cover up what you're talking about.

  • You may be very pleasantly surprised you may find that your parent has already thought about this.

  • They're probably reading the same newspapers that you are, so the conversation won't come as a shock.

  • And in my experience and I've had hundreds of these conversations so often, it's actually not a shock to people, and they don't find it.

  • Anything like, as distressing as you might fear you might think, but that by raising this subject, you're going to cause distress.

  • But sometimes it actually comes as a relief to your loved one, because they really you open a swell.

  • Do you find that more more elderly patients as they become ill?

  • And and they face the possibility of going to hospital going on a ventilator, saying, Actually, we didn't want to do this one because it's it's painful and might not work, and I'd rather give my hospital bed up to someone else was younger.

  • Um, I think there's been quite a lot of very fibrillation sensationalist discussion in the media and especially social media about that issue, some very understandable fears that somehow Corona virus is forcing doctors into a position whereby we are rationing treatment on the grounds of age on DDE.

  • That was implied in some of the comments section from age UK there, and I think it's really important to stress that that has never seen the case in the N hs.

  • It's It's not legal to do that.

  • It's not.

  • It's not legal to do that now when we're making decisions about where there are, not somebody would be appropriate for intensive care, a ventilator or resuscitation CPR.

  • It's always made on an individual basis, according to where they're not, This medical intervention is likely to be successful.

  • I came to be in someone's best interest on its It's actually the clinicians decision.

  • It's not the patient's decision and it's one we take incredibly seriously lots of people now.

  • I hate the thought that if they did go to hospital and were seriously unwell, that they would be cut off from their loved ones because, of course, all hospital hospitals at the moment are having to have a really stringent visitor policy on.

  • Actually, some people are thinking you know what?

  • I'm 85.