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  • oh

  • Hello, everyone. Thank you again for showing up, so

  • tonight

  • We're going to finish off the story of Noah and also

  • the story of

  • the Tower of Babel

  • and I don't think that'll take very long and

  • then we're going to

  • turn to the abrahamic Stories and

  • They're a very complex set of stories. They sit between

  • the

  • Earliest stories in Genesis that I would say end with the tower of babel

  • And then the stories of moses which are extraordinarily well-developed

  • Abrahamic stories, there's a whole sequence of them

  • multiple stories

  • conjoined together and

  • There I found them very daunting

  • they're very difficult to understand and

  • so

  • I'm going to stumble through them the best that I can I would say that's that's probably the best way to think about this because

  • they

  • Have a narrative content. That's quite strange

  • I

  • was reading a book while doing this called the disappearance of God that I found quite helpful, and

  • the author of that book argues that

  • one of the things that happens in the old testament is that

  • God is very manifest at the beginning

  • in terms of personal appearances even and then that

  • proclivity fades away as the old testament develops, and there's a

  • parallel development

  • That it's maybe maybe causally linked. I'm not exactly sure how to conceptualize it, but that appears to be causally linked is that?

  • the

  • Stories about individuals become more and more well-developed so it says in it's as if as God fades away, so to speak

  • the individual becomes more and more manifest and

  • There's a statement in the old testament the location of which. I don't recall

  • But I'll tell you about it in future lectures where God essentially tells

  • Whoever he's speaking with and I don't remember who that is that he's going to disappear and let man essentially go his own way

  • And see what happens not a complete disappearance, but maybe a transformations is something that

  • Modern people regard more as a psychological phenomena rather than the sort of objective entity that God seems to be in

  • the beginning of the biblical stories

  • and so I've been wrestling with that a lot because

  • the notion that

  • God, I got appears to Abraham multiple times and

  • that's not a concept that's easy for modern people to

  • to grasp in

  • for us

  • generally speaking apart from say issues of Faith

  • God is it some?

  • thing

  • someone who makes himself personally manifest in our lives

  • He doesn't appear to us

  • That's I suppose why the question of belief is so paramount for modern people

  • I presume that if God had within the habit of appearing to you you likely wouldn't have a problem with belief

  • I mean it might be more complicated than that, but that's how it seems to me, and so when we read stories about

  • God making himself manifest either to a nation say in the case of israel or to individuals

  • It's not easy to understand

  • It's not easy to understand why people would write stories like that if they thought like we thought and I mean it really it wasn't

  • That long ago that the Bible was written say from a biological perspective. It's really only yesterday

  • It's a couple thousand years say four thousand years something like that

  • That's not very long ago from a biological perspective, it's it's nothing

  • so

  • the first thing I tried to do is to

  • see if I could figure out how to understand that and so else the lecture once we finish the the

  • remains of the story of Noah, I'll start the lecture with a with an attempt to

  • Situate the abrahamic stories in a context that might make them more accessible

  • These two contexts that work for me to make them more accessible

  • Let's conclude

  • the Noah Story

  • first however when we

  • ended last time

  • The ark had come to its resting place and Noah and his family had

  • debarked

  • and

  • so this is the stories of

  • What occurs immediately after afterwards?

  • it's a very short story, but I think it's it's very relevant for

  • both

  • Of these stories the tower of babel is well very relevant for our current times and the sons of Noah

  • That went forth of the ark were shem, and ham and Japheth and ham

  • Is the father of Canaan?

  • These are the three sons of Noah and of them was the whole Earth overspread and Noah began to be a husbandman

  • and he planted a vine yard and

  • he drank of the wine and was drunken and he was uncovered within his tent and

  • Ham the father of Canaan saw the nakedness of his father and told his two brethren without?

  • and shem and Japheth took a garment and laid upon both their shoulders and went backward and

  • Covered the nakedness of their father and their faces were backward and they saw not their fathers nakedness

  • And Noah awoke from his wine and knew what his younger son

  • had done unto him and he said curse had to be Canaan a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren and

  • He said blessed shall be the lord. God of shem and Canaan Shall be his servant and God shall enlarge Japheth

  • And he shall dwell in the tents of shem and Canaan Shall be his servant

  • and Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years and all the days of Noah were 950 years and he died and

  • the whole Earth was of one language and of one speech okay, so

  • I remember thinking about this story

  • It's got to be 30 years ago

  • And I think the meaning of the story stood out for me sometimes

  • When you read complicated material sometimes a piece of it will stand out. It's for some reason. It's like it glitters

  • I suppose that might be one way of thinking about it. It's

  • it

  • You're in sync with it, and you can understand what it means. I've really experienced that reading the Dao. De Jing which is document

  • I would really like to do a lecture on at some point because some of the verses

  • I don't understand but others stand right out

  • and I can understand them and I think I understood what this part of the story of Noah meant and I

  • think it means you know we talked a little bit about what nakedness meant in the story of Adam and Eve and

  • The idea essentially was that to know yourself naked is to become aware of your vulnerability

  • the physical Your physical boundaries in time and space and

  • Your your your physiological

  • your fundamental physiological

  • Insufficiencies as they mate might be judged by others, so there's biological

  • Insufficiency that sort of built into you because you're a fragile Mortal vulnerable half insane creature

  • And that's that's just an existential truth, and then of course

  • even

  • merely as a

  • Human being even with all those faults there are faults that you have that are particular to you that might be

  • judged harshly by the group

  • Well might be will definitely be judged

  • Harshly by the group and so to become aware of your nakedness is to become self-conscious and and to and to

  • Know your limits and to know your vulnerability, and that's what is

  • revealed

  • To ham when he comes across his father naked and so the question is

  • What does it mean to see your father naked and it seems to me and especially in an inappropriate Manner like this it it?

  • it's it's it's as if

  • ham

  • He does the same thing that happens in the mesopotamian creation myth

  • When when time out and absolute give rise to the first gods

  • there there the father of the eventual

  • deity of

  • redemption Marduk

  • they're very careless and noisy and they kill apps, ooh their father and

  • attempt to inhabit his corpse and that makes timeout enraged and so she

  • Bursts Forth from The Darkness to

  • To do them in it's like a precursor to the flood story or an analogue to the flood story

  • And I see the same thing happening here with ham. Is that he's is

  • insufficiently respectful of his father and

  • The question is exactly what does the father represent and you can say well there's there's?

  • There's the father that you have and that's a human being that's the demand like other men a man among men

  • but then there's the farther as such and that's the spirit of the father and

  • Insofar as you have a father you have both at the same time you have the personal father

  • That's a man among other men

  • just like anyone others father, but insofar as that man is your father that means that he's something different than just another person and

  • what he is is the

  • incarnation of the spirit of the Father and

  • to see that to take it to what to

  • Disrespect that carelessly, maybe even he's like no one makes a mistake right? He?

  • produces wine and gets himself drunk and you might say well

  • you know if he sprawled out there for everyone to see it's hardly hams fault if he stumbles across them but

  • The book is laying out a danger and the danger is that well maybe you catch your father at

  • his most vulnerable moment and if you're

  • disrespectful

  • Then you transgress against the spirit of the father and if you transgress against the spirit of father and lose

  • Spirit of the father and lose respect for the spirit of the father then that is likely to transform you into a slave

  • That's a very interesting idea and I think it's particularly interesting

  • Maybe not particularly interesting, but it's it's particularly germane. I think to our current cultural situation because I think that

  • We're pushed constantly to see the nakedness of our father so to speak

  • because of the intense criticism, that's

  • Directed towards our culture and the patriarch of culture, so to speak

  • we're constantly exposing its weaknesses and vulnerabilities and let's say nakedness and

  • There's nothing wrong with criticism, but the thing about Criticism is the purpose of criticism is to separate the wheat from the chaff

  • It's not to burn everything to the ground

  • Right, it's to say well. We're going to carefully look at this we're going to carefully differentiate

  • We're going to keep what's good and we're going to move away from what's bad

  • But the point of the Criticism isn't to identify everything is bad. It's to

  • Separate what's good from what's bad so that you can retain. What's good and move towards it and

  • And to be careless at that is deadly because you're inhabited by the spirit of the father right insofar as you're a cultural

  • Construction which of course is something that the that the postmodern neo-Marxists are absolutely?

  • emphatic about you're a cultural construction insofar as you're a cultural construction, then you're inhabited by the spirit of the father and to be

  • Disrespectful towards that