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  • Sugar is playing hide and seek with you.

  • You'd think it would be pretty easy for you to win,

  • considering all the sugar in

  • sodas, ice cream, candy, and big white bags labeled sugar.

  • People get about half of their added sugars

  • from those drinks and treats,

  • so it might seem like sugar is hiding in plain sight,

  • but like someone in the witness protection program,

  • the other half is hidden in places you'd least suspect.

  • Check the ingredients on ketchup, bologna,

  • spaghetti sauce, soy milk, sports drinks,

  • fish sticks, and peanut butter.

  • You'll find sugar hiding in most of those products.

  • In fact, you'll find added sugars

  • in three-quarters of the more than 600,000 items

  • available in grocery stores.

  • But how is sugar hiding?

  • Can't you just look on food labels?

  • It's not that easy.

  • Just like your friend Robert

  • might go by Bob, Robby, Rob, Bobby, or Roberto,

  • added sugar has a lot of aliases.

  • And by a lot, we don't mean five or six,

  • try fifty-six.

  • There's brown rice syrup, barley malt,

  • demerara, Florida Crystals, muscovado,

  • and, of course, high fructose corn syrup,

  • sometimes called HFCS, or corn sugar.

  • Even sugar's tricky nicknames have nicknames.

  • Grape or apple concentrate has the same effects on your body

  • as its 55 sugary twins.

  • And even though organic evaporated cane juice sounds healthy,

  • when you evaporate it,

  • you get sugar!

  • Chemically speaking, it's all the same.

  • And even trickier,

  • when multiple added types of sugars are used in one type of product,

  • they get buried down in a long list of ingredients,

  • so the sugar content might appear to be okay,

  • but when you add them all together,

  • sugar can be the single biggest ingredient.

  • Currently, the FDA doesn't suggest

  • a recommended daily limit for sugar,

  • so it's hard to tell if this 65 grams in a bottle of soda

  • is a little or a lot.

  • But the World Health Organization recommends

  • limiting sugar to just 5% of your total calories,

  • or about 25 grams per day.

  • So, 65 grams is well over twice that amount.

  • But just what is sugar?

  • What's the difference between glucose and fructose?

  • Well, both are carbohydrates

  • with the same chemical composition

  • of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen.

  • But they have very different structures

  • and behave quite differently in our bodies.

  • Glucose is the best source of energy for nearly all organisms on Earth.

  • It can be metabolized by all organs in the body.

  • Fructose, on the other hand, is metabolized primarily in the liver,

  • and when your liver gets overloaded with sweet, sweet fructose,

  • the excess is metabolized to fat.

  • Fresh fruits actually contain fructose,

  • but it's naturally occurring

  • and doesn't cause an overload

  • because the fiber in fruit slows its absorption.

  • This gives your liver the time it needs to do its job.

  • It's sugar that makes cookies chewy

  • and candy crunchy.

  • It even turns bread crust a beautiful, golden brown.

  • It's also a great preservative;

  • it doesn't spoil or evaporate,

  • so the foods it's added to are easier to store and ship long distances

  • and tend to be cheaper.

  • That's why sugar is hiding everywhere.

  • Actually, it might be easier to list the foods that added sugar isn't hiding in,

  • things like: vegetables, eggs, meats,

  • fish, fruit, raw nuts, even your kitchen sink.

  • Simply choosing water over soda, juices, and sports drinks

  • is a great way to avoid hidden added sugar.

  • At the very least, try to pay attention to food labels,

  • so you can keep your sugar intake at a healthy level.

  • Because in this game of hide and seek,

  • every time you don't find added sugar,

  • you win!

Sugar is playing hide and seek with you.

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B2 US TED-Ed fructose added hiding liver plain sight

【TED-Ed】Sugar: Hiding in plain sight - Robert Lustig

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    Sofi posted on 2014/06/29
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