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  • Hi, everybody.

  • Welcome back to ask Alicia the weekly Siri's where you ask me questions and I answer them.

  • Maybe first question this week comes from a new Rog.

  • Pratap Singh, high on rug on a rug says, Hey, Alicia, this is un Rajan, India.

  • Hello.

  • Could you please tell me the use of these types of Mark's question Mark exclamation point and so on?

  • Used in combination together?

  • Could you give some examples?

  • Take care?

  • Yeah.

  • Thes combinations of question marks and exclamation points are used in very casual messages like text messages or on social media Or maybe in very casual e mails.

  • So we use thes together like a question mark in an exclamation point together when we want to express surprise and shock and a question all at the same time.

  • So some mixture of those feelings So some examples of when you might use this could be you forgot my wedding rings on my wedding day or you crashed my car.

  • So in those kinds of situations, you want to communicate like shock or really strong anger, and you want to ask a question.

  • So in those cases we combine our exclamation point with a question mark.

  • So it doesn't matter if you use exclamation point question mark or the reverse, you can choose the order that you like.

  • Some people also choose, for example, to use like exclamation, exclamation, exclamation question.

  • Or maybe they do question, question, question, exclamation, That's up to you.

  • So they do that for emphasis.

  • They feel I want to emphasize the question part more, or I want to emphasize the shock or surprise more.

  • So that's up to you.

  • But just keep in mind that this is very casual.

  • This is not something that's officially recognized and style guides.

  • It's not something that you typically see in like a professionally edited book or in a magazine.

  • It's used in very casual situations, but this is very common.

  • So if you want to communicate a question and some kind of shock or surprise or other extreme feeling, you can use thes two marks together.

  • So I hope that that helps you.

  • Thanks very much for the question.

  • Okay, let's move along to your next question.

  • Next question comes from Peter.

  • Hi, Peter, Peter says, Hi, I have two questions.

  • Okay, first, what's the difference between replace with and replaced by For example, one people replaced computers by phones.

  • Two people replaced computers with phones.

  • Three computers are being replaced by or with phones.

  • Okay, let's stop here.

  • Let's start with your first question.

  • Then we use replace with when we're talking about getting a substitute for something that is old for something that is broken for something that just requires an upgrade.

  • I replaced my old iPhone with a new iPhone, or we replaced our TV with a projector screen.

  • So in each of those example situations, something old or maybe something that needed an upgrade got replaced with something new.

  • So we use replaced with or to replace with.

  • In these cases, when that something is like old or broken, we use replace by when something is filling the role of another thing.

  • So this is commonly used when people change their jobs or they change their position in some way in society.

  • So when we use a pattern like person, A was replaced by person be it means person a went away and person be took person A's place.

  • The president was replaced by the vice president after the scandal.

  • Company managers have been replaced by robots, so in both of these example sentences.

  • We see one person or a group of people being replaced by something else.

  • So that means this something else is taking the position or is taking the role of the person or people mentioned at the beginning of the sentence.

  • So this is the difference with replace with or replaced by your final example.

  • Sentence was kind of interesting.

  • It was.

  • Computers are being replaced by or with phones, so it kind of depends on the new ones that you want to give here.

  • I personally would use.

  • Computers are being replaced by phones because I feel that that kind of communicates that the role of the computer can be done by a phone now.

  • So maybe, like a very old computer can do the same things that a new phone can do.

  • So we could suggest that a phone can do those things.

  • A phone can be in the role of an old computer, so I think I would probably use by.

  • In this case, computers can be replaced, buy phones or computers are being replaced.

  • Buy phones, as in your example sentence.

  • So thanks very much for that question.

  • Let's go on to the second part of your question, which waas, which is correct or is more natural.

  • For example, people replaced their computer by a phone.

  • People replace their computers by phones.

  • You should send an email through the G mail app.

  • You should send e mails through the Gmail app.

  • Okay, good question.

  • And the answer really depends on the goal of your communication in general, when you're trying to decide between using the singular and the plural form.

  • In cases like these, if you're speaking, generally used the plural form.

  • So to go back to your example sentence people are replacing computers with phones would be correct or send e mails using the G mail app.

  • So, using the sentence, send an email with the Gmail APP would be okay.

  • If you are talking about one specific email case like you need to email your client, why don't you send an email with the Gmail app like tested out?

  • Try it out one time.

  • If you're talking about a company rule, though, send e mails meaning all of your e mails.

  • Please send all of your e mails with the G mail.

  • So using the singular means one time using the plural form means generally speaking, send emails.

  • So I hope that this helps you understand the differences between using the plural and the singular form in these cases.

  • Thanks very much for the question.

  • Okay, let's move on to your next question.

  • Next question comes from Mohamed al Daily.

  • Hey Mohamed!

  • Mohamed says transistors proved vital in creating the practical lasers.

  • If I want to translate the verb proved here, would it be correct?

  • Toe, Understand it as meaning tested?

  • Or are there other possibilities?

  • Great question.

  • Yeah, the verb to prove means to show evidence for something, or to show evidence that something is true.

  • So another way to say this part of the sentence this transistors proved vital.

  • Would be transistors were shown to be vital.

  • Or like we learned that transistors were vital.

  • So vital means very important, and transistors refers to a part of a machine.

  • So that's not so important for understanding the focus of this question.

  • The verb prove so proved doesn't really mean test.

  • No, to answer your question, although it is used in test situations.

  • So in testing situations, or like in experiment situations, or when you're trying something new you need to test things.

  • And ultimately, in the end, you want to prove something to show evidence for something.

  • So if you're doing an experiment, you want to explain the results of your experiments.

  • So what did you learn?

  • You can use the verb prove in cases like these, for example, the new software proved useful for a project.

  • Our new lessons proved popular among students, so in these sentences, proved means was shown to be or were shown to be so.

  • In the first example sentenced.

  • The new software proved useful for our project means the new software was shown to be useful, or we learned that the new software was useful for our project.

  • In the second example, sentence about classes proving popular among students proved there again means shown to be so our new classes were shown to be popular among students, or we learned that our new classes were popular among students.

  • So this is what prove is used to do.

  • Keep in mind, though, that this use of proof tends to sound a little bit more formal.

  • We don't use this so much in everyday speech.

  • You may hear it from time to time, but using prove in this way makes your speech sound a little more business like so I hope that this helps you with your understanding of the verb proof.

  • Thanks very much for the question.

  • Okay, let's move on to your next question.

  • Next question comes from Dan.

  • Ooh, hello again, Daniel, Daniel says.

  • Hi, Alicia.

  • What's the difference between to get yourself killed and to kill yourself?

  • Oh, man, this is a great question.

  • If it's a little bit on the dark side, let's start with.

  • Get yourself killed to get yourself killed.

  • Refers to dying because you put yourself in a situation with a high risk of death.

  • So the death comes from outside you.

  • Something else kills you in this situation, another person or maybe a natural disaster.

  • Something from outside you kills you.

  • That's very bad.

  • So to get yourself killed means you put yourself in a situation where there was a high risk of death occurring.

  • Some examples Don't take the boat out in this storm.

  • You're gonna get yourself killed.

  • Or if you're a character in an action movie, don't go alone.

  • You'll get yourself killed.

  • So in this situation, get yourself killed means something from outside.

  • Your body is going to kill you in the first example.

  • Situation.

  • It's a storm, and the advice is, don't take the boat out in the storm.

  • You'll get yourself killed, meaning the bad weather may cause you to die.

  • It's a high risk situation in the second example sentence from something like an action movie.

  • Don't go alone.

  • You'll get yourself killed.

  • Means if you go by yourself, there's a high risk of death.

  • You may die.

  • So let's compare this then to the expression kill oneself or in your example, to kill yourself.

  • To kill yourself means to take your own life.

  • So that means to use something in order to end your own life.

  • So this is a very dark expression.

  • Yes, this is commonly referred to as suicide, so this verb is used reflexively.

  • Or rather, this expression is used reflexively.

  • This means that the subject and the object of the verb are the same.

  • For example, he kills himself.

  • So he is the subject and himself is the object.

  • Kill is the verb.

  • That means he is causing himself to die.

  • So this verb is reflexively used here.

  • This is kind of a dark one to make some example sentences about.

  • But let's take a look at a couple.

  • If you're having thoughts about killing yourself, please reach out for help.

  • And he killed himself due to high stress in his life.

  • So, in sum, this is the difference between to get yourself killed and to kill yourself.

  • To get yourself killed refers to being in a situation that has a high risk of death and to kill oneself refers to taking one's own life.

  • So I hope that this helps you understand this.

  • Thanks very much for the question.

  • Okay, let's move on to your next question.

  • Next question comes from a new rock high again on Iraq.

  • Go.

  • I have two questions from you on this one.

  • Okay, on, Rog says I Alicia, could you please tell me the difference between supposed to and supposed to and their pronunciation while speaking?

  • Do we have to use the e d sound while saying, supposed to in sentences?

  • Yeah, good question.

  • And the difference between supposed to and supposed two is that supposed to does not exist?