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  • Hi, everybody.

  • Welcome back to top words.

  • My name is Alicia and today we're gonna talk about 10 phrase a ll verbs for business.

  • So let's go step up the first phrase over biz Step up.

  • Step up means to move up or tow level up, usually to some kind of new, challenging position or to a challenging project.

  • So I want to step up and do more for my company or I want to step up and take on this project.

  • There's a nuance of a challenge, a move upward, a promotion, perhaps, and new challenges, new responsibilities.

  • So, in a sentence, the new CEO really stepped up on this project.

  • Great.

  • Step down.

  • The next word is the opposite.

  • Step down.

  • To step down often means to resign or to quit one's job, especially at the higher levels of business, so a CEO might step down from his position or her position if they've made a big mistake or if the company has had problems.

  • Eso Sometimes this can mean resign.

  • Sometimes this means just, ah, moving to a lower position in the company you can.

  • You'll have to look into the specifics of the situation to figure out exactly the meaning.

  • But step down means to goto a position off lower responsibility.

  • So, in a sentence, following multiple serious mistakes, the government officials stepped down measure up.

  • The next expression is measure up.

  • Measure up is a word or a phrase over.

  • But we used to mean compare.

  • Ah, we say, How does something measure up?

  • Or does this measure up to meaning is item a equal to item B?

  • Is item a better than item B?

  • This is a question or a word that we use to ask how one thing compares to another thing.

  • So, like, how does candidate a measure up to Candidate B is a question of comparison between these two, these two items or does this project measure up to our past work?

  • In other words, is this project equal to Or is it a comparable to our past works?

  • So measure up is used when comparing two things.

  • So in a sentence, how is the new plan?

  • Measure up to our past ideas?

  • Step aside, the next expression we've talked about.

  • Step up, step down.

  • Now we'll talk about step aside, so step aside means to move out of the way.

  • It doesn't mean necessarily to move up in in position or to move down in position.

  • But step aside means just temporarily to remove someone or to remove yourself from a situation so you can use this not just in business, but maybe in a very crowded space.

  • Like let's step aside and have this discussion.

  • You can use that in a business meeting as well.

  • To step aside is to remove yourself from the main group or from one situation.

  • Go away from that situation temporarily.

  • That's how we use step aside.

  • So in a sentence the company feels you should step aside like please move away from this project.

  • Swoop in.

  • The next expression is swoop in, swoop in, so we use swoop, for example, with birds, we could say the birds swooped in, but in a business situation.

  • It's somebody, usually someone, a person or maybe a team that suddenly joins the company or suddenly joins a project and maybe makes a lot of changes.

  • So, for example, ah ah consulting firm might swoop into a situation or might swoop into a project.

  • Or maybe the boss swooped into the meeting and made a lot of changes.

  • So these, uh, these sentences these air situations, where something suddenly happens by one person or by a group of people.

  • In another sentence, the consultants swooped in and changed around our entire organization.

  • Shake up the next phrase over biz.

  • Shake up Shake up means to make a lot of changes at one time, or to maybe change and atmosphere, or to change a company.

  • Feeling This can also be applied to situations outside of work, like maybe ah, art, for example, other industries manufacturing industry.

  • It means to make changes for so one person or one group makes changes.

  • So you could say, for example, Apple shook up the smartphone industry when it introduced the iPhone, so it means to make changes or to bring about a new change in a sentence.

  • She really shook up our department with her innovative ideas.

  • Come on line.

  • Ah, the next expression is Come online, come online.

  • So this is interesting.

  • Of course you're watching this video, presumably probably on the Internet online right now, but the expression come online means become able to use something usually publicly or at least within your company.

  • So when a new project comes online, it means it's it's now available.

  • It can be used or it can be purchased.

  • We typically use this expression for some kind of service.

  • So, for example, a Web platform or, um, an application or something that other people can use.

  • So come on line means become available.

  • Come online means become available in a sentence.

  • Then our news service is going to come on line at the end of the month.

  • Expand into the next expression is expand into expand into so we can use expand into two mean moving more or moving to another place or to another industry with your business operations s so we can use perhaps a country or region after this expression, or we can use an industry name after this expression, so you can say we want to expand into China.

  • We want to expand into Japan with our business.

  • Or you can say we want to expand into the electronics industry.

  • We want to expand into the service industry, expanding into something, talks about the direction you want your company to move in, band into so in a sentence, we'd like to expand into some other markets to bring about.

  • The next expression is to bring about to bring about means to make something happen, to cause something to happen.

  • We often use this to talk about change can be positive or it can be negative.

  • I feel I tend to use this more in a positive situation, but that might just be me.

  • Um so to bring about means to cause something or yet to make something happen in a sentence.

  • Don't you think we should try to bring about change in our company?

  • Take on.

  • The next expression is take on.

  • So take on If you if you can kind of make a visual with this phrase will verb, you can take something and attach it to yourself to take on something.

  • But this thing you're taking is responsibility.

  • So to take on something has the nuance of a challenge or a new responsibility.

  • It's something that is generally seen as positive but perhaps could be maybe a lot of new work or a big new project.

  • For example, s O.

  • I might say I want to take on some new projects this year or you could use it outside of business, like in a kind of aggressive situation.

  • Like Like I tried to take on a really big guy at the club, but he punched me so you could use this to, But it has the nuance of challenge every every time you use it.

  • So in a different sentence, I was asked to take on more responsibilities at the office.

  • Oh, that's the end.

  • So those are 10 phrase a ll verbs for business.

  • I hope that those air useful for you if they are, please let us know in the comments.

  • If you have any questions also, please let us know they're too.

  • If you haven't already, please make sure to like this video and subscribe to our channel.

  • Also check us out in English Class 101 dot com for more good stuff.

  • Thank you very much for watching this episode of top boards and we will see you again soon looking.

  • But Usher talked 121 dot way Talk about Usher lyrics have been analyzed them far too much.

  • Yeah, It's an old song, isn't it?

  • Yeah, but I like, yeah.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • And welcome back to top words.

  • My name is Alicia and today we're gonna talk about 10 crime related words, So let's begin.

  • Suspect.

  • The first word is suspect.

  • Suspect as a noun.

  • Please be careful.

  • Not the verb form to suspect, though we can use that suspect and suspect have slightly different pronunciations as a noun suspect means a person who may or may not have committed a crime may or may not have done something bad to suspect someone means to be suspicious, to think they may or may not have done something.

  • So please be careful.

  • Depending on the grammar, suspect and suspect have different pronunciations.

  • Despite the same spelling so suspect in a sentence, the suspect was seen running away from the scene criminal.

  • The next expression is criminal.

  • So a criminal is a person who is convicted of a crime.

  • So to put that more simply, a criminal is a person who has been determined to have done something against the law.

  • They have done something bad.

  • It has been decided by a court of law or the governing body.

  • So a criminal has indeed yes.

  • Been found guilty on expression.

  • We'll talk about later.

  • So a criminal is someone we know has committed a crime in a sentence.

  • They arrested the criminal on Wednesday.

  • Victim The next expression is victim Victim.

  • A victim is a person who suffers because of a crime or because of a natural disaster.

  • Also, we can use victims for natural disasters and for crime.

  • So they're innocent.

  • They are They've had no reason to be affected.

  • There just may be the wrong place, the wrong time.

  • Either way, they're well.

  • I shouldn't say innocent, but they're the person who suffers in this situation.

  • A victim is the person who suffers in this situation In a sentence, the victim was an elderly woman Guilty.

  • So the next expression is guilty.

  • He is guilty of blah, blah, blah crime Or he was found guilty of global blood crime.

  • The nuance of guilty is having done something bad, eh?

  • So if you are guilty of a crime, it means you have done that crime.

  • But someone can look guilty.

  • We can use guilty as an adjective to talk about the way someone looks so guilty in a court or guilty in discussing a criminal case can mean he or she did the crime.

  • He is guilty.

  • She is guilty.

  • However, we can't say he looks guilty or the dog looks guilty.

  • That means that that person or that object to that animal looks like they did something bad.

  • But we don't know for sure.

  • So guilty means has the nuance of doing something.

  • Matt, in a sentence.

  • You look very guilty.