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  • We all know our time here is limited.

  • But we don't know by how much.

  • Are we better off not knowing when we'll die?

  • Or would a countdown help us all

  • to lead happier and more fulfilling lives?

  • What if you knew

  • exactly when you were going to die?

  • What would you change about the way you live?

  • It's not a cheery subject.

  • Not too many people like to talk about it.

  • Not too many people like to think about it.

  • Some people joke about it, but,

  • that doesn't make it any easier.

  • Death!

  • There, I said it.

  • It's scary, but it also rouses our curiosity.

  • "You guys really are dead!"

  • We all know we're gonna go, but,

  • we don't know where we're going,

  • and we don't know when!

  • These unknowns

  • are the source of a lot of anxiety.

  • "Do you fear death?"

  • But should they be?

  • What if knowing the future date and time

  • of our deaths actually helped us...

  • how should I say this...

  • rest in peace?

  • Despite the fact that

  • a lot of people around the world

  • suffer from thanatophobia,

  • a technical term for the fear of dying,

  • there are several compelling reasons why

  • knowing when you're going to die

  • is better than not knowing.

  • In a series of research studies, psychologists

  • asked people with terminal illnesses,

  • and inmates on death row,

  • to reflect on life,

  • knowing that theirs would soon be over.

  • They then asked a separate group of people

  • to imagine what it would be like

  • if they knew they were going to die.

  • In every study, those who knew

  • they were about to die

  • spoke more positively about life and death

  • compared to those who presumably

  • had a lot longer to live.

  • The people who didn't know

  • when they were going to die

  • found it harder not to think about the negatives:

  • feelings of loss, meaninglessness, and,

  • missing out on all the things

  • they didn't get to see or do.

  • But the group who knew

  • exactly how much time they had left

  • found peace in reflecting

  • on their life's experiences and accomplishments.

  • They appreciated their family and close friends,

  • and the happy memories they'd

  • accumulated over their lifetime.

  • But imminent death isn't just a time to reflect.

  • For many people, it confirms that

  • we should all live life to the fullest!

  • Once we know

  • how little time we actually have left,

  • truisms like, "you only live once,"

  • wouldn't sound like clichés.

  • You'd want to use your time effectively,

  • doing the things that mattered most to you.

  • And depending on your bucket list,

  • the sky is the limit!

  • Would you leap from the edge of space?

  • Or plunge to the deepest parts of the ocean?

  • Would you endeavor to see

  • as much of the world as possible?

  • Would you seek out new flavors,

  • or intense thrills to remind you

  • of what it means to be alive?

  • Or is life simpler than that?

  • Maybe you'd choose to spend

  • more time with family and close friends.

  • Maybe you'd tell someone special

  • how they really make you feel.

  • "You complete me."

  • The possibilities and combinations

  • are endless,

  • and almost unique to

  • every person on this planet.

  • But you know that some people

  • would still strive to live beyond their time.

  • It's estimated that roughly 1,000 young women

  • move to Hollywood every month

  • to try their luck at becoming a star.

  • To a lot of people,

  • this might sound like an act of pure naiveté,

  • or glaring vanity. But,

  • research suggests that the drive for fame

  • is a little deeper than that.

  • For those who have a hard time

  • coping with their mortality,

  • becoming famous or

  • having a legacy is comforting,

  • knowing that their name and reputation

  • will live on in the world, even after they're gone.

  • Of course, there are also plenty of examples

  • of people who, facing imminent death,

  • have used their remaining time

  • to champion important issues

  • and inspire positive change.

  • But whether you think

  • you'd choose to become an activist,

  • a star, a daredevil, or at one with nature,

  • the important takeaway is:

  • start living!

  • You don't need to know how much time is left

  • to start thinking about what it is you want to do,

  • and to go out there and do it!

  • But if you think knowing would help,

  • scientists have had some success

  • predicting the probability of your death by

  • looking at various markers in your blood.

  • AI is also getting good at

  • determining the length of your lifespan.

  • The idea that we all die someday

  • is undoubtedly scary, but,

  • as Edward Abbey once wrote,

  • "The fear of death follows from

  • the fear of life.

  • One who lives life fully

  • is prepared to die at any time.”

  • So start ticking off the items

  • on your bucket list,

  • remember that love and kindness

  • go a long way,

  • think of ways you can

  • make the world a better place

  • and take on the challenge!

  • Make the most of your time because,

  • life is short.

  • And unpleasant as that may seem,

  • isn't it for the best?

  • Well, could you imagine what

  • the world would be like if nobody died?

  • That's a story for another WHAT IF.

We all know our time here is limited.

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B1 die death knowing people life fear

What If You Knew the Date and Time You Will Die?

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/04/04
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