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  • [APPLAUSE]

  • Yo, yo, yo, yo.

  • What's happening?

  • Welcome to the show.

  • Yeah, let me get everybody's name.

  • will.i.am.

  • What's up, y'all.

  • This Taboo Nawasha.

  • This apl.de.ap.

  • Kim Hill, featured vocalist.

  • All right.

  • How would you describe the whole Black Eyed Peas

  • musical concept?

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Yeah, they got rid of the black girl

  • that they never made a part of the band,

  • and then they got the white girl.

  • They made her a part, and they blew up.

  • It's like, no, that's not how it happened.

  • L.A. in the '90s —

  • there was so much tension in Los Angeles.

  • The narratives of hip-hop got to be far more violent,

  • bitches and hoes.

  • The subject matter typically came down to a woman

  • hoing herself for a ride home.

  • The damage that comes from the incessant, repetitive,

  • mindless violence that permeates our media

  • all the time

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • By now, you've got Dre and Pac.

  • They were really speaking the truth.

  • Their friends were drug dealers or pimps.

  • This was real stuff.

  • It was still jarring, though.

  • [GUNSHOTS]

  • A lot of the music in the rap, it was very degrading.

  • And my 20-year-old self knew that it was degrading,

  • but the beats were so crazy and when you walked

  • in the club and it's like (RAPPING) 1, 2,

  • 3 and to the 4, (SPEAKING) you're like I —

  • everybody, you know.

  • And you listen to the lyrics, you're like,

  • well, I know I'm not a bitch, so he can't be talking to me.

  • I grew up in Syracuse, New York.

  • My first memory of music,

  • I just would sit in front of the TV whenSoul Trainwas on,

  • it was like, I'm here for every bit of it.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Best part ofSoul Trainwas the Soul Train line.

  • Then another segment of the show

  • where there was at least one act

  • so it could be Elton John, David Bowie, Stevie Wonder.

  • I want to get onSoul Train.”

  • That was the coolest show to be on.

  • My mother was a single mom.

  • Yet my life was privileged.

  • We were black kids growing up in the white suburbs,

  • so I always kind of code switched kind of right

  • in the middle of those two worlds,

  • praying that those two worlds would never collide.

  • And I remember my 16th birthday,

  • and my mother was like, we can't have two parties.

  • So what are we going to do?

  • I remember being terrified.

  • I was hiding out at my own party.

  • I didn't want my black friends to be like

  • why you talking like that and my white friends

  • to be like who's that?

  • My mother — I was talking, and I was telling her a story.

  • And it was very much like and you know and like

  • and I don't even likemy mom would stop.

  • Where's your voice?

  • Where are you?

  • Syracuse did not have black radio.

  • We didn't have access to it.

  • I always wanted that space to write music

  • from my vantage point.

  • So I'm moving to L.A. to get a record deal.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Oh, shit.

  • It has to work out.

  • Although I needed like food and whatever else, I was like,

  • I'm taking head shots.

  • Getting on a bus at 4:00 in the morning

  • when it's pitch black dark from Culver City to deep

  • in the valley

  • deep valley — I took head shots, and it was like,

  • I started working.

  • Now let's go to work.

  • Fine.

  • I landed on "Living Single," whatever the shows were.

  • You get your 50 bucks, and people would see these shows where

  • I was walking around as a background actor, extra,

  • and they'd be like, you made it.

  • I'm like, I didn't eat.

  • I had a showcase for BMI.

  • I get on stage, and I do my thing.

  • This kid walks up, and he's like, I

  • think you really dope.

  • We should write music together.

  • Just the mostjust a little precious little somebody.

  • So I was like, where's your mom?

  • Oh, my name is will.i.am, and,

  • I'm Taboo Nawasha.

  • I'm apl.de.ap.

  • We're the Black Eyed Peas.

  • Like the food?

  • Oh.

  • Will had a few songs set to play for me,

  • and the first one he played I was like, I love it.

  • I saw that discipline and the ideas that came out of him.

  • I was like, oh, shit.

  • Let me get myhold on.

  • Let me sharpen my pencil.

  • And so I immediately had respect for him,

  • and I started writing something.

  • And this wasthe hook was like (SINGING) every day

  • and all night, I dream of holding you tight.

  • (SINGING) Crazy as it may seem,

  • you're all that I ever need, baby.

  • Something in the way you make me feel.

  • (RAPPING) You got me feeling like I'm supposed to feel.

  • (SINGING) Feel.

  • (RAPPING) You got me feeling like I'm supposed to feel.

  • (SINGING) Feel.

  • [MUSIC FADING]

  • That wasit was enhanced by us having this,

  • like, big sister, little brother kind of thing.

  • You're one of us.

  • You're coming along on this ride with us.

  • [INAUDIBLE] love and kisses, we'd like to say thank you

  • to the Black Eyed Peas for being on the tour.

  • Making this music and people were buying it.

  • We're selling out small venues,

  • and we're opening for everybody from Eminem

  • and No Doubt to OutKast.

  • We kinda couldn't believe that our brand of hip-hop

  • was being embraced.

  • Hip-hop is progressive.

  • It started to regress at one point in time.

  • So we took it in our duties to progress it again.

  • We were happy at a time in hip-hop

  • where it really wasn't O.K. to just be happy.

  • This whole L.A. underground movement,

  • they really loved us.

  • I did not feel like there would

  • be pressure to be anybody other than myself.

  • (RAPPING) My name is apl.de.ap.

  • (RAPPING) My name is Taboo Nawasha.

  • (RAPPING) My name is will.i.am.

  • (RAPPING) And we the Black Eyed Peas.

  • That's the joint.

  • That's the jam.

  • Turn it up and play it again.

  • But these three, we rock the House of Blues,

  • and then they got to go back to East L.A.

  • with gangs and uncles in jail.

  • And I was in my two-bedroom apartment

  • with my quirky roommate living in Hollywood,

  • like, looking at a hair magazine.

  • Let meif I put enough coconut oil on my ends,

  • I can shake it out, and it's all crinkly.

  • Like, you know.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • From right here in Los Angeles,

  • let's meet a mad magnificent rap

  • crew as they join us to do their latest single.

  • The song on the Interscope label's titled

  • "Joints and Jams."

  • They're known as Black Eyed Peas.

  • When we were asked toSoul Train,” I was pinching

  • myself.

  • Wow.

  • (SINGING) [INAUDIBLE]

  • People onSoul Trainwould lip sync.

  • (RAPPING) That's the jam.

  • Turn it up, and play it again.