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  • So today in front of me I have a fully functional, clear, Nintendo Switch.

  • All of the housing on the back and the front have been changed into clear plastic.

  • Looks pretty sweet.

  • There are a couple videos on YouTube showing kind of the same thing, but none of them are

  • super detailed on how to accomplish this process.

  • I'll be selling these kits down in the video description, right below this video.

  • There are a couple different colors, not only clear, there's atomic purple, there's green,

  • there's red...all of them transparent, which is exactly what we're trying to accomplish.

  • Remember though, as with all of these projects, you attempt this at your own risk.

  • I would say if you're serious about this, make sure you watch the video all the way

  • through from start to finish to make sure it's something that you can actually accomplish.

  • If you know what you're doing with a screw driver though, and you're good at organizing

  • your screws, everything should come out fine.

  • Let's get started.

  • [Intro]

  • I'm going to start with the left joy-con since both joy-cons are slightly different.

  • Then I'll show the right joy-con and end up with the console itself.

  • At the end I'll have a successful, fully functioning, clear Nintendo Switch to play after I'm all

  • done.

  • This whole process took me about an hour to accomplish, so go slow and keep your screws

  • organized.

  • There are 4 tri-point screws along the back of the left joy-con.

  • I'll have all the tools and stuff linked with the clear shells in the video description.

  • Then the whole plastic back unsnaps from the front and folds open.

  • Be careful not to stress those ribbon cables along the sides, if you rip those, your controllers

  • will not doc or charge anymore.

  • The 525 milliamp hour battery comes out next; no adhesive or anything holding it down.

  • It just has it's own little plastic holder.

  • There are two thin wires going down to the plug on the motherboard.

  • I pulled mine out pretty gently because once again, this is a fragile process and I don't

  • want to break anything.

  • There are 3 more screws holding down the plastic battery holder, I'll unscrew those and unlatch

  • the ribbon for the trigger button.

  • Then I'll also disconnect the joy-con rail ribbons.

  • Each of these have their own locking flap as well, but the latches are different for

  • each ribbon, so watch out for that.

  • Luckily there's only one screw holding the rail in place.

  • So I'll remove that and set it off to the side, and pull out the little black latching

  • button that allows the rails to disconnect from the switch body.

  • While I have the button here, I'll toss it into the clear counterpart.

  • It has a little notch on one side so it will only fit in the correct way.

  • I'll set the joy-con rail into place along that same clear plastic piece, with it's one

  • little screw.

  • And we're donewith the first part anyway.

  • Now the left trigger is a little bit of a pain to disconnect and even more so to reconnect,

  • but I'll walk you through it.

  • There's a little plastic pin that needs to be decompressed underneath the trigger so

  • that it will let go of the black plastic.

  • I'll press that in and then grab the trigger.

  • There are 2 squirrelly little springs that are here that you're going to hate in a few

  • seconds.

  • So keep track of them for now.

  • The electronic trigger switch is held down by one screw.

  • I'll remove that and very gently transfer it over onto the clear counterpart.

  • Remember, never bend, kink, or tear these ribbon cables; they are very fragile.

  • There is one Phillips screw holding that button in place, and then I'll put the two little

  • springs over the circular guiding pegs on either side of that tiny board, before trying

  • to get the trigger button and top over them.

  • The trigger has it's own pegs for the springs.

  • It's tough to keep the spring straight and get the trigger clipped in at the same time.

  • But, it's a good idea to make sure it's done correctly the first time so you won't have

  • to come back and fix it later.

  • It can be done.

  • The rest of this joy-con body is pretty straightforward.

  • The joystick is going to come out next.

  • Pretty simple construction with two screws on either corner of the square body and then

  • one little ribbon connector attached to the motherboard.

  • This also has a black locking latch that needs to be lifted up before the joystick can come

  • out.

  • Up at the top of the board we have 3 more screws.

  • These screws hold the boards tight for the top buttons.

  • They'll come out as one piece after the ribbon cables detach from the larger motherboard

  • below it.

  • The top L button can come off at this point too.

  • Notice that it also has a spring attached to it.

  • This is easier to work with, but still, don't lose it.

  • Grab the little minus button from the controller, along with it's inner rubber cushion and set

  • those off to the side in an organized fashion.

  • There are only two screws left holding this motherboard in place.

  • Remove those and the motherboard comes loose.

  • Now you can disconnect the rumble pack from the motherboard, but I found it easier to

  • just leave it intact since it has a pretty fragile connector.

  • I don't want to mess with it if I don't have to.

  • The rumble pack has it's own adhesive and a pretty tight slot holding it in place, but

  • my tweezers provide enough leverage to get it out.

  • Now that the motherboard and vibrator are out, all the buttons can come loose.

  • These little units are designed to only go in one hole, so don't worry too much about

  • losing track of their orientation.

  • As I set the arrow buttons into the clear housing, you can see that the little notches

  • are in different shapes for each button.

  • Clever construction on Nintendo's part.

  • I could be using the colored buttons that come with the clear kit, but I prefer the

  • gray ones personally.

  • After the buttons are set in place, the button padding goes back on top.

  • Same with the square button below it.

  • And finally we get to start putting the beautiful looking electronics back into the clear plastic.

  • The rumble pack tag goes in first since I left it attached to the motherboard.

  • And the motherboard has those two screws holding it to the plastic.

  • Remember, if you kept your screws organized, the assembly is super easy.

  • Now I'm not really sure what this little black spacer is around the joy-con joystick, but

  • I'm going to transfer it over anyway just in case it's important.

  • The joystick itself can poke it's head through the clear plastic hole and then get the two

  • screws holding it down on either corner before trying to get the ribbon cable plugged in.

  • I'll make sure the latch is up so it can receive the ribbon and then tuck it in place, locking

  • it back down again.

  • There is an unfortunate lack of Lego connectors inside these things, but the ribbons work

  • just fine.

  • I just, you know, miss sayingLegosometimes.

  • The top buttons get set into place along with the minus button.

  • It's shaped in a way that will only let you set it in one direction, and then the smaller

  • circuit boards get folded into their slots.

  • I'll zoom in a bit here so you can see exactly how they're situated with those 3 screws.

  • And finally, remember that spring you weren't supposed to lose?

  • Get that situated on top with that L button, then we can attached the trigger and battery

  • housing back over the motherboard, first getting the trigger ribbon clipped in.

  • Just like with the rest of the ribbons, each of them will have their own little latch,

  • including these side joy-con rails that we were working on earlier.

  • It's really starting to come together now and looking pretty fantastic.

  • The battery bracket has 3 of it's own screws.

  • As long as you get the motherboard screws in the right spot previously, this won't be

  • too big of a hassle.

  • I'll use my plastic pry tool to clip in the battery.

  • Metal is a bad idea when working with anything connected to power.

  • Setting the battery in place allows me to close up the whole contraption, positioning

  • the rails and trigger in a way that the whole thing can fold completely shut all the way

  • around the outside.

  • Get the 4 Y shaped screws back into the rear housing and it is one fantastic looking piece

  • of hardware; it even works.

  • At this time it would be a good idea to make sure all your buttons work before getting

  • everything officially screwed in.

  • Also keep that in mind as we start working with the right joy-con.

  • This one has some special requirements to stay functional, but I'll walk you through

  • those.

  • The right joy-con has the same 4 Y screws on the back.

  • I'll set those off to the side in an organized fashion, and then open it up like a little

  • book making sure there is zero stress on those rail ribbons.

  • After it's open I'll gently lift out the battery and then give a gentle pull on the connector

  • so it will come away from the motherboard.

  • The little antenna's the next thing to get out of the way.

  • It's got one little circular connection like we've seen inside of a lot of cell phones.

  • The battery bracket and right trigger is held in place by 3 Phillips head screws.

  • Once those are out, the bracket can lift up and out of the way.

  • It is kind of at a weird angle.

  • This joy-con is built a little bit different than the other one, but I'm still able to

  • lift the ribbon latch and free it from the controller.

  • And since I have it out right now, I might as well make this section clear to stay organized.

  • It's got the same little plastic niblets holding the trigger in place as the other joy-con.

  • Once that trigger button has popped off, we see the same little electronic switch with

  • it's one little Phillips head screw holding it in place.

  • I'll pop that off and immediately transfer it over to the clear counterpart so that one

  • little screw doesn't get lost.

  • The two springs for the triggers are still here.

  • I'll plop those in the little slots and gently line the trigger over the top of the springs.

  • This is probably one of the trickiest parts of this project.

  • Making sure the springs stay in their grooves while clipping in the trigger is like defeating

  • the final boss in a video game.

  • It is possible though.

  • Back inside the right joy-con again, the rail does need to come off.

  • I'll unlatch each of the two ribbon cables and then immediately transfer the rail onto

  • the clear section.

  • This part is the same as the other rail with the one little screw up top lifting off the

  • rail and then transferring over the black latch button and reassembling the whole thing

  • with the one little screw.

  • Pretty simple process once it's lined up right.

  • It should fit naturally without any force needed.

  • The joystick is next on our list of things to remove.

  • It's got one ribbon cable and then 2 Phillips head screws on either side of the joystick.

  • I'll wiggle that out of the hole and then remove the two screws that are still in the

  • motherboard.

  • Now this motherboard is a bit more complex.

  • It has two more ribbons at the bottom that we need to worry about, but once those are

  • disconnected, I can lift the motherboard out along with the rumble motor.

  • The infrared sensor at the bottom of the joy-con was one of those ribbons, along with whatever

  • this square thing is; if you know, let me know in the comments.

  • It's probably some kind of antenna.

  • This joy-con also has a black buffer between the joystick and the front plastic.

  • I'll move that over to the clear piece.

  • It's got little tabs to help it line up in the correct spot.

  • Then I'll start moving over some of the buttons.

  • These are just like the other joy-con where they can only go in one particular location.

  • And each button has a little rubber cushion over the top that allows it to decompress

  • every time it's pressed.

  • It's nice that they use rubber instead of something mechanical that might breakrubber

  • lasts a lot longer.

  • The last button to move over is a little plus sign up at the top of the controller, and

  • it's little rubber shield.

  • I'm going to continue using the original buttons from my switch, but there are always the colored

  • options that you see at the top of the screen.

  • To make things easier for myself, I'm going to connect the square looking ribbon cable

  • and infrared sensors before tucking the motherboard back into the clear frame.

  • Since these cables are a little short, it's easier to attach them first.

  • The rumble motor is still attached as well, so I'll plop the whole dangle contraption

  • into the clear plastic at the same time.

  • At this point in the game I'm going to make sure all the buttons can be pressed and that

  • none of them are obstructed.

  • From this point on, if you screw anything in too tight, it might make the buttons unpushable,

  • so we'll be checking that a few more times throughout the assembly.

  • The joystick is in place with it's two screws.

  • The ribbon cable is tucked in and latched down.

  • The motherboard itself has two screws holding it in place.

  • Once again, after those are tight I'll check the buttons to make sure they can still be

  • pressed.

  • If the buttons are stuck, I'll just loosen up the screws a bit.

  • It's pretty easy.

  • The joy-con rail is next with it's two ribbon cables latching onto the motherboard.

  • And then the battery bracket and trigger button get plugged in.

  • Flipping it around to sit on top of the motherboard.

  • Before the screws can go in though, the right corner button needs to be slipped into place

  • and then those three screws go into the plastic frame to hold it tight.

  • Remember, too tight, and the exterior buttons stop working.

  • So find that balance.

  • I'll use my plastic pry tool to get the battery plugged in, and then set the battery back

  • onto the holder, along with the little antenna gizmo.

  • It has the little circular plug at the bottom.

  • After it's plugged in, the antenna part just rests in a little slot next to the battery.

  • Then the whole joy-con can be folded shut like a book, lined up and closed, and then

  • the 4 Y screws go into the back panel.

  • I think this controller looks pretty awesome.

  • That black and copper colored antenna thing on the front is perfect for clear plastic.

  • Both joy-cons are now clear and appear to be functioning perfectly.

  • This thing is looking better and better by the minute.

  • The last thing to clear-ify is the console itself.

  • For this, I'll be turning the thing off and grabbing a Phillips screw driver to remove

  • the bottom two screws next to the USB-C charger.

  • Each of the side rails also need to be unscrewed.

  • Now you might be able to get away with removing one center screw since that's all that's holding

  • on the back plate.

  • But I just removed all of them for kicks and giggles.

  • Make sure you use the right sized head so the screws don't strip.

  • There is one Phillips head screw at the top of the console as well that I'll remove, and

  • then all the screws along the other side rail, keeping everything organized of course.

  • It's good to put all the screws back in the same hole they came from, even if they look

  • like they're the same size.

  • There are 4 more screws going directly into the back panel.