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  • way, residents, if we do end up getting, we really do treat them like our family and we don't want anything to happen to them were trying our hardest to stop that from happening breakfast time but rationally care Home.

  • Everyone gets a temperature check and a blast of upbeat music.

  • They're doing whatever they can to buffer the most vulnerable from the virus raging outside insight, they filmed themselves just for Channel four news.

  • Since family visits stopped 16 days ago, the job has changed thes arc eras in every sense of the word.

  • Yes, come where possible.

  • They explained to Miri on before in five residents here who have dementia.

  • What on earth is going on?

  • You know, yesterday we were talking about how this is gonna be just that stuff in visitors coming in.

  • You know, there's a body in a moment.

  • We're not late to accept any visitors into the home just to reduce the chances of us getting the longer this goes on, we hear these measures could be in place for many months or to effect.

  • Will that have on your residence?

  • I think of a great effect on the resident people naturally, are sociable gets to see their families, their gives to interacting with other people in a deal.

  • Maybe it isn't getting it into the community here.

  • It isn't some sail the high desk.

  • We're going to get people that are turning their faces to the wall that are going to get the place.

  • We really do treat them like our family, and we don't want anything to happen to them.

  • Yes, Meira has returned from hip surgery in hospital.

  • She has no symptoms, but it's spending 14 days in her room as a precaution.

  • Every day.

  • Here is a strain to keep the virus at bay and to keep spirits high way.

  • We're being told Thio.

  • Keep our distance from one another.

  • Is that possible in your environment, where struggling m and that's invading.

  • And it's very hard to him.

  • When you have people living with dementia, the spatial awareness is not there.

  • So you know there's residents that will come up in the morning and want to hug Dear are you know, be rapists, ager and, you know, distance yourself from them because a lot of stress in the streets for them that came with the video and fear there is fear, too, that the virus will find its way here faster than supplies of protective equipment from the authorities.

  • Although the Scottish government says from today it's improved, its distribution of P P and sourcing Maur is an absolute priority.

  • You have everything you need.

  • I would say that we need masks.

  • Having enough last for one person is not good enough methods off sourcing needs at the moment from social care as basically that we've to wait until they've got a confirmed case before or suspected case and they moved to form them up and then get them to us.

  • That's not good enough.

  • We need to have them and nick your home, ready for that to happen so they control what they can.

  • It's lovely to see you is instead of on the floor.

  • That means 95 year old Jesse has been seeing her daughter over video link until they were briefly reunited today.

  • The impression I have all the time is that she's fine, She's really happy and way actually see this because of the video is in the films that the hallmark putting on you?

  • Would you like to say to the people who are in their carrying fee on them day and night.

  • Um, thank you.

  • Really?

  • Really.

  • Thank you.

  • I was so grateful, so grateful to them.

  • Sorry.

  • It's really tough.

  • How do you feel about your role in this crisis?

  • Your class is very much a critical work.

  • What you're doing is so important.

  • Implode really clothes in real upload that I'm meeting a difference.

  • Really?

  • Clothes that in.

  • I'm helping people.

  • I shouldn't have taken something like this for people to appreciate what you're doing every day.

  • No, it should have been known before.

  • Protective equipment, they say, can't come soon enough.

  • But what they do have our reserves of resolve to keep these residents happy.

  • Unsafe.

  • Karen Jenkins reporting them now the trauma of losing loved ones.

  • The struggle to say goodbye in the age of Corona virus on experience, which is sadly becoming a ll too common across the UK and throughout the rest of the world.

  • Pat Mitchley died of the covert 19 virus in hospital in Sheffield yesterday.

  • Despite being 82 she was still active as a labor counselor in the city.

  • She and her husband had celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary just last year earlier, I spoke to her daughter, Joanna Mitchell E.

  • I began by asking her how suddenly the illness came on.

  • Like most people, we thought this was happening to others and not two wars.

  • Um, and suddenly we're plunge into it.

  • Two weeks ago, she was at a meeting in the community, and she's been really busy and active up until that point.

  • She then got a few symptoms and gradually became wrong well, and was admitted to hospital last Tuesday.

  • And how difficult was it at that point to get in to see her in hospital?

  • But it was very worrying because obviously we couldn't get in touch with her and we couldn't go and see her.

  • It was only on Friday that we were offered the chance to visit her, and that's when she deteriorated, and I think they realized that she wasn't gonna make it.

  • And how difficult was it for you going to see her on the cove?

  • It ward.

  • I have to wear full P p.

  • E.

  • So I would have the girl bluffs.

  • Max on.

  • That was quite difficult, obviously, you know, because it's difficult to talk somebody when you dressed like that.

  • I mean, just when you're having to wear a ll the gowns and the masks, as you described, your instinct must have bean toe try and hug your mom.

  • But presumably you just couldn't do any of that that No, it's really, really difficult.

  • And this is a completely different layers of people and in their lives, it's not what we used to.

  • It's not what we want our families, but it kind of, you know, it doesn't feel right that, but that's the way that people died.

  • But it's the way it is in a minute.

  • How are you coping with that?

  • I mean, I'm lucky because I got to see her.

  • But my my brothers and my dad and all the family members didn't and I know a huge circle of friends as well.

  • They all feel really bad that they weren't able to see her in the last couple weeks before she died on.

  • I know we're not the only people affected like that.

  • It's affecting thousands of people across the world.

  • Um, everyone's got their own stories and their own different different circumstances, but it does make you feel very fuel tion and you know it.

  • Yeah, I don't think we'll get over that very easily because it wasn't the goodbye that we wanted to give her.

  • And I know this is really hard to talk about, but given that funerals are restricted at the moment, have you thought about how you're gonna be saying your goodbyes to you?

  • Mom, um, we haven't really thought about that to share.

  • I mean, I know they're restricted, and I think because my mom was so well known well liked that we probably will have some kind of memorial service later on.

  • We'll hopefully all of this is over.

  • Um, when people can get together and share their memories offer.

  • How would you like to remember you, Mom?

  • Um well, my mom was a force of nature.

  • She was amazing.

  • And she did so much for the community and for the city of Sheffield in her 33 years of Councillor.

  • Despite it being such a difficult enter her life that the staff of the hospital in the Northern General was just amazing.

  • I can't thank them and look for letting me get in to see a, um they're working in such difficult circumstances.

  • And they were so kind and loving her, and she really impressed that on me when I went to visit her that they were being really kind to her just before she died.

  • They allowed us to take some cards and messages from other family members, and they read them out to her just about two minutes before she died.

  • So that's what he called it in on.

  • But I just want to say that they're absolute.

  • Who was everyone that's working the N hs of them?

  • And it is that you see here.

  • I'm sure they'd really appreciate hearing that.

  • I just wonder what your message was to other people who may be worried about family members with Corona virus.

  • What do you say to them at this point?

  • From my experience with the staff that we encountered, I would say that your family members include hands.

  • But I would also say that I would urge everybody to really treat this disease seriously and to follow the guidelines of social distancing to follow the guidelines off self isolation.

  • I'm now self isolating for 14 days, just really difficult because a time of bereavement.

  • I want to be with my family and friends, and I can't I've got to be on my own on.

  • I think that's an implication that maybe people don't think about as well.

  • Um, really Just follow the guidelines because we've got to save the pressure that on the n a.

  • Chester that they can care for the people that they need to Careful.

  • Do you want?

  • Um, actually, thank you so much for joining us.

  • It is really difficult time for you.

  • Really sorry for your loss.

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you.

  • Now millions of people aged 70 and above have Bean told herself isolate for atleast three months.

  • What about those who live in multigenerational households?

  • It's a particularly tricky issue for Asian communities, where 80% of those aged over 70 live with extended families are home affairs.

  • Correspondent Dash necessarily has this report.

  • I got three Children on my life on we bought for kids managers.

  • Andi, my mother in law.

  • She's housebound.

  • Dr Haider Abbas and his Children have always enjoyed living in an extended family.

  • But in the current crisis, it's become a huge source of stress.

  • I think the every family at the moment is a stress out, especially in experience in the Asian culture.

  • You know, as you probably know, very.

  • We have a kind of religious on.

  • Do you know customs and also the cultural responsibility that we have to look after our elderly parents.

  • I have many friends there, have professionals, and they have to go back to everyday to live with the elderly parents.

  • His mother in law on the he'd Fatima is 80 and, like many her age, has underlying health conditions.

  • He and his wife both go out to work for the N HS every day on the whole family.

  • Worry about the potential risks is quite worrying to see that you know she's quite does that.

  • She's quite vulnerable.

  • So there's always worry, like if she has like, if she does touch it, then that's a problem in is just quite worrying.

  • To be honest, Dr Bass is, practice is in Oldham.

  • Here, as in other areas with large Asian populations, it's common to see three or four generations living together under one roof.

  • If you're white and you're aged over 70 then statistically you're unlikely to leave with your Children or grandchildren.

  • But if your Asian and your aged over 70 then it's unlikely that you don't live with them 80% of the over seventies within Asian communities live in multigenerational households.

  • And that could mean that following the government advice on self isolating can feel almost impossible for families who live together for economic as well as cultural reasons, it can be especially difficult.

  • I have a few patients.

  • Their house boned are the end of life, their failure to care operations on their living with David extended families as he showed me around the area served by his practice, Dr Buss told me.

  • Few of his patients will have the luxury of being able to afford to have separate rooms or the space to distance themselves, that they have a big Asian population on highly populated over crowded place on there.

  • Mainly historically, you know, is socially deprived area.

  • Most of the houses are here like a 2 to 3 bedroom houses.

  • They're about 10 to turn.

  • People could be living in one house, but she's got over crowded places.

  • It can be a very high risk for the family to spread the coronavirus.

  • Health professionals fear that tight knit Muslim communities are particularly at risk of the disease.

  • Social practices of eating, praying and living together can make them vulnerable, as the doctor showed me around, a stark reminder of just how vulnerable we were approached by a man who had lost his grandfather to the virus.

  • Devastated with all the family is quite shocking to resort to hear that was a virus and you don't know where he got it from.

  • Who's been in contact with his cousin is also now critically ill in hospital reduces oxygen levels.

  • Today you have to make it back up again.

  • Many here are all too aware of the suggestion that one reason Italy was struck so hard because they, too, have a high proportion of elderly residents living with extended family.

  • There are no specific guidelines here for multigenerational households.

  • Health professionals say there should be their message tonight that these families need to try and take extra care.

way, residents, if we do end up getting, we really do treat them like our family and we don't want anything to happen to them were trying our hardest to stop that from happening breakfast time but rationally care Home.

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B1 family asian difficult people vulnerable hospital

Care homes go into virus lockdown as workers battle to protect UK’s most vulnerable

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/03/31
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