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  • Hey, everybody, Welcome to the free code camp 2018 Top contributors party in Dublin.

  • Yeah, here.

  • Before we get started, I have some very quick announcements.

  • Uh, things that air coming up very soon that I think everybody who's interested in free cocaine should know Versatile, Just like last year when freak oh, Camp participated in Hack Tober Fist and heck, Tober fest is the month of October.

  • It's a big push to get people to contribute to open source.

  • Last year, freak oh, camps guide was the number one most contributed to open source repo, uh, as part of Octoberfest, we're taking a lot of the existing repositories.

  • We've got learned we've got curriculum, We've got the freak.

  • Oh, camps last week.

  • Okay, The main repositories, Uh, and then we've got the guide.

  • We're working two unify thes repose into a single repository That will make it easier for everybody to get the local freak.

  • Okay, running a couple other announcements.

  • Since you're watching this on the YouTube channel, According to like the YouTube analytics, we looked at freak.

  • Oh, Camp is now the fastest growing programming YouTube channel.

  • Yeah, and we're getting about 50,000 new subscribers a month.

  • If you create compelling videos about programming and you're interested, we would love to help more people see your your videos.

  • So, uh, just reach out to us and we could make that happen.

  • But for us, we wantto put as many amazing videos on YouTube as we can.

  • We're here in Dublin.

  • Were at I've got a cool sign for it.

  • The Huckle tree, which is a really cool hipster name.

  • I'm gonna try to talk to as many of you all is possible and just interview and learn more about you.

  • So Hey, I'm here with Rianna Swift.

  • You have been involved with freak.

  • Oh, camp.

  • This is basically the beginning.

  • Maybe you can just give us, Ah, high level over you of your involvement with freak.

  • Oh, camp and and your transition into being a developer.

  • Yeah.

  • So I found free code camp.

  • Why was an elementary school music teacher I was trying to learn how to code?

  • Um, I love kids.

  • I love teaching music, but I knew it wasn't a career that I wanted to do forever.

  • So I was like, what?

  • Can I learn how to d'oh without having to quit my job and go back to school.

  • I couldn't afford to do that.

  • And I thought The people that make the Internet are probably the first ones to put all of that information for free on the Internet.

  • So I did code academy mostly JavaScript type stuff and found my way onto free code camp.

  • I was really involved on Twitter.

  • That was my only community.

  • I was really have alone while I was learning and went through the free code camp challenges.

  • And as soon as I started doing that, it started to get involved in the chat room, which there was no forum at that point and started doing some pear programming and streaming that, um so free code camp really not only taught me the fundamentals that he needed for, you know, for development and for software, but also gave me a community in a place toe, you know, misery.

  • Almost how hard it is to learn at a go and based on your videos on YouTube and the skills that you were able to build up just learning the code on your own and through different communities, you were able to eventually get a job.

  • Ah, can you talk a little bit about your job and how you got it.

  • Yeah.

  • Yes, I work it.

  • Get Hub, Which is not where I thought I would be working when I started learning to code.

  • I'm a trainer.

  • So most of the time I'm talking to developers about how to use, get and get help.

  • So regardless of what language they're programming in, regardless of what type of projects, how big their team is, everybody should probably be using version control.

  • And git is not the simplest thing to wrap your head around.

  • So it's a similar challenge to these computer science concepts, Like, how can we make this simple and approachable?

  • Um, this, You know, that transition was weird because coming from elementary school music teacher to working and get hub is kind of a jump.

  • Um, but But I think working with those videos specifically and saying How can we take these difficult concepts and make them approachable to anybody is something that really primed me for working again.

  • So I think even if somebody's going through free code camp, and if you're going through free code camp and you're like, I don't know if I necessarily see myself as a full time developer.

  • That's okay.

  • Like there are so many places for you that are perfect free who that you might just not know exist.

  • Like I didn't know that this job existed, but I love it.

  • Awesome.

  • Thanks again.

  • Why don't you just tell us a little bit about yourself?

  • Beat?

  • Sure, sir.

  • My name's pizza.

  • And I'm a data scientist based in London on I, uh, right for and help out at the media publication.

  • I've been doing that since October last year.

  • So almost Vienna on it's really fun is really interesting to see what articles we receive and and, you know, so curating them and helping it and, you know, high stands we we like to put up.

  • What is your editorial work?

  • Flu like about how frequently will you check in and find articles that you're interested in editing and publishing?

  • I see.

  • So we do receive a lot of articles was always something to work on.

  • I try and check in daily, actually.

  • Take my lunch breaks at work as an opportunity to, you know, see what there is and review some of the articles.

  • And if I see one I think I can.

  • I can help.

  • You know, Adam, get to, you know, standard we want.

  • Then I'll claim that article in the evening.

  • I'll work on it on dhe.

  • Send it to Abby for final review in publishing Certs.

  • Thanks, Peter.

  • Have a seat, Richie.

  • Just give us an overview of some of the things you do.

  • Yeah, so I mean way we met a couple of years back.

  • You know, frequent cam was stole in its early days and stuff.

  • Um, so So what I do you currently is basically run meet ups.

  • I'm a core admin for free co came Johnsburg.

  • There's a couple of other guys that some came and went and still a day, but somehow domain my active wouldn't need it Need be, But I'm generally, like, you know, organized stuff and host the meetups themselves building.

  • We're building an events platform That'll make it easier for people in Johannesburg when they're just using freak.

  • Oh, camp toe.

  • Remind them.

  • Hey, there's an event in, you know, at the nearby office where you're having your next event.

  • So I I'm optimistic that will help even more people who are already in Johannesburg who uh, don't realize that you're having all these in person events that will help get them involved as well.

  • Absolutely.

  • Yeah.

  • I mean, another aspect of it.

  • I mean, it's ah, we were talking about how else myself, in evidence.

  • We were talking about how else we can contribute.

  • Like, Is this all we can do, you know, is is that, like, how do we take it to the next level?

  • And my response to that was like, That's a very good question, brother.

  • What do you think?

  • And over there.

  • So he gave me his peace of mind for me, I think for now is like, we need to continue doing what we've been doing.

  • Because personally, I mean, for me, the reason why I believe in this and why I'm still doing what What I'm doing now is that I see very in this, you know, I truly believe, like, this is, um, one way that we can I know it sounds very look up in the sky, but I really like this is one way off actually tackling poverty.

  • Andi, I see people that have frustrated in the jobs people that they just you know, just gotta work just for the heck of it.

  • But they don't enjoy it.

  • You know, for me, I strongly believe in there like you have to really enjoy what you do.

  • And I absolutely love what I'm doing right now.

  • Thanks to you free court camp.

  • And I think the way just back to my original point was that how to take it forward is, first of all, we need to keep doing what we're doing.

  • You know, don't drop the standard and obviously think off other ways of how we can improve it.

  • Whether it is, I don't know, maybe writing article.

  • If you would say you were doing like, you trip stuff or you're hosting meet ups, maybe, just, you know, think of other ways off contributing more.

  • Or it is getting other people to fool the same passion that you have so that they can also continue in and contribute to the platform in different ways.

  • Yeah, Richie, it's been such a pleasure, man.

  • Thank you so much for flying out here.

  • Well, David, you are a prolific, uh, writer, among other things.

  • And I think you have a very interesting background.

  • Can you tell the audience a little bit about yourself and how you got into coding and writing my code.

  • Okay, First of all, Quincy, I'm really grateful to you that you created free code can because I think it was really the major help for me to switch my career's because, as you mentioned, I was working as a lawyer.

  • I have a law degree and then I was working as a lawyer for two years.

  • But then I got eventually a little bit frustrated, and I was wondering what to do next.

  • So I was checking online courses and stuff.

  • And funny thing.

  • First, I check some Harvard course about cooking about molecular gastronomy, and I spent like, three months doing that.

  • But I said to me, Okay, I cannot be cool because I'm sweating and in the kitchen there's a lot of hot in here, so I couldn't cook, So I tried to watch it for something else.

  • And then I find first some, of course, on you, Demi, about programming CSS, html and Java.

  • Scoob and I tried that.

  • But then it was just a tutorial, you know, building things that are people built.

  • So it was kind of it was great I got motivated, but it was just the first level.

  • And then I discovered free coat camp and those algorithms, and it was basically a different dimension for me because before I was just creating stuff according to tutorials.

  • But with algorithms, I need to really understand.

  • And at first I got really frustrated because I think, My God, it's so difficult.

  • I can't be developer But then it really just wood was better and better.

  • And finally I got really confident and really, I started learning to call during the weekends and on the evenings and it eventually it took me seven months to switch from a lawyer to developer just coding on the weekends and tonight.

  • So I'm really great for free.

  • Coach came because it really motivated me to see all the people doing the same thing, although so why I decide for contributing for record came by writing articles because, you know, a free code can community helped me to became developer, and I also wanted to contribute to it by by showing people concepts that were difficult for me.

  • So I try to like describe them in a way that are more understandable for me and in a way that I want them to be to see them when I learned them because there were no resources before.

  • Yeah, that's I think, the part of my story and maybe just the main thing.

  • What I decide to change switched careers was that as a lawyer, I didn't see the results of my work.

  • A za programmer.

  • I mean, you're right, counsel that look and you see the result.

  • It's so motivating you just a white coat and you see the result.

  • I love this.

  • And this is while our programming tears tell us a little about, uh, about what you're working on out in Portugal.

  • Uh, Eduardo, and you're leading the study group there.

  • Well, I first knew free code camp in the beginning of 2017 on I was a civil engineering on.

  • I was not happy with my career.

  • I wanted to reboot in tow into programming on when I met frequent camp.

  • I met the right past to start pulling out the program.

  • I've tried a lot off boot camps without effort but frequent camp.

  • It was very, very easy to follow follow up on, and at the same time that I was studying, I started to motivate people to study with me.

  • I started the same time as wrong with Rick.

  • And together we started to study group in our city on way impersonated also the starting off the study group in Lisbon, the capital off Portugal on.

  • You are doing that report every week, even after we get we got our jobs.

  • Yeah, I've rebooted my career in five months, studying Mara less 10 hours per day.

  • But it was that's it was five months and I got from Civil Engineering toe a front end developer.

  • How many people within your study group who've gotten developer jobs, do you think?

  • First, missy, let me tell you that we are in the south of Portugal, So it's a small town like 50,000 inhabitants on.